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BOOST 






OUR WINNING 






TEAM! 





LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



WELCOME TO 
JOINT SESSION 
FRIDAY NIGHT 



VOLUME VII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1931 



No. 1C 



LOCALS 



.... HRASH 
URSINUS 33-47 



HELLER STARS IN FIRST 
VICTORY OF 
SEASON 



Lebanon Valley chalked up its first 
victory of the season with a 47-33 
win over the Ursinus College court- 
men on Wednesday night at College- 
pdlle. 

The Blue and White started well 
and gained a lead early in first half. 
They held the advantage throughout 
the ga-me, holding a 23 to 14 lead at 
the end of the opening session 

Cal Heller and Stewart were the 
outstanding figures in the winning at- 
tack. Both of these men were in great 
form and time and again rolled the 
ball through the basket from the field 
of play. Cal tallied eight field goals 
and two fouls for a total of eighteen 
points, while Bob caged six twin point- 
ers and a pair of penalty tosses for 
fourteen points. 

Lodge was the star of the Ursinus 
team giving the local guards plenty 
of work in holding him down. He 
gathered in a total of eleven points 
for Ursinus. 

At the rate the team is going, Leb- 
anon Valley should have a highly suc- 
cessful season. The next game will 
be played next Friday against Sus- 
quehanna at Selinsgrove where an- 
other victory is expected. 
' Dean Salada, the manager, has 
booked two more home games for the 
team. On February 5 St. John's of 
Annapolis will play here and on Feb- 
ruary 17 Mt. St. Mary's will be the 
opponent in what should be a real 
contest. 

Continued on Page 4) 



INTERCLASS BASKETBALL 
SCHEDULE ANNOUNCED 



The Interclass Basketball League is 
again functioning with one game 
already played and another one sched- 
uled for this week. The league is under 
the auspices of the Varsity "L" Club 
and the games will be played in the 
Alumni Gymnasium at 6:15 P. M. 

Last year the championship went to 
the class of '30 after a playoff game 
with the present Juniors. In the pres- 
ent race the Juniors and Seniors ap- 
pear to have the best chance of cap- 
turing the pennant. 

The schedule of games follows: 

Thu. Jan. 15 Seniors vs. Sophs, 

Thu. Jan. 22 Sophs, vs. Frosh. 

Thu. Feb. 5 Juniors vs. Seniors. 

Thu. Feb. 12 Seniors vs. Frosh. 

Thu. Feb. 19..... Juniors vs. Sophs. 

Thu. Feb. 26 Play off (If necessary). 

The above dates and time of games 
are subject to change, which will be 
a nnounced if any are made. 



READERS CLUB HOLD 

REGULAR MEETING 

On Tuesday evening at seven o'clock, 
the Reader's Club met at the home of 
Dr. Wallace. About fifteen were pres- 
ent for a most interesting program. 
The regular program for this meeting 
was not used and in place of it, Mr. 
.Shellenberger ed the evening's discus- 
sion on a poet unknown to the public 
.because of his singular modesty and 
lack of pretension, but who chanced to 
be intimate friend of Mr. Shellenber- 
ger— Mr. Lloyd Mifflin of Columbia, 
Pa. Because of his intimate refer- 
ences and his interest in this man, Mr. 
Shellenberger delighted his audience 
by his detailed narration of Mr. Miff- 
lin's life, of the work he has produced 
including sonnets and poems on class- 
ical, descriptive, philosophical and 
symbolical lines. 

After Edward Shellenberger's splen- 
did sketch, several members of the 
Club read portions of Mr. Mifflin's 
work. Ethel Hower, Robert Eshle- 
man, Sara Ensminger, ar.d Arlin? 
Heckrote all read poems of varied 
types of his style and representative 
pf his work. Two of the poems were 
beautiful sonnets, "The Spirit" and 
"The Ultimate Day," and among the 
other poems read, were "How a Lover 
Speaks of His Beloved," "Angel of 
Peace," "Castilian Days," and "My 
Lady of Dream." 

Then Margaret Lane rendered a 
pleasing resume of the life of Edna 
St. Vincent Milay including a few 
snatches of her poetry. Paul Evancoe 
ended the program with several re- 
marks and comments on the program 



"Y'S" PRES 
VESPER MUSICAL 



ENT 



EXHIBITION OF STUDENT 
TALENT PROVES 
IMPRESSIVE 



Mr. and Mrs. Benton Smith and 
daughter, of Chester, Penna., sailed 
January 3, for England. Mr. Smith 
^as graduated from L. V. in '24 and 
is now connected with the Scott Tis- 
Su e Co. Mrs. Smith will be remember- 
e d as Dorothy Fencil of the Class of 
'23. 



A vesper musicale was presented by 
the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A.'s, at a 
joint session held in Engle Conserva- 
tory, Sunday evening, Jan. 11. A large 
number of Campfire musicians were 
represented on the program which was 
well planned and carefully arranged. 
All the participants proved to be 
skillful artists, each in his own field 
and the audience was much impresse:' 
by their various renditions. The pro- 
gram as presented, is given below:— 

"Nocturne," Op. 15, No. 2 Chopin 

"Valse Triste" Sibelius 

Mr. J. Robert Eshelman Piano. 

"Largo," from Xerxes Handel. 

Miss Virginia Thrush Cello. 

Mr. Francis Barr Violin 

Come, ye Blessed" Scott. 

"The Birth of Spring" Steffen 

Miss Hester Thompson 

Miss Mary K. Goshert Piano. 

"Graduation March Greenwald. 

Miss Gretna Drawbaugh Mandolin. 

Miss Christine Gruber Piano. 

Selection of songs Quartet. 

Mr. Chester Goodman 

Mr. Allen Rauck. 

; Mr. Clyde Mentzer. 

Mr. George Brubaker 

"Rhapsoady" Damarest 

Miss Margaret Young Organ. 

Mr. J. Robert Eshelman Piano. 



JUNIOR TOSSERS 
TRIM FRESHMAN 

YEARLINGS DROP FIRST 
INTER-CLASS 
MATCH 



The interclass basketball league 
sponsored by the "L" Club got off to l 
flying flying start when the Juniors 
downed the Freshmen 39-18 last Fri- 
day night in the Alumni Gymna- 
sium. The Juniors in running up 
their score looked impressive and 
showed that they will be in the run- 
ning for the championship. 

The Freshman started well and 
held the lead for a few minutes. The 
Juniors soon began to work togethei 
and ran up a comfortable lead. Salek 
sank four field goals to lead the scor- 
ing. At half time the score stood at 
24-6 favor the class of '32. 

In the last half the playing was 
more equal. Brub ker, Frosh center, 
put in three long shots and as Lech- 
thaler and Salek went out on person- 
als it looked as if the lead might be 
reduced. However the Juniors again 
took the upper hand as Hughes and 
Shortlidge sank several goals from 
the field. 

Brubaker was the high scorer with 
nine points while Pickle and Salek 
each had eight. 

The next game will be between the 
Seniors and Sophomores. Neither of 
these teams has seen action. 

Continued on Page 4) 



PROF. WAGNER 

RETURNS TO CAMPUS 



Professor Wagner has reassumed 
his duties after a week's absence. We 
are indeed glad to see him well and 
able to continue the stupendous 
amount of work which is alloted to 
him. Dr. Wagner's schedule ig a 
heavy one and his extra curriculr ac- 
tivities are many. In addition he 
must always be accessible when affairs 
of the activities committee must be 
discussed. We trust he will be well 
and continue his splendid work here 
on our campus. 



Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Witmeyer 
have recently announced the birth of a 
daughter, Janet, December 28, 1930. 
Mr. Witmeyer is a graduate of the 
class of '16. After his graduation he 
taught for one year in the Plymouth 
High School, Plymouth, Pa., after 
which he took work at Columbia Uni- 
versity from '17-'21. He then served 
as Supt. of Schools in Columbia, 
Penna., and now is Supt. of Schools in 
Shamokin, Pa. 



! COLLEGE CALENDAR 



HISTORY CLUB HOLDS 

FIRST 1931 MEETING 



FRIDAY— Joint Sessions: — Kalo- 
Olio Program and Delphian- 
Philo Program. 

SUNDAY— Friendly Hour, 5:45— j 
North Hall Parlor. 

! TUESDAY— Recital in Engle Con- 
servatory, 8:00. 



Last Wednesday evening at 7:00 
o'clock the first meeting of the History 
Ulub for this semester was called to 
v,rder by the president, Joseph Wood. 
After delivering the address of wel- 
ome and outlining plans for the future 
activities of the organization, the 
president turned over the period to 
„hose who had been selected to render 
.he program. 

Jxuch fcihroyer fir^t gave an interest- 
ing talk on "The S-tuation in Russia.' 
.ohe was followed by Anne Rupp, who 
gave a fine sketch of the life of the 
aate Marsnai Joft-e. Paul Emraen- 
iheiser concluaed tae program with a 
semi-humorous discussion of the theme 
'Why Filing Graues Are Given in 
College." 

The meeting was then turned into 
a social period. Music and informal 
discussion brought the meeting to a 
close. 



CANADIAN SPEAKS 
ON PROHIBITION 



PRAISES UNITED STATES 
SYSTEM VS. CANADIAN 
CONTROL 



At Chapel on Monday morning the 
student body met a pleasant surprise, 
when Mr. Spence of the Anti-Saloon 
League, and a Canadian by birth, 
'spoke, to it on the differences of Pro- 
hibition in United States and the 
.Government control of liquor in Can- 
ada. 

He showed the audience that Pro- 
hibition was, by a great deal, bettei 
than the government control of liquoi 
in Canada. The government control 
in Canada, he said, has not done awa> 
with any drinking in Canada but has 
just lifted it from a low scale to a 
high scale and made it, as it were, 
a thing of high society. 

Along with his talk he produced 
several prepared charts showing thai 
creased the amount of drink sold, 
the government control has not de- 
used, or manufac Lured, that it has 
increased the number of cases of 
drunkenness, the number of criminal 
cases arising from drink, etc. 

He had the facts and they could 
not be disputed. He claimed that the 
manner of control in Canada has 
taken the drink out of the Saloon and 
put it in the home and in more places 
where the elite gather. They do not 
have saloons in Canada, they have 
beer-parlors. The difference being the 
absence of the "good ole" brass rail 
in the latter. 

During the day he again lectured 
to several of the classes. His visit 
was terminated by a meeting in the 
afternoon in which there was a gen- 
eral discussion on the problem of Pro- 
hibition, if it may be called a problem. 
In this meeting he showed clearly that 
many of the "loyal" Canadians did 
not know the facts about their own 
(continued on page four) 



LAFAYETTE TAKES 
OPENING GAME 



LAST MINUTE RALLY 
FAILS BY TWO 
POINTS 



After leading throughout most of 
the game, Lebanon Valley's quintette 
failed in the last few minutes and lost 
a close game to Lafayette at Easton 
last Saturday night. The final score 
was 29-27 in favor of Lafayette. 

Lebanon Valley took an early lead 
and at one time in the first half were 
ahead by seven points. However 
the Maroon team opened up and scored 
enough points to tie the score which 
stood at 15-15 at half time. 

At the start of the second half the 
Blue and White again took the lead 
as Stewart and Frey rolled up seven 
points. At that point Captain Adams, 
who had been directing his team from 
the bench injected himself into the 
fray and gave new life to the Leop- 
ards. Lafayette rallied and scored 
ncugh points to win the game. 

A last minute rally by Lebanon 
(continued on page four) 



L. V. C. IS REPRESENTED 
AT YOUTH CONGRESS 



During the Christmas holidays, 
from December 30 to January 2, ap- 
proximately four hundred young peo- 
ple of the United Brethren Church, 
epresenting more than eighteen states 
assembled at Dayton, Ohio for the 
purpose of considering and discuss- 
ing the problems of the youth of to- 
day. The theme of the Congress was 
"Our Share in Bu'lding a Christian 
World." From the time of the open- 
ing session, Tuesday evening until the 
close of the Congress, Friday morn- 
ing, four challenging questions were 
considered, either in discussion groups 
or in addresses made by outstanding 
leaders of the church. The problems 
discussed were: "The World As It 
Faces Youth Today," "The Place of 
the Church in Modern Life," "Jesus' 
Contribution to My Life" and "Our 
Personal Share in Building a Chris- 
tian World." 

The keynote speaker was Rev. Wal- 
ter Van Kirk Ph.D. from New York 
City, who is associate secretary of 
the Commission on International Jus- 
tice and Goodwill. Among the other 
speakers were: Rev. Ray A. Burkhart, 
Rev. Josiah P. Landis, PhD, Rev. O. 
T. Deever D. D., Dr. Charesl E. Ash- 
craft and Rev. J. Gordan Howard. 

Added features of the Congress 
were the presence of the Higgins Sis- 
ters' Quartette and Male Quartette 
from Indiana Central College, the 
banquet at Bonebrake Seminary and 
the visitation to the U. B. Publishing 
House and Otterbein Home. 

Among the delegates were three re- 
presentatives from the Phillipines, 
one from China and one from Africa, 
all of whom are students in various 
institutions in the United States. 
Lebanon Valley's representatives were 
Ruth Coble, J. Robert Eshleman and 
Grant Umberger. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1931 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



V weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Editor 

K. Koudabush, '31 ... .Associate Editor 
R. Morgan, '31 Managing Editor 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31. 
Ruth Shroyer, '32 
Hilda Buckley, 32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33.Gen'l Reporter- 
Mary Goshert r '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 Business Manager 

1 J . Keene, '32.. Asst. Business Manager 

C. Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. VV. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
cratron of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies io cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Arrnville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under tne 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



Ye>h team! Another bull-tosser 
joins the ranks (and not from Brook 
lyn) with the nom de plum (served 
with pretzels) of O. H. S. And to 
the person or female who guesses 
the identity of this matador we will 
present two slightly used apple cores, 
a rubber toothpick and a nice new 
pineapple ,the Chicago variety. Here's 
the boy in action. 



RESOLUTIONS 

Have you made any as yet? Oi 
have you broken all those you diu 
make? Well, anyway, here are some 
suggestions. 

Why not resolve to quit knockin 
and start boosting the organization, 
of the campus? And why not star, 
on the Literary Societies? They neeo 
your support, and they certainly can 
do without your knocks, 
i Then there are the thousand-and- 
■one other activities of the campus. 
The Quittie needs your photographs, 
the team needs your cheers, the profs 
crave a little attention, and the poor 
down-trodden Editor of the La Vie 
begs for a few roses to hand the 
staff, just to decorate the brick-bat 
you know. 



MORE SPIRIT 



Fine work, team, fine work. You 
came through in fine fashion in thai 
Ursinus game. We're proud of you 
to say the least. 

Now listen, fellows, we've got a lo< 
of faith in your ability. We believe 
you can show us some real basket- 
-ball this season. We're especially 
prcud of the fine playing the new 
men have been doing. But to be quite 
fair with you, this isn't all your job 
It's up to us to back you with some 
real, peppy cheering. 

Here's an idea for the cheer leaders 
Why not have a pep meeting every 
>pnce in a while and send the boys 
off in the right sort of spirits ? W' 
can't all go to the games but we car 
all snow the boys that we are confi- 
dent in their ability. What do you 
say? 



A WELCOME SNOW 



As a usual policy; we are not very 
fond of snow, that is, the sloppy 
slushy kind recently experienced. In 
spite of over aversion, however, we 
were greatly relieved when the last 
snow arrived to cover the sordid mess 
that has been allowed to accumulate 
to the rear of the Men's Dormitory. 

Orange-peels, apple cores, cigarette 
stubs, broken bottles, razor blades 
waste paper — everything fit for the 
garbage-pail was in evidence. Nor is 
this sordid business confined to the 
rear of the Dorm; the campus in front 
of the Dorm has been similarly de- 
scented to a lesser degree. What a 
stinking resemblance to the streets of 
a city in the Dark Ages before the 
days of sewers and garbage cans! 

We openly challenge the Men's 
Senate to assert its authority and stop 
this nuisance. Do they have backbone 
enough to accept our challenge? 



Young Mr. 1931 ushered in many 
.hings including headaches, noise, tir- 
ed feet, police and hang-overs. Just 
how many L. V. C. students actually 
witnessed the debut of a New Year 
is hard to find out as many ar e not 
quite certain, and this column does 
not print anything but actual "fax"! 
So with the coming of new year LA 
/IE COLLEGIENNE blossoms out 
with a new feature written by that 
celebrated old college columnist O. H. 
3. Just what his identity is no one 
knows and I am sure that O. H. S. 
himself doesn't want it known who 
writes this Brainstorm. (For numer- 
ous reasons.) 



trying to read over my shoulder. Hard 
cider. Hysteric Radio Sopranos. 
Bridge. Clammy handshakers. Odors 
from the Labratory. Red hair. Prick- 
ly heat. December. Bill collector's. 
Work and Dentists I 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



This brings to a close the first in- 
stallment of this column! Any con- 
tributions will gladly be accepted, just 
write plainly, in English, and hand 
them into the La Vi e office. Re- 
member we print nothing but the 
truth — well, nearly the truth! 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



This is not a column for the educat- 
ed people! It is written exclusively 
tor College people! It's contents is 
solely about human beings and Facul- 
ty of this great old institution! (This 
is not flattery or handshaking). 



The purpose of this column is strict- 
y honorable! Believeit or not — it's 
your privilege. However, the writer 
made one New Year's resolution and 
.hat is to conduct this column as long 
as any one is foolish enough to read 
.t, and to write in fun! We hope that 
all readers will take the attempts at 
mmor and wit in the same vein. There 
.s not one line of malice or ridicule 
ntenticnally written in any line cap- 
tioned by O. H. S. So as the billiard 
balls said, "Let's get together.". 



I heard a good one on Mary Ann 
».upp the other day. The other even- 
ing the telephone rang in North Hall, 
is telephones usually do, and a husky 
baritone voice inquired of the ycung 
lady who answered if Miss Rupp was 
„here ? Being after twelve, Mary Ann 
was there and in due course of time 
;he sleepily affirmed this statement ! 
The Gent, with the unguaranteed bar- 
tone asked if this was Dottie Thomp- 
son, whereupon Mary Ann became all 
•.gitated and said that the party on 
!;'he other end of the line must have 
.he wrong number, or words to that 
affect! 

The aforementioned party of the 
first part wanted to know if this was 
one-nine-three-one? By this time our 
fair damsel was thoroughly provoked 
and said No, this was North Hall. 
Then the wise-acre told her to change 
her calendar as he was informed that 
this was Ninteen thirty-one! 



Did you notice the tie on "Brute" 
Lehman? Somebody must have had a 
grudge again him! Season's greet- 
ings. 



New Year's day brought to sight 
many funny (ha-ha) things. Others 
not so funny!! Can you imagine Red 
Wogan's embarrassment when his Dad 
called him out of bed at noon and 
said the Drummer of the Orchestra 
at the Valencia wanted to know what 
he did with his instrument after he 
led the parade up Princess street. 



Things I don't like. 

Horses, Mother-in-law seats in 
auto's. High blood pressure. Writing 
this trash. Classes. Chef's soup. Guy's 



Clio's program on Friday evening, 
January 9, 1931 was in the form of a 
parlor. A business meeting preceded 
the program. Devotions were led by 
the chaplain, Ethel Hower, who pre- 
sented a helpful lesson, containing 
suggestions for the beginning of a 
new year by following Christ in mak- 
ing the most of our opportunities to 
help others. 

The scene of the party was at the 
home of a young man and wife who 
had provided special amusement for a 
group of their friends in the way of 
a traveling troupe of musicians and 
entertainers. 

The eader of the troupe was an old 
German gentleman who performed 
slight-of-hand tricks. Eulalie Morton, 
in her usual witty manner excellently 
took this part, adding zest to her 
performance with clever jokes. Then 
the various other members of the 
band displayed their talents. Ruth 
Coble, as Paderewski's double, render- 
ed a piano solo which delighted her 
listeners. The troupe contained Amos 
and Andy in the persons of Mae Fauth 
and Catherine Gockley, whose humor 
called forth volumes of laughter. The 
group was not without an orator, who 
might have been an equal of Henry 
Clay: Ethel Mae Hower humorously 
but forcibly presentel several quite 
amazing facts concerning Prohibition. 

This brought to a conclusion the 
Ney Year's Eve party of the program 
but was the beginning of the real 
party of teh evening, in which all 
those present took part. The remain- 
der of the evening was spent in danc- 
ing and jollity. 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



"The Ivory Door", a medieval play 
containing much mystery and legen- 
dary romance, was discussed by Miss 
Mary K. Wallace at the Delphian 
meeting, Friday, Jan. 9. This was the 
iniatory step taken toward the plan- 
ning and arranging of a program for 
the approaching anniversary in Febru- 
ary. 

Following this, a brief but entertain- 
ing program was presented. A piano 
solo was skillfully rendered by Hester 
Thompson. A musical reading, "The 
Finding" by Rupert Brooke, was then 
given by Evangeline Salerio, accom- 
panied by Augustus Trachte at the 
piano. The final number consisted of 
two vocal selections, "Out of the 
Dust" and "The Fairy Visit," sung by 
Margaret Young in a very artistic 
manner. 

The installation of the newly-elected 
officers then took place. The following- 
individuals were signally honored: — 

Anniversary President 

Caroline Fisher. 

Vice President Dorothy Hafer. 

Chaplain Marie Gelwicks. 

Critic Ruth Shroyer. 

Corr. Sec Mary Buff ington. 

Pianist Leona Allen. 

Rec. Sec Gladys Hershey. 

Wardens 

....Gem Gemmil and Dorothy Ely. 



The regular literary meeting oi 
Philo was called to order on Friday 9 
by the president, Charles Wise. Devo- 
tions wer e conducted by the chaplain 
Stuart Werner. 

Paul Emenheiser opened the pro- 
gram with a speech entitled, "Philo 
Traditions." He reviewed the past ol 
Philo, calling to the attention of his 
audience the high principles and the 
prominent men of the society. At 
times he became quite oratorical, and 
the talk was interrupted frequently by 
applause. Using the same subject 
"Traditions of Philo," Paul Keene 
gave a foreward look to the audience 
Assuming the role of a prophet, he 
predicted the future of several oi 
those present and due to his humor- 
ous embellishments, appreciation of 
his talk was manifested through 
laughter. 

Clinton Allen rendered the musi- 
cal part of the program by giving a 
piano solo, "The Lorlie." The sur- 
prising aspect of this number was 
that he was scheduled for a declama- 
tion. 

The closing number was a skit en- 
titled "Bullation." John Hughes and 
Robert Rawhouser were the stars of 
this cross between a debate, a dia- 
logue, and a minstrel show. A fair 
estimate of the humor attached to 
the number can be ascertained by the 
fact that before they said a word, the 
audience laughed continuously for five 
minutes. For good, clean, spontaneous 
fun-making this pair proved their 
great ability. 

After quite a few remarks for the 
good of the order, the meeting was 
adjourned. 




Well, we lost out first cage tilt to 
the Lafayette Generals by a margi n 
of two points. We should have Won 
the game but shots that roll around 
the rim of the basket don't count— 
they must go through. Let's profit 
by our costly first lesson. 



Ursinus is our second foe, they 
have lost four games and won only 
two. Let's win our first game at their 
expense. We beat them twice last 
year by decisive scores. Will we re- 
peat? We're not Shakespeare! 



F. and M. our strong rivals from 
Lancaster threw a scare into the 
"much talked of" Dickinson five. They 
were nosed out in the last minute of 
play by one point. 



Muhlenberg is slow in starting their 
schedule this year. They have played 
only one game to date and that was 
against the Moravian College Five. 
They won by a decisive score. They 
won the conference title last year and 
beat them by a margin of J.5 
points. What does that make us? 
Another "mythical" something — Eh 
what ? 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



The Kalozetean Literary held their 
regular meeting last Friday night with 
George Becher the new president pre- 
siding. A varied program consisting 
of several humorous skits was pre- 
sented. The first number was a clever 
presentation by the Honorable Will- 
iam Seiger and Brother Pipler. It 
held the interest of all and provided 
several good laughs. Messrs. Shor- 
tage, Kinney, McCusker, Frivola and 
Salek then gave a series of extem- 
peraneous talks that were not "slam 
proof." After this the meeting was 
adjourned. 



Much preparation has been going 
on toward making the Kalo-Clio joint 
session one of the best in the history 
of either of the societies. Rumors 
have been handed out that quite an 
unusual program is in store. The 
judiciary committee of the societies 
are hosts to many smiles of late. This 
alone is enough to signify that the 
best of the season is in store. Come 
one! — Come all! — Kalos, Clios to the 
big joint session of the year in Kalo 
hall. Friday, January lGth at 8 o'clock. 
Don't forget — Station K-A-L-0 sign- 
ing off! 



Susquehanna is the first team we. 
will see in action on the home court. 
They come here February 14th. Let's 
get the old pep band going and be 
on hand to give the team the right 
kind of support. We only have three 
home games for some reason or other. 
Let's get ou r money's worth I 



Against Lafayette last Saturday, 
the scoring honors went to Bob 
Stewart who had a total of 13 points. 
Bob plays a fine floor game and it 
looks as though he has his "eye" 
this year. 



Cal Heller scored 5 points which 
is a "let down" for Cal. He missed 
several "sure" shots. Here's hoping 
he comes out of it. •* He will — don't 
worry. Cal doesn't! 



President Hoover's new Tariff Com- 
mission was completed today when the 
Senate confirmed the nomination of 
Edgar B. Brossard, Utah, and Lincoln 
Dixon, of Indiana. Brossard virtually 
all of the opposition of the Senate cen- 
tered around his appointment. 



Experts studying the Philadelphia 
city transit system disagree to the ex- 
tent of $35,000,000 on an "approval of 
its assets. 



The trustees of the University of 
Pennsylvania have affirmed the pur- 
pose of establishing a campus at Val- 
ley Forge. For the first time this pro- 
ject has become an integral part of 
the University program. 



Sweeney Light played his usual 
stellar game at guard — holding down 
his man and adding a "bucket" now 
and then. 



Williams and Sprenkle were the new 
men seen in action. Both played a nice 
game. With a little more practice they 
may round-out into capable first 
stringers. 



Luke Shrom of Ephrata is showing 
up well in practice. He is expected to 
make the Ursinus trip. He has the 
height, we'll find out if he has the rest 
after we see (him "under fire. 



The Juniors proved to be as strong 
as last year by trouncing theFrosh 
37-17. The Sophs have a rejuvenated 
team this year — will they break their 
losing streak? We'll find out Friday 
night when they tangle with the 
Seniors in the College "ice-box." 



Let's not forget that all of the 
class games are held as benefit for the 
"L" club the only athletic organiza- 
tion on the Campus — Let's support our 
class team and help the "L" Club 
—What's a dime? 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1931 



PAGE THREE 



THE BOOMERANG 

2ech — I've decided to keep a 
in m y room. 
Goodman— But how about the smell ? 
Zech — Oh, he'll get used to that. 



— oJi 

goat 



Ode to Gertie — Kinney 
(Used by permission of Shortlidge and 

Frivola, publishers) 
jsjight after night I sit and pine, 
Hoping that someday you'll be mine, 
gut all my dream castles have gone 
away; 

The reason for which I know not why^ 
Love came stealing into my heart — 
I pray that it may never depart, 
precious Gertie answer my prayer 
And HI follow you, dear, everywhere. 

Allie. 



The dean of Hunter College says 
that College girls don't have enough 
parties — they stay home and study 
more than is good for them. Yeah? 



Say what you will about rouge it 
has saved many a girl from a color- 
less existence. 



Sonny — What are you reading? 
Corker — Life of Kit Carson. 
Sonny — Whoever she was, she had 
nothing on Kit Yiengst. 



We are informed on good authority 
that Fishburn got lost in an automat. 



Dealer — This vase is over 2,000 
years old, sir. 

Millionaire — Oh, yeah? Don't try 
to put that stu.T over on me big boy. 
It's only 1931 now. 



Prof. Bender — What are the consti- 
tuents of quartz? 
Seiger — Pints. 



And then there was the old maid 
who sued a hotel or mental cruelty 
because they gave her a room between 
two honey-mooning couples. 

A song book containing the songs 
of Bowdoin College, and published by 
the class of 1861 was recently un- 
earthed and presented to the Maine 
Historical Society. Among the lyrics 
included in the old booklet was the 
song, '^Bacchanalian" (page Cappo) 
wjStten to the air, "Sparkling and 



Justice of the Supreme Court. If 
Rudy Vallee got his hands on this 



iota. 



The Alumnus who claims that stay- 
ln f? in college was a struggle for him 
he should see some of the modern col- 
legiate dances. 



student Browse Room. The purpose- 
of the room, according to the an- 
nouncement, will be to afford the 
students "a place to use for browsing.' 
Now the only definition we could find 
on the term, stated that to browse ifi 
to feed upon, to gra^e. In other words 
Mr. Webster applies the term only to 
sheep and cattle, which doesn't con- 
fuse the meaning for us in the least. 



The PRIVATE 



secretary^ 



IN DEFENSE OF 



JOE BASS 



If a fellow walks a girl across the 
campus, Joe Bass. If he does her a 
favor, Joe Bass. If he takes her to 
a dance, Joe Bass. If he buys her 
flowers for the Anniversary, Joe Bass. 
If he takes her to a Star Course Iper- 
formance, Joe Bass. If he takes her 
to the Junior play or a show in Leb- 
anon, Joe Bass. If he buys her some- 
thing to eat, Joe Bass. And these 
are only a few of the offenses that 
cause the epithet to be hurled at those 
guilty. It is, of course, usually those 
who do not indulge that are prone to 
shriek those words. Really they are 
not worth words of comment, but as 
space has to be filled we might as 
well prattle about something. 

The fact that a fellow may enjoy 
the company of a girl is not taken in- 
to consideration. The idea of love is 
extremely null, but it is of course 
understood that the indictment rests 
upon the males. Women, or should 
we say girls, to these yappers should 
be avoided, treated with indifference 
and held in contempt if possible. "Save 
you money," is their cry and from 
their quarter a natural cry. They 
are only a bunch of hicks and jays, 
who, may have, in a moment of ex- 
treme foolishness, invited a girl to a 
twenty-five cent movie and have liv- 
ed to regret it. 

Some men, of course, cannot afford 
W|Kten to the air, "Sparkling and it. But why should he bellow his im- 
Bright," by M. W. Fuller, later Chief pecunious position at others- Surely 



no one would invite a girl to an affair 
if he did not have the funds in his 



— ~j » aucc fe^b in o nanus un liiid *-»- 

tune, he might make a second stein pocket. Then the argument arises, 
song of it, which wouldn't improve that he should save it for a worthier 
conditions in the drought area one cause. Must we harp on fostering 



Prof. Carl Barus, of New Jersey, 
admits that some women are able to 
• te ach Math, as well as men, but are 
Physically handicapped when it comes 
;to handli 
science. 

s ttioke pipes, and when they do, they 
Wl H be ready for laboratory work," 
s ay s the naive Prof. 



ng courses in laboratory 
"Women will eventually 



Sometimes college doesn't seem 
°.uite fair, a man lives through a 
tn °usand tortures to acquire a frat 
pln and then five minutes after he gets 
s °me co-ed takes it' away from him. 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



Information from San Miguel Is- 
land revealed that nothing has been 
heard of the American seaplane, 
'Tradewind," unreported since it left 
Bermuda for the Azores last Saturday. 
Lieutenant William S. MacLaren and 
Mrs. Beryl Hart, pilot and navigator 
of the plane, were carrying a pay load 
of 200pounds to Paris. They were 
stocked with a two weeks supply of 
food. 



Amicable adjustment of the fifteen 
year old controversy between the 
Army and Navy ove r the use of the 
airplanes in coast defense was of- 
ficially announced by the War and 
Navy Departments. In effect the 
agreement restiicts the use of army 
planes to land service in coast defense, 
both at home and abroad. Thus the 
Navy Air Service is assured freedom 
of action at sea without any respon- 
sibility for coast defense. 



As a further contribution to the 
Government efforts to relieve uncm 
ployment, the Secretary of War na. 
announced agreement on a vast pro- 
gram of harbor improvements on the 
Hudson River, which will probably bi 
followed by construction improvements 
entailing expenditures of approxi- 
mately $75,000,000. The cities of New 
York and Jersey City will be able to 
erect piers to accomodate trans- 
oceanic liners of the 1000 feet class. 



A few weeks ago the University ol 
Illinois College of Medicine advertised 
for a man with a chronic headache. 
Since then there have been 750 appli- 
cants. The successful applicant is 
Theodore Roberts, 23, of Lake Geneva. 
Wis. In return for the choicest board 
and $50 per month salary, Roberts 
and room in its hospital laboratory 
has promised to prcauce a first-class 
headache fortnightly for three months. 
Roberts has had twelve years exper- 
ience with headaches. 



Lewis C. Ruch, of Brooklyn, is the 
new President of the Philadelphia Na- 
tional League Baseball Club, succeed- 
ing the late Wm. F. Baker. 



founded in 



The text — University 
J, 867 - Students gripe. ' Five in 1895. 
St udents gripe. Halls built. Students 



gripe. 



Dining Hall built. Students 
Department of Griping estab- 
in 1931. 



°t a little comment has resulted 
0ni the announcement at Hamilton 



that 



$25,000 has been donated for a 



one of man's finest emotions? 

And, no doubt, the epithet tends to 
Itlscourage those who are weak, though 
they would enjoy taking a girl "out" 
now and then. Here the name as- 
sumes a despicable connotation, as 
it prevents those persons from enjoy- 
ing themselves. The majority natural- 
ly can stand the cognomen and in fact 
teven laugh at the words, after con- 
sidering the source. 

It seems that when a man buys a girl 
a lemonade, he should squeeze it out 
of her. If he does not do so, he is 
Joe Basing her. Fortunately each 
man has his ethical and moral stan- 
dard and can usually adjust himself 
to them. To the yapper it seems 
there is only one standard and that, 
more or less licentious. 

Once in awhile a man is "hooked" 
for an Anniversary. It is, of course 
understood that only those who are 
not "engaged" are those open to this 
evil. If a person has never had a 
date before with the girl who invites 
him, he is one of the most incorrigible 
Joe Basses in existence. The fact 
that he is the chosen one of the fair 
lady who invites him is not taken into 
consideration. And also that the 
hog-callers themselves are seldom thus 
honored, though of course it is no 
longer considered an honor. Nay, 
(continued on page four) 



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ISN'T IT 

TIME 
YOU • • • 



TELEPHONED 

^Mother and Dad 

? 




I \ 



/ 



call iher.i up 



TONIG 



i i > 



Get to a telephone this . 

and give your home number to ii:e 

Operator. 

Stay on the line 'til you get an earful 

of news from home! 

Then make a telephone date witfe 

Home for a certain evening every 

week. 

You'll get a thrill from hearing 
Mother and Dad that is second only 
to seeing them. 

It's so easy to call them up — and 
costs so little! (Charges ccn be re- 
versed, of course.) 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE CO'.LEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1931 



LAFAYETTE TAKES 

OPENING GAME 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Valley fell two points short of a tie 
score. Several shots were missed neai 
the end of the game which migh 
have changed the result. 

Lebanon Valley played a fine game 
when it is considered that it was tne 
Blue and White's first contest, while 
Lafayette has already played six op 
ponents. The passing and shooting 
were good for an opener and poinv 
to success in the remaining games. 

Stewart was high scorer with fou 
field goals and five fouls for a tota 
of 13 points. Sweeney Light and Fre> 
played their positions well in holding 
down the opposing forwards. Max 
Light also looked good during the time 
he was on the floor. 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. Pts 

Stewart f 4-5 lb 

Morrisan f 

Williams f 

Orsino f 1 

Heller c 2 1 

Sprenkle c 

S. Light, g 2 1 

Frey g 1 1 

Wogan g 

M. Light g 







9 9 2'i 
LAFAYETTE 

G. F. Pts 

Sullivan f C 

Soles f C 

Adams f 2 2 6 

Thomas f 2 1 5 

•Johen f t 

Bryskewich f C 

Mermuth c 5 2 1. 

Bolch c ( 

Gilchrist g 2 

Lewis g 1 1 

Anewalt g ( 

O'Neil g C 

Cook g ( 



12 5 2. 

Referee — Bibleheimer. Umpire- 
Wright. 



CANADIAN SPEAKS 

ON PROHIBITION 



(Continued from Page 1) 



provinces. He startled many by prov 
ing, by means of figures, and by i 
report of a royal commission that cer 
tain provinces were not what thej 
were "cracked up" to be. Some o: 
those present tried to argue with hin 
but his facts were overwhelming an 
there was no argument. 



IN DEFENSE OF 



JOE BASS 



(continued from page thrve) 



nay, escorting a lady to an anniver- 
sary is now a painful duty. Gone, are 
the days when knighthood was in 
flower. 

And of course this situation can 
only become chronic in a small "Main 
Street" institution. In a city amidst 
temptations galore, i. e. Night Clubs, 
Cabarets, $5.50 seats in theatres, 
Operas, Proms, Full Dress, Taxicabs, 
Orchestras, Hotel Dinners, etc., etc. 
it cannot possibly exist. 

Well, yours for Joe Basses, better 
and bigger. 



The Student Society of the Univer- 
sity of Ulso, controlled by a commun- 
ist faction, has invited Leon Trotski 
to lecture before it on January 24th. 
The exiled Russian leader, who is now 
living on an island in the sea of Mar- 
mora, near Istanbul, Turkey, accetped. 
It is understood the Government will 



grant him a visa provided he does not 
speak of Norwegian politics. 

JUNIOR TOSSERS 

TRIM FRESHMEN 

(Continued from Page 1) 

JUNIORS 

G. F. Pts. 

Pickle f. g 3 8 

Hughes f 3 6 

MsCusker f. c 113 

Shortlidge f 2 15 

Selek c 4 8 

Lechthaler g. c 113 

Balsbaugh g 2 2 6 

Kinney g 

17 5 39 
FRESHMEN 

G. F. Pts. 

Mentzer f 113 

Rice f 

Trego f 2 2 

Lehman f 10 2 

Brubaker c 4 19 

Kondrat c. g 

Fishburn g 

Martin g 

Jordan g 

Bowers g 

Brown g 11 

Todd g 11 

6 6 18 



LOCALS THRASH 

URSINUS 33-47 



(Continued from Page 1) 



A-l SKIL* 
WORKS WONDERS 




BEFORE. "^^Igf AFTER 

ANNVILLE SHOES/ 



207 W. Main 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESSING 
KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORHAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY 

Stewart, f 6 2 14 

Williams, f 

Morrison, f 3 6 

Reeder, f 10 2 

Heller, c 8 2 18 

Shrom, c 

S. Light, g 2 2 

M. Light, g 113 

Frey, g 1 2 

Orsino, g 



20 7 47 

URSINUS 

Lodge, f 4 3 11 

Steiner, f 2 15 

Diehl, f 

Miller, c 2 4 

Paul, c 12 4 

Dotterer, g 3 6 

Eachus, g 113 

Coble, g 

Egge, g 



13 7 33 



Referee — Barfoot. 



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EAT AT ROEMIG'S 

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Cigars Cigarettes 



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RINGS 

SOCIETY PINS set with 
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PENS AND PENCILS 
DESK SETS 
BOOK ENDS 

DIE STAMPED STATION- 
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iety Seals 



SO THE JUNIORS 

GAVE A PARTY 



Saturday evenings are usually a 
lively recreation night to most people, 
but to those stranded at school over 
the week ends they sometimes prove 
quite boring. Seeing the absence of 
any scheduled activities, several en- 
thusiastic students decided that a 
party in the gymnasium might fill the 
bill, and, as a result of their agita- 
tion, the Junior class selected a 
"party" committee which cordially in- 
vited all students to the blow-out. As 
the plans were about completed the 
bottom fell out when the music com- 
mittee found that the old reliable or- 
thophonic could no longer be obtain- 
ed from its usual source. Another 
announcement called off the party. 

Then, as several hearts were well 
nigh broken, some benevolent gentle- 
man offered the use of his radio and 
the day was saved. Expecting at 
least to see the gymnasium open and 
lit, about forty students meandered 
into the building at the time set and 
looked in vain for he party. No signs 



of any decorations, chaperonesT^ 
music were to be seen, and indeed *. 
one seemed to know anything a bn 
the arangement. Some Freshmen 
tickled off a few tunes on the "piano'- 
and the girls coupled up to dance t 
dance to them. This lasted f 0r ° 
short while, and when the novelty of 
kidding the dancers from the balcon 
wore off it looked as if the party Wer ^ 
finished. Someone found a victrol a 
and a few pre-historic records which 
were played a few times until it Was 
announced that the committee was ap 
proaching. 

They came, and after blowing out a 
fuse and having several other acci- 
dents, finally connected the radio. ^ 
conglamoration of static and hashed 
music kept the party dancing until an 
early hour, when the participants went 
home. This was the party, an ill Us . 
tration of modern entertainment as 
attempted here. The fault seems to 
be two-fold — the lack of interest in 
the part of the students and a lack 
of suitable means of recreation. The 
former can only ba remiedied at the 
source, as for the latter, we can but 
talk. 



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ALL SET 
FOR SEMESTER 
EXAMS! 



VOLUME VII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1931 



No. 1G 



SENIORS NOSE OUT 
SOPHS 36-27 



LEAD RESULTS FROM 
LAST MINUTE 
RALLY 



In a very hard fought game, the 
Seniors took the measure of the Soph- 
omores last Friday evening jn the 
Alumni gymnasium. Only a last 
minute rally enabled the Class of '31 
to run up their nine point lead, the 
game ending with the score 36-27 
in their favor. 

The game was fast and hard 
throughout. Fouls were numerous 
on both sides in their attempt to break 
up the opponent's attack. 

The first half ended with the Seniors 
having a 16-13 advantage. They were 
in the lead throughout most of this 
period but with the Sophs trailing 
hy only a few points. Both teams 
fought hard the second half with the 
Senior's rally near the end putting 
the game on the ice. 

Joe Wood was the outstanding per- 
former of the evening putting in five 
field goals and four fouls for fourteen 
points. Stone was high scorer for 
the losers with eight points to his 
credit. 

The Juniors and Seniors now have 
each won a victory. When they meet 
on February 5 a hot battle is certain 
to result. Tonight the Sophomore? 
and Freshmen get together in wha+ 
should be another good game although 
the edds are in favor of the Soph? 
to take the victory. 

(continued on page four) 



"HAMLET" ATTRACTS 

ENGLISH STUDENTS 



In a most unusual performance. 
Phidelah Rice, one of the most out- 
standing monactors in the countrv. 
Rave a version of Shakespeare's 

Hamlet" before an attentive audience 
Monday evening, January 12, 1931 in 
tn e Masonic Hall in Lebanon. Dr. 
Wallace, head of the department of 
English, and several English 66 stu- 
dents witnessed the performance. 

From beginning to end, Mr. Rice held 
Me rapt attention of everyone pres- 
ent. His characterizations were ex- 
Ce llently portrayed. With only a bare 
s tage, no costumes nor accessories. 
The actor was powerful enough to 
tr ansport his audience to Elsinore 
w here the scene of the play was laid 
an d so carefully portray the parts 
that no one present was conscious that 

*te man was assuming all the roles. 
Wl s interpretation of Hamlet's char- 
acter was particularly well done, 
p^udius, Laertes, Polonius, Ophelia, 

"°ratio, all were depicted with the 
same keen touch. 

His presentation showed a careful 
j ns ight into his study of this :'mmor- 
tal tragedy of Shakespeare. Although 
glvin £ a play of this kind is always 
a stupendous task, yet Mr. Rice, seem- 
e d perfectly at ease as he recited line 
af ter H ne of "Hamlet." He seemed 

&e fairly living in the spirit of the 
°'d drama. All in all it was a memor- 
able performance. Quite a few re- 

re sentatives of Dr. Wallace's Shakes- 
continued on Page 3) 



DELPHIANS SELECT 

ANNIVERSARY PLAY 



The "Romantic Age," a delightful, 
modern comedy b y A. A. Milne, will 
be presented at Delphian Anniversary 
February 21, 1931. Are the days of 
knighthood, chivalry, and all the fairy- 
like enchantment of old English his- 
tory, but things of the past? The 
discovery Q f this last romanticism in 
our modern, every-day life is the key- 
note of the whole play. The setting 
is laid in modern England. The drama 
is divided into three acts, and con- 
tains the following character roles:— 
Henry Knowle— Wealthy Englishman 

and cheerful father of the family. 
Mary Knowle— His semi-invalid wife. 
Melisande— His charming daughter- 
heroine of the play. 
Jane — His kind, understanding niece. 
Bobby Cante— Admirer of Melisande 

and later husband of Jane. 
Gervase Mallory— The true knight- 
hero of the play. 
Ern — A country lad. 
Gentleman Susan — A travelling ped- 
ler. 

Alice — The parlor maid. 

The first act takes place in the 
hall of the Knowle's Country home, 
on a mid-summer evening. Melisande 
is tired of the practical side of modern 
life and dreams still of one who will 
come "arrayed in blue and gold," to 
carry her off to the ends of the earth. 
Jane is sympathetic with her cousin, 
but tells her it is all impossible in the 
twentieth century. Bobby proposes 
to Melisande for the second time and 
is refused; Mrs. Knowle hears of this, 
and tells Bobby that girls never know 
their minds until the sixth or seventh 
proposal. Jane sympathizes with Bob- 
by, and wins his admiration very late 
in the evening, the Knight "in blue 
and gold," who is on his way to a 
fancy dress at Collingham ,stops at 
(continued from page 4) 



KALO ENTERTAINS 
KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



ORCHESTRA IS MAIN 
FEATURE OF 
PROGRAM 



The Kalozetean Literary Society en- 
artained the Clionean Literary Society 
in what turned out to be one of the 
best joint-sessions in the history of 
the societies. 

The meeting was called to orler by 
George Becker, president of Kalo. De- 
votions were led by John Morris. Next 
the president introduced the toast- 
master of the evening, Mr. Joseph 
Hutchinson, a big man about the cam- 
pus, full of good jokes and tales of 
globe-jaunting experiences. After the 
necessary diversions, Joe introduced 
the "Kalo Jazzettes," an orchestra that 
always makes a hit— it's usually a big 
one too. They gave their interpreta- 
tion of three delightful, new numbers 
and received a big hand, especially 
from the fair sex. Becker and Snow- 
hill then gave the hall a "warm" at- 
mosphere by playing two seelctions on 
the mandolin and banjo— All that was 
lacking was the grass skirts. 
(Continued on Page 3) 



MUSIC LOVERS 
ENJOY RECITAL 



FIRST EVENT OF YEAR 
DRAWS LARGE AUDIENCE 



'jIRLo PARTICIPATE IN 

CHEMISTRY PROGRAM 



A very interesting and varied pro- 
gram was presented at a recital, given 
by students of the Conservatory on 
Tuesday evening at eight o'clock in 
the chapel. Kathryn Ru z psned v h 
program with two very lovely pian 
compositions, the fir:,t the desc. Viv 
"Pastarale" of Scarlatti, and 'ha sec 
ond Cyril Scatt's "Lento," which Miss 
Lutz played with much ease and >'ept; 
of feeling. A violin selection, "Waltz'' 
by Karl Wecher, was then featured by 
Lilliam Bauman, who proved herseli 
an able representative of the younger 
talented students of the Conservatory. 
Miss Effie LeVan then delighted the 
audience with an organ numbsr, the 
familiar "Adoration" by Barowski. 

This was followed by a group of vwo 
piano numbers by Theodore Walker. 
In the first of these the "Valse Triste" 
by Sibelius, Mr. Walker brought forth 
very competently the rhythmic quali- 
ties and deftness of touch and in his 
other number, the Polonaise ot 
MacDowell, he showed great ability 
and skill in mastering the various 
technical difficulties of the composi- 
tion. Following this Miss Mildred 
Bomberger made her first appearance, 
singing a group of three songs "To 
You"by Oley Speaks, "My Song of 
You" by Ralph Cox, and "Morning" 
by Oley Speaks. These numbers were 
sung in a very pleasing manner. 

Mary K. Goshert then played the live- 
ly Dohnampi "Rhapsody" on the piano 
after which Margaret Young brought 
the program to a fitting close by ren- 
dering with excellent interpretation 
and technical precision Bach's "Tac- 
cate and Fugue in D Minor." A good- 
sized audience was present at this 
recital and it is hoped that we may 
look forward to many more such mus- 
ical evenings in the future. 



COMMERCE CLUB HEARS 
MR. FRANK KREIDER 



The Commerce Club had the plea- 
sure of having Mr. Frank Kreider, 
treasurer of the Keystone Macaroni 
Co., of Lebanon, Pa., deliver an ad- 
dress at a luncheon held in the small 
dining hall on Wednesday evening. Mr. 
Kreider's address was based on the 
theme: "A business man must per- 
severe." His fine personality made of 
the affair a very enjoyable hour for 
the members of the club. 

Mr. Kreider also dealt with the 
problem of marketing the products of 
his company. He explained how a 
change of policy was directed toward 
increasing the American consumption 
of macaroni, rather than catering 
merely to Italian trade. The most in- 
tensive advertising campaign is now 
being conducted in Philadelphia. 



The Archbishop of Canterbury, An- 
glican Primate of England, is suffer- 
ing from a severe case of neuralgia, 
brought on by overwork, and must 
take a rest of at least three months. 



Last Thursday evening the Chem- 
stry Club held its first meeting for the 
ye^r After a few preliminary 

emarks, President Morgan briefly re- 
viewed a recent magazine article en- 
titled the "Kaleidoscope for 1930/' 
The article was a bird's-eye view of 
the prcgiess of Chemistry during the 
past year, special attention being paid 
o the outstanding developments in 
litrogen and petroleum production. 

Miss Harriet Miller, the first speak- 
er cf the evening, presented a well pre- 
pared paper on the various types oi 
minerals. She illustrated her talk 
vilh specimens of the types discussed, 
h.s feature adding a special touch oi 
reality to the talk. Miss Flo Grim 
then gave an especially interesting 
discussion of an article entiled "Hel. 
Broth." In a most realistic manner 
Miss Gri&n enlightened the club on tht 
varied dangers encountered in one oi 
our most perilous occupations of to- 
day — the business of manufacturing 
nitroglycerine. The final paper of the 
evening was read by Miss Helen 
Franklin. It was a discussion of pe- 
troleum and the rather new develop- 
ment of hydrogenation of the same to 
prepare a multitude of the fractions 
which now depend on the crude oil. 
Her article pointed out the advan- 
tages of the hydrogenation process 
and its future use in the refining of 
petroleum. Dr. Bender, at the close 
of the final number, gave a few re- 
marks on the program commenting 
especially upon the fine preparation 
the work of the evening. This was 
the first program to be given by the 
girls of the club, and they proved their 
ability to present papers of value. 

Having no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 



PHILO DELPHIAN 
JOINS SESSION 



PENNWAY OF THE FUTURE 
IS THE THEME OF 
CLEVER SKIT 



"The Pennway of the Future," was 
the theme of the program given in 
Philo Hall on Friday, January 16th 
by members of Philo and Delphian at 
their joint session. One can surmise 
from the interpretation given that it 
will be a rather wild Night Club with 
all its accoutrements. 

Eva Peck acted the part of hostess 
to the various distinguished guests, 
and introduced them to the audience 
quite pleasingly. With every Night 
Club is a fancy dancer. In this one 
she was Helen Franklin, who made 
everyone long for the days to come. 
The first guests, Mr. Hicks and Miss 
Doolittle, who were really Charles 
Wise and Trula Koch, took a table 
located in the center of the stage, and 
throughout the entire rendition inter- 
spersed pithy and pointed jokes. Dor- 
othy Hafer and Paul Keene, represent- 
ing Madam Shuman Garden and Law- 
rence Caruso, dropped in and by re- 
quest of the hostess sang the two se- 
lections, "Down the River of Golden 
Continued on Page 4) 



CUPID RESUMES 
CAMPUS DUTIES 

BARR AND CHRISTMAN 
ARE LATEST 
VICTIMS 



We hereby nominate Dan Cupid for 
the honor of holding the title, "The 
Busiest Man on the Campus." News 
has slowly filtered into the La Vie of- 
fice to the effect that two senior men 
are his latest victims. They are: 
Francis B. Barr and S. Fred Chirst- 
man. 

Mr. Barr, of Altoona, Pa., a member 
of the class of '31 and a student in 
the department of education, announ- 
ces his engagement to Miss Bertha 
Ebersole, also of Altoona. The an- 
nouncement was made on Christmas 
Day, but news of the evest did not 
reach official circles of the campus 
until this week. The announcement is 
quite a surprise to many of Mr. Barr's 
acquaintances, who thought that his 
former military experience would en- 
able him to withstand the attack of 
Eros to greater advantage than the 
ministerial students, who are essen- 
tially pacifists and have shown a ten- 
dency this year toward non-resistance. 

S. Fred Christman, of Williamson, 
Pa., a ministerial student, President of 
the Y. M. C. A., and a room-mate of 
Mr. Barr was the second casualty. His 
engagement to Miss Gladys V. Rotz, 
of Fort Loudon, Pa., was discovered 
in some manner, and by "third-degree" 
measures, details were obtained for 
publication. Miss Rotz is engaged in 
public school teaching at the present 
time, and is a graduate of the Ship- 
pensburg State Teacher's College, 
clase of 1929. 

The dates of the respective marri- 
ages have not been announced. In 
the meantime, the many friends of 
Barr and Christman offer their sin- 
cere regrets or congratulations, which- 
ever the case may be. 



LIFE WORK RECRUITS 
HEAR CONFERENCE NEWS 



The Life Work Recruits held a 
special meeting on Thursday, 15th in 
North Hall Parlor. Ruth Liller open- 
ed the meeting with a short business 
session. 

The meeting proper was opened 
with devotions led by Fred W. Mund- 
For his scripture he used James 1:22- 
72. The features of the program were 
reports of the Youth Conference at 
Dayton, Ohio. Ruth Coble reported 
-m the first half of the program, and 
Grant Umberger reported on the re- 
mainder. Robert Eshleman then made 
a few added remarks. All proved in- 
teresting as they touched the impor- 
tant phases alone, and also included 
the variety of amusing incidents and 
anecdotes which generally occur on 
the road to and at a convention. 



Thomas W. Gray of the class of 
'02 and teacher in the Ickesburg pub- 
lic schools, Ickesburg, Pa., died -Tanu- 
arv 16. in a hospital in Baltimore, 
Md. He is su v vived by Mrs. Gray, 
two daughters, and one son. He was 
buried in a Shippensburg cemetery. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 22. 1931 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

V. weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31 ... .Associate Editor 
R. Morgan, '31 Managing Editor 



RE PORTO RIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31. 
Ruth Shroyer, '32 
Hilda Buckley, 32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33.Gen*l Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 Business Manager 

P Keene, '32.. Asst. Business Manager 

C. Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. P aul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies io cents 

Subscription $1.50 "per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa , posT- 
offlce as second class matter under tne 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THE SENATE REPLIES 



We, the Senate, agree with the edi- 
tor that the "sordid mess" around the 
dormitory does not beautify the cam- 
iUg in any way. Yet, do ycu think the 
Senate should take the blame for all 
this? Don't you think a College man 
should have more pride for his place 
of abode without having any govern- 
ing body tell him what to do to keep 
it clean? Shouldn't he have learned 
these qualities of cleanliness at home ? 
Perhaps he learned none, and the yard 
at home is probably the same style as 
his grounds beneath his window here. 
But, is the Senate to blame for the 
personal cleanliness of any man? 
Emphaticaly no! Shculd w e "baby" 
eny man, tell him what to wear, and 
wash his face fo r him, if he has no 
personal sense of pride for himself? 
We can dem-nd cleanliness in regard 
to throwing "rubbish" on the campus 
but what can we do if this demand is 
disregarded five minutes after it is 
riven. There's the rub \ 

G3ttinT back to the question, we 
feel we were unjustly critized in last 
week's issue, and therefore wish to de- 
fend ourselves. We can do nothing to 
force a man to be tidy if he has no 
inclination to do so. We can ask it 
but will we get it? Nothing would 
please us more than to have all the 
men cooperate and place all garbag 
in garbar-e receptacles instead of 
throwing it out the window. But i 4 ' 
any man h^s no sense of pride for hir 
school and for himself and throws hir 
trash out the window, we, the Senate 
do not feel that 'we' should assume 
the blame or have the blame thrust 
upon us. Let's Boost instead of knock 
organiaztions. 

The Senate. 



question and should so be treated 

In the second place, the throwing of 
rubbish on the campus is not a mat 
te r of personal tidiness. It is a mat- 
ter of concern to the whole student 
body. We agree with our critic that 
the men should have pride enough in 
their Alma Mater to desist without 
coercion. If this principle applied un- 
iversally, there would be no need for 
a Senate. But that is the point. There 
appear to be some men who lack such 
pride and to make up for the defi- 
ciency, something definite should be 
done. 

"We can do nothing to force a man 
to be tidy if he has no inclination io 
do so" says the Senate. How then 
are you so successful in forcing the 
Frosh to wear white socks,- dinks, and 
black ties? "We can ask it but will 
we get it?" We are asked. When un- 
der the sun was the Senate reduced vo 
bowing the suppliant knee before of- 
fenders and begging them to "be good 
boys?" If the Senate can compel an 
underclassman to wear a hat and 
shave off his "portable-tooth-brush," 
matters which are distinctly personal, 
why can't it provide and enforce pen- 
alities for garbage-throwing? 

But enough of this. The Senate can 
and the Senate will eliminate this nui- 
sance. We observe that they have 
already taken c'.eps in this direction. 
We congratulate them for their ef- 
forts and challenge the men to stand 
by them. We know the practise is 



gentlemanly mess and refused to par- 
ticipate in society activities. This is 
the sort of rivalry that bites and de- 
vours, it is pernicious and deadly 
whenever used. 

Friendly rivalry is quite another 
thing. To hear loyal Philos and Kalos 
urging freshmen to join a society with- 
out pushing to the extreme their own 
popularity is a welcome sound to sen- 
sible ears. Then to follow up such 
sensible procedure with a friendly 
game of basketball, just to let the 
campus know that Philo and Kalo 
are still alive, that they still retain 
seme of the old-time pep — find a bet- 
ter advertising scheme if you can. 

Let's have some more of it, men. 
Foot -ball, base-ball, debates — keep 
them rolling and the Frosh will be 
fighting for admission. Show the 
campus that a Kalo can play a fair 
and friendly game against a Philo 
and vice versa and we venture to 
prophecy that your siege of "business 
depression" will be raised. 




First Star — It is being whispered 
a round that you and your husband are 
not getting on well together. 

Second Star — Nonsense. We did 
have some words and I shot him, but 
that's as far as it went. 



The PRIVATE SECRETARY 




There's a wonderful thing that they 
all Reputation — a thing that's ex- 
ceedingly hard to obtain. But once 
ou corral it, you'll find the whole na- 
tion will bow to your prowess and add 
to ycur gain. Before you "arrive" 



you are looked on with pity. The 
one of ancient standing and there- [road's mighty rough as vcu stumble 
tore difficult to handle, but, we believe j along. But after you get there they 



it can and will be conquered. And we 
believe that the Senate will make a 
name for itself by tackling the job 
and pushing it thrcugh to a success- 
ful conclusion. 



EXAMS 



The approach of the time for semes- 
ter exams raises the perennial ques- 
tion as to the actual value of these 
tests. There seems to be a way of 
compiling all sorts of statistics these 
lays. Why doesn't someone try to 
ascertain the actual percentage of 
college students who slide alon^ until 
he weeks before exams, than by 
means of cramming, manage to slide 
through the bars to a passing grade 
And thus they slide around the bases 
until they reach the home plate on 
graduation day. Yea, verily, "Slide, 
Kelly, Slide." 

Of course such students are crip- 
pling themselves; they harm no 
others. And yet their Alma Mater is 
far from benefited by their practices. 

Well, we suppose the present regime 
s the best that can Ire devised, and 
hat it will survive until some genius 
discovers a better system. But we 
do wish something couM be done to 
bring to our attention more fully the 
importance of each day's work. 



look to your ditty; applaud you and 
praise you. They're all for you— 
strong. 

You write a good story and X 

will return it. He says it won't do 
for his cheap magazine. You write 
him another and quickly he'll spurn 
it. He thinks cu're an amateur, pain- 
fully green. But once you "arrive" 
this same X will pursue you and beg 
you to write him a story or so. This 
thing, Reputation, will bring them all 
to you. How is it obtained? Say, I 
really don't know. 



SPRINGTIME IN WEST HALL 
(Used by special permission of the 
publishers, — Shortlidge, McCusker, 
and Frevola, Inc.) 
Thelma hear my melody, 
While you sit upon my knee, (Sonny 
Boy) 

As we spoon beneath the moon, 
Bidding adieu to all our gloom. 

This is written all for thee, 
And contains the fragrancy 
Of two rose buds in full bloom, 
Singing love from noon till noon. 

— Chas. Salek. 
(Note: This little jewel can be 
easily sung to the tune of "Spring- 
time in the Rockies," "Onward Chris- 
tian Soldiers," or what have you? 



Please stand by for other inspira- 
tional poems by the same young ar- 
/tists. Who will be the lucky boy to 
have a poem dedicated to him, next 
week? 



The old passes clicked against \j 
sinus and we won our first ga me 1 
the season. Now we know that w 
have the "stuff". Let's use it iw 
now on. We should bag the remains 
er of our games if we keep up th" 
old spirit. 



Cal Heller was on against our Col 
legeville opponents. He had 18 points 
— that sounds more like Cal's former 
work. — We expect great form f rorn 
our "great big man." 



Stewart con+inued his good fl 00r 
work against Ursinus and he still has 
his "eye". 14 points were chalked 
up for him. 



Morrison broke into the scoring col- 
umn with three buckets. "Moe" was 
a great player in Prep school and led 
the Virginia Confei^ence for two suc- 
cessive seasons. We expect him to 
round into shape before the Susque- 
hanna game Friday. 



Becker is a big promoter. 
"Get that Tigah!" 



Many wedding rings dissolve in 
dishwater. 



FRIENDLY RIVALRY 



The above is a replv to our edi- 
torial of last week entitled "A Wel- 
come Snow." The article was never 
intended as a jab at the Senate. It 
was intended for a criticism of a cam- 
pus nuisance, admitted to exist bv 
the Senate w'thout any attempt being 
made to stop it. Only in the last four 
lines is the Senate mentioned, and that 
not by way of criticism but to is- 
sue a challenge. In view of the na- 
ture of the above item, however, we 
take the liberty to make a few com- 
ments and ask a few questions. 

In the first place, we most emphat- 
ically do not agree that the practice of 
throwing rubbish on the campus is ac- 
quired at home. The personal clean- 
liness of the men who are guilty of 
this despicable business does not war- 
rant any such indictment of the hom- 
es from which our men come. The 
practise is locally acquired beyoni 



The challenge issued in chapel on 
Tuesday morning by "Corker" Becker 
in behalf of Kalo and promptly ac- 
cepted by "Skee" Wise in behalf of 
Philo to play on inter-scciety basket- 
all game marks the beginning of what 
may well constitute the rejuvenation 
of the society movement on our cam- 
pus. The action taken is unprecedent- 
ed so far as the memory of present 
Philos and Kalos extends. We con- 
gratulate the one who originated the 
'dea. 

The fact that the vicious rivalry 
existing between these two societies 
i few years ago was largely respon- 
sible for the present indifference and 
decadence can scarcely be disputed. 
What an orgy of handshaking, mud- 
slinging, clandestine reputation-under- 
mining and pernicious perversions of 
the truth! Small wonder that new 
men became disgusted with the un- 



They tell of two fancy choiiu men 
who strolled along the waterfront 
where one of them noticed a big, husky 
longshoreman picking his teeth with 
his knife. The chorus man; whose 
eye had cr.ught the b"g fellow, ap- 
proached him and knocked him down 
three times. Finally the longshore- 
man remained on the ground and the 
Pansy rejoined his pal. 

"For mercy sake!" quoth the other 
lad. "What made you handle that 
gentleman so roughly? You don't 
even knew him." 

"I really don't know why I did it," 
came the reply, "except that every- 
once in a while the tomboy spirit 
seizes me and I can't resist it." 



The honeymoon couple were about 
to alight from their taxi. 

"I feel so nervous, George," she 
whispered. "They are sure to know." 

But George was resourceful, "Here," 
he said, "you carry the bag." 



Sweeney Light and Earl P rey 
played wonderful at guard— their 
work is largely responsible for the 
victory. They held the much talked 
of Ursinus forwards to 16 points while 
they each scored a "bucket." 



Reeder sank a pretty shot from the 
center of the floor that brought cheers 
from the stands. Even the Ursinus 
'supporters had to give the boy a 
hand. 



A diamond is a co-ed's idea of 
a stepping stone to success. 



"Last night I dreamed you loved 
me. What does that mean?" 
"That you were dreaming." 



Why not make Helwood Brown col- 
umnist of the Congressional Record? 
If more humor isn't injected into that 
publication they'll never be able to 
sell the film rights. 



"Were you upset by the bank fail- 
ure?" 

"No, but it disturbed my balance." 

Bill — During the dance my suspen- 
ders broke. 

Mina — Weren't you terribly em- 
barrassed ? 

Bill — Not very. You see my room- 
mate had them on. 



Our old friend Albright has been 
recovering along at a breath-taking 
pace. They toppled Gettysburg, Sat- 
urday night by a 65-40 score. Gettys- 
burg has a fine team we hear — So you 
can easily see what we are up against. 
We play both teams and we want 
both games. 



Susquehanna, our next opponent, 
trimmed Ursinus 24-21 last week. 
Judging from the score they have a 
much better team than last year. 
It will take a good strong fast offen- 
sive team to beat those boys on their 
home floor at Selingsgrove — they like 
their own back yard. 



"Waiter, what on earth is this con- 
coction?" 

"Why, that's bean soup, Sir." 

"Never mind what it's been! What 
is it now?" 



When the Ozark hill-billy says he 
"rid" to town he amuses those ac- 
customed to the grammar of our day, 
but he is merely following the lan- 
guage of George Washington, who, in 
1777, wrote in his diary: "I rid to 
Muddy Hole Plantation." Further 
back, the elegant Bostonians of 1704 
not only "rid" horses, but they "riz" 
from the chains. The Ozarker who 
says he "shaked" with fever has 
Shakespeare for authority. If he tells 
how his corn "growed," he is in com- 
pany with Chaucer. Now is the time 
to hear this dialect over the radio. 
And watch your step before kidding 
anyone using it, because 300 to 600 
years ago your ancestors used all 
these uncouth words. 



"What a whale a difference a few 
scents make," gasped Speg after pat- 
ting what he thought was such a 
pretty kitty with that broad sripe 
down its back. 



The boys have two hard trips this 
week — the one on Friday night to Sus- 
quehanna and they ' journey to Phila. 
Saturday to play Temple. That's hard 
on any team — But it will be harder 
for our fellows because both games are 
on strange courts and the strongest 
opopnent comes last — We have beat- 
en Temple and we are likely to do it 
again. 



As Juliet said to Romeo from her 
balcony, "Why didn't you get seats 
in the orchestra 7 " 



"You can't imagine how happy my 
home life is," said Mae Murray re- 
cently. "You know how a little bird's 
nest is, with a papa bird and a mama 
hird and one or two little birdies. 
Well, that is the way my home is." 

Oh, google google Mttle dirlie, oo 
makes my readers dess wanna go out 
to dat dreat booful Hollywood and 
build pitty itty nesties, too. Goo 
goo! 



St. John's has been added to our list 
of home games .The boys from An- 
napolis will play here February 5th 
according to Manager Salada. Mt. 
St. Mary's will also be seen in action 
in place of Bucknell who cancelled 
owing to scholastic trouble at the 
University. 



The Sophs threw a scare into the 
Juniors but failed to come thru in 
the last minutes of play, it was a 
good game throughout. One of the 
fastest in years. The Sophs have a 
much stronger team than last yea r 
and are expected to give 
"Champs" plenty of trouble. 



The 



The colege "ice box" will be the 
scene of another hectic struggle Thur- 
sday night when the Frosh and Soph s 
"foul it out"— Both teams lost their 
initial encounters but all counting 
on victor in their second start. ^ 
your dimes ready and join the ' ra 
birds." 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1931 



PAGE THREE 



KALO ENTERTAINS 

KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



Miss Jane Muth and Russell Mor- 
gan presented a clever interpretative 
dance of the "hard" section of soc- 
iety. Both were appropriately clad 
and made the necessary wise cracks 
to convince the audience of their "old 
man's" ability in the "tough" line. 
This number received a big hand and 
deserved it. 

Miss Helen Eddy and Babe Early 
the campus crooner and personality 
man from Eweigh Teck gave a clever 
skit consisting of three musical num- 
bers and some clever dreaming on 
Babe's part. Miss Eddy was the 
dream,— entering the darkened hall in 
answer to a pleading song from the 
dreamer— but as the song ended she 
faded away— the dreamer following as 
if led on by some magic charm. Miss 
Ruth Coble accompanied the singers. 

Miss Gruber and Robert McCusker 
rendered a beautiful violin solo which 
was thoroughly enjoyed by the listen- 
ers—We have came to the conclusion 
that Bob is "holding out" onus. 

Next came the final and feature 
number on the program. It was the 
real old time square dance brought to 
life again. As the orchestra consist- 
ing of Becker, banjo; McCusker, vio- 
lin; Snowhill, clarinet; Morris, har- 
monica; and Miss Coble, the piano 
broke forth with strains of an old 
time melody four appropriately clad 
"hicks" took their places on the floor. 
They danced and danced and the long- 
er they danced the more the audience 
wanted to dance — in fact it was a real 
dance. Than taking part were Mar- 
garet Kohler, Charlie Munnert, Ger- 
trude Paul, Charlotte Urich. Ike Grant, 
Charles Salek, James Frivola and Mor- 
ton Early. 

After the program light refresh- 
ments were served and Kalo tuned in 
with the radio appropriated for the 
occasion and dancing was enjoyed un- 
til the striking of College Clock 
sounded the death knell to the much 
needed Campus diversion. 

The chaperones were Miss Mary 
Kathryn Wallace, Miss Gillespie, Miss 
'Fencil and Prof. Stakes. 



Y. W. NOTES 



A 
the 



special 
Senior 



program was given by 
girls at the "Friendly 
Hour on Sunday evening, i n Nort * 
Hall parlor. The subject for dis 

and S1 Va, Wa t W * 

and Value." Sarah Ensminger led 

Psalms"! ^ WWCh WCTe baS6d «> 
bairns on the most beautiful poetrv 

m the B iWe. Ethel Mae Hower SD0 Z 

on t he works f Milton; Q^/e 

Snelle, eJ^? £ 

as 01 wel ra th ,?T ty «* ^ion 
as well as the literary value of the 

Poetry dl scussed. Alma Binner ren- 
dered a piano solo which was much 
enjoyed by all; and Dorothy Hafe, 
sang "Now the Da y is Over." Th 
regular pianist for the evening was 

ZZ f ;, The P™*™ was diff- 
erent from the usual Friendly Hour 

discussion, but it proved to be both 

interesting and helpful. 



"HAMLET" ATTRACTS 

ENGLISH STUDENTS 



peare class took advantage of the op- 
portunity and thus saw a rare pre- 
sentation. 

An attempt will be made to have 
Rice visit the college where all those 
interested in seeing the works of his 
excellence, might do so. The name of 
Phidelah Rice is worth remembering 
as one of the greatest monactors :'n 
the country. 



Mr and Mrs. Ira M. Ruth announce 
the birth of twins, Lois Sidney and 
uavid Noel, January 10, 1931. Mr 
Ruth is a graduate of L. V. in the 
class of '23. Since that time he taught 
one year in Mercersburg Academy, one 
year in N. Y. Military Academy, in 
Collmgswood High School, Collings- 
w °od, N. J., and is now em- 
ployed in Reading, P a . Mrs. Ruth 
will be remembered as Miss E. Virgin- 
ia Smith of the class of '20. She was 
also a teacher in Reading High School 
previous to her marriage. They re- 
side in Reading. 

GIRL DAY STUDENTS 

HOLD SOCIAL AFFAIR 



The girl's day-student organiaztion, 
Sigma Kappa Eta, held an interesting 
party in the Day-Student room of 
^outh Hall, following a short business 
session at 4:00 o'clock, Tuesday. The 
program was short, consisting of sev- 
eral vocal selections by Helen Eddy 
and the reciting of several interest- 
ling poems by Lucille Engle. Both fea- 
tures were rendered in excellent form. 

An enjoyable social hour followed. 
The entertainment consisted of cards, 
dancing, music and friendly chatting. 
Refreshments were served by the 
committee in charge. 

DR. WALLACE ATTENDS 
PLAY WITH STUDENTS 



SIGMA KAPPA ETA MEETS 
TO ELECT OFFICERS 



At a short business session on 
Tuesday, January 13 at 1 o'clock, the 
Si ?ma Kappa Eta elected their offi- 
cers for the remainder of the year. 
The meeting was called to order and 
the following were elected to their re- 
spective offices: Quebe Nye, Vice 
president; Kathryn Krebs, secretary; 
•Soha Early, treasurer. Plans were 
^ade for a sleighing party as soon 
as nature provides the opportunity, 
ail( l a committee was apointed to 
Se °ut for a sleigh. The regular month- 
y nieeting of the Sigma Kappa Eta 
Society W in be held Tuesday njjrht, at 
o'clock in South Hall parlor at 
^hich time a splendid program has 
bee n arranged. 

. The Cursar of Vienna University 
I s authority for a statement that 4000 

s the average number of duels fought 
* acn year by students of the institu- 

tai. The duels are conducted in pri- 

* te . safe from the eyes and ears of 

he authorities. 



Ben Greet and the Ben Greet Play- 
ers presented a morality play of the 
15th century, "Everyman" before a 
vast audience, Friday evening, Janu- 
ary 16, 1931 in the William Penn audi- 
torium in Harrisburg. The play was 
given under the auspices of the Har- 
ris/burg Teacher's League. 

The company is an English one and 
Ben Greet is acknowledged to-day as 
the greatest Shakesperean actor. He 
is making his final tour of America. 

The play was startlingly unusual. It 
far surpassed the expectations of 
those who saw it. The lines of the 
production, though simple in them- 
selves, were given with such excel- 
lence that they seemed powerful. The 
characters such as Death, Everyman, 
Fellowship, Kindred Good Deeds, 
Knowledge, Confession, etc., each was 
so well adapted that one could find no 
flaws in the production. The costumes 
were particularly appropriate for the 
different roles. 

The action was continuous and last- 
ed one hour and forty minutes. The 
audience was asked not to applaud. 
The music was of the period. 

Through the interest of Dr. Wallace, 
several English 66 students were able 
to witness the performance. They were 
enthusiastic in their praise. 



,DR. ZIEGLER SPEAKS 

on FOR^iuN missions 

Dr. Ziegler, Secretary of the Board 
of Foreign Missions for the United 
Brethren Church visited tne campus 
on Sunday and Monday. On Sunday, 
ne spoke in the college church and on 
Monday he spoke to the Student Vol- 
unteers and to the "Y" cabinets, in 
addition to his conducting the chapel 
exercises. His theme at all these 
meetings was of course that of the 
need to support the missions. He told 
now the people of Africa, China, etc., 
are asking fo r help— money and men 
and so far they have not been able co 
supply the demand. 

Dr. Ziegler is well able to calk on 
this subject as he has spent several 
years in China and Africa and knows 
just what the conditions are m these 
places. He knows ftlil well the needs 
of the people and he is trying to heip 
them. 

There is a proposition on hand, 
which suggests that certain groups oi 
people help finance the Keeping of u, 
missionary in on e ccunry ^- unacnei 
but as yet no definite siepo tUive Been 
taken. 



Sometime between darkness Satur- 
day night and Sunday morning, thou- 
sands of tons of rock broke away from 
the parapet of the American part of 
niagara Falls. The fall is the largest 
that has occurred since white man 
knew the great cataract. It created 
a V- shaped indentation in the brink, 
estimated to be 150 to 200 feet deep 
by about 150 feet wide and beginning 
approximately 300 feet from the bank 
of Luna Island. As much rock was 
torn away from the brink of the 
world's most celebrated cataract as 
normal erosion would have removed in 
4000 years. 



President Hoover addressed letters 
to leaders in all communities asking 
them to sponsor and aid the Red Cross 
and its local chapters in the cam- 
paign for many to provide food and 
clothing for victims of the drought 
area in twenty-one states. The sum 
to be raised is $10,000,000. The fol- 
lowing day the Senate voted $25,000,- 
000 appropriation toward relief, 56 to 
27. 



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ISN'T IT 

TIME 
YOU • • • 



TELEPHONED 

^Mother and "Dad 

? 




BRIGHTEN 

this evening and 

several tomorrows! 

The cheering effects of a telephone chat 
with the home folks are much more last- 
ing than most of the Campus Pleasures. 
For several tomorrows, you will feel the 
thrill of those voices in your ear, and they 
will feel the thrill of yours. 
We are moved to use those time-tried 
words, "a trial will convince you." 
Make a date to telephone home on a 
certain evening every week. 
Just give the Operator your home tele- 
phone number and stay on the line. 
{Charges may be reversed.) 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COULEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1931 



(Continued from Page 1) 
PHILO DELPHIAN 

JOINT SESSION 



Dreams," and "Sweetheart of My 
Student Days." 

The character of the coffee house 
was further enriched by the arrival 
of Peaches and Browning, Mina Wolf- 
skill and Paul Emenheiser. For the 
uplifting (?) of the audience they en- 
acted a skit entitled, "Stockings." It 
proved very cute and witty, but the 
choice of names was unerringly asi- 
nine. Next, it was refreshing to see 
three Snowballs come flying on the 
stage in the persons of Gem Gem- 
mal, Marjorie Miller and Marion 
Kruger. They performed a few clever 
dancing steps modeled after the steps 
one takes in ice skating. Then Mar- 
ion Kruger sang "When You're Smil- 
ing." 

Francis Barr and John Rank liter- 
ally rolled in, staggering from the ef- 
fects of what the guests had been 
partaking throughout the evening. In 
a rollicking good natured way, they 
brightened the dull spots with their 
clownry. The cigarette girl, Leona 
Allen, proved a veritable hit, not only 
with the audience, but also with the 
male guests whom she quite bewitch- 
ingly captivated. She gave her inter- 
pretation of "To Whom it May Con- 
cern," and "Don't Tell Him What 
Happened to Me." 

Just when the party was really get- 
ting gay, John Hughes, a prohibition 
agent, ran in shooting a revolver. 
After taking a few patrons in custody, 
he departed, and the curtam fell. Much 
of the success of the program was due 
to Robert Eshleman, who was at the 
pi^no, always ready with a chord or 
two to properly accent the jokes, and 
who aptly accompanied the singers. 

After the program, refreshments 
were served by the Philo boys. A 
social pericd then followed in whicr 
varied forms of amusement were ir 
evidence. Some danced, some played 
games, and some, who did neither 
preformed the tete-a-tete. 



DELPHIAN SELECTS 

ANNIVERSARY PLAY 



the Knowle home to purchase somr 
petrol for his exhausted machine* h r 
gets a glimpse cf Melisande and she 
likewise, one of him. 

ACT II — Occurs on the followinc 
moming, in a glade in the wood near 
the Knowle home. Gervase is lost: 
he his been dreaming of his "prin- 
cess;" he encounters Ern and finally 
persuades him to secure some break- 
fart for him; meanwhile he meets 
Gentleman Susan who shares his 
breakfast with him and adviess him 
to get married. Melisande, out for 
an early morning stroll, again sees her 
Knight; the two meet and play the 
delightful game of "Pretending;" they 
are very happy, and when they part 
Gervase promises to come to Meli- 
sande's home iri the afternoon, tc 
carry her off to the ends of the earth. 

ACT III — Takes place in the hall 
of the Knowle's home, the ensuing 
afternoon. Bobby proposes to Jane, 
and is accepted on terms of secrecy. 
Melisande arrives and informs Jane of 
her Knight "in blue and gold." The 
romance and glamour fade when Ger- 
vase enters the Knowle home, dressed 
in his golf clothes. Melisande is dis- 
illusioned, but Gervase shows her that 
he too is disappointed, but that ro- 
mance lives on in housekeeping and 
everyday living. We leave Melisande 
poring over a cook book! 

There is much wit and humor, as 
well as genuine romance throughout 
the play; and it is hoped that the ap- 
proaching anniversary will be the 
"best-ever." The cast will be selected 
on Thursday evening, and practice 
will begin in the near founder 
the direction of Miss Mary K. Wallace 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



The La Vie staff had a meeting last 
Monday noon and reeceived a proper 
bawling out. Efficiency was demand- 
ed but not produced. You know this 
is like missionary work. Ninety-nine 
percent charity. 



impressions of him. You will agree 
that any person or organization that 
"knocks," I don't mean criticizes, 
generally falls into a degenerated 
i state. Let's keep the standard of our 
paper up to where it should be. 
Respectfully yours, 

A JUNIOR. 



Results! At last a kind soul has 
deigned tooffer a contribution for this 
column. However it is misaddressed, 
column. However it is fisaddressed. 
The author rhetorically slaps the edi- 
tor. Here it is — 
Dear Editor: — 

Your desire to fill up space in a 
hurry seems to be running away with 
your better judgment. When anything 
on the campus goes wrong the La 
Vie knocks, but justify your knocks. 
Last Saturday the Juniors gave a 
party and due to an unforeseen mis- 
hap these plans were temporarily 
frustrated. However their resourceful- 
ness came into play. A radio was se- 
cured. At first static predominated 
but latter strains of real music 
illed the air and the " flop" turn- 
id out to be a success. It was 
;he stamp of the true Junior that sav- 
ed the evening — resourcefullness. You: 
aditor did not stick to facts. He 
merely wrote his first impression. It 
would have been disastrous for Lin- 
coln if people had retained their first 




HOFFMAN STEAM MESSING 
KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WIRNA3 

10 W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



As this is contributors week we 
have another slice of the "blut wurst" 
with more vitriol than the preceding 
slice even though signed D. P. For 
your edification — 
Dear Editor: — 

In all co-educational institutions, a 
certain code of ethics shculd be en- 
forced by the common-sense and co- 
operative spirit of all students. Our 
own campus is chock-full of so-called 
Cupids who unintentionally, no doubt, 
flit here and there in pursuit of some- 
thing to talk about. 

The first part of every year is their 
heaven and it is then that these peo- 
ple are busiest. Once the match is 
started they sit back and wait for re- 
ports from time to time. What an 
idiotic pastijme! 

Beautiful and lasting friendsmps 
are formed during college years and 
fcr this reason only, is their object not 



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Ice Cream, Cakes and Pies 



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Try us for your needs, 
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SHAEFFER FOUNTAIN 

PENS AND PENCILS 
DESK SETS 
BOOK ENDS 

DIE STAMPED STATION- 
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LET'S GO— 

Buy ycur Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 

Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



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totally in vain? Aside from this, 
there is the destructive part — that of 
gaining and violating confidences and 
starting "whispering campaigns." It 
is the opinion of the writer that wo- 
men are particularly guilty of this 
offense. 

There is a spirit of alloofness among 
some of the men regarding our own 
girls — and justly so! If confidences 
are to become public property, the 
time has come for the man to crawl 
back into his shell! 

This, of course, does not apply vo 
all of the girls on our campus. When 
the "whispering campaigns." etc. stop, 
then, and not until then, will Lebanon 
Valley men show more interest in their 
fellow students at! all social func- 
tions. 

Signed, 

D. P. 

Well everybody happy? No? Good! 



Albert Joseph Alexander Kazlusky, 
the Lebanon Valley edition of the 
loquatious Lith received a long dis- 
tance telephone call a few days ago. 
Being a good friend of the person at 
the other end of the line Murphy tried 



to figure out a way so that he could 
save that party some money and end- 
ed up by speaking in Lithuanian. At 
least that's one side of the story. 
Maybe Murphy was at the paying end. 

SENIORS NOSE 

OUT SOPHS 36-27 
SENIORS 

G. F. Total 

Rugh, f 

Salada, f 2 4 

Patrizio, f 3 1 7 

Barnes, c 10 2 

Rank, c 10 2 

Wood, g 5 4 14 

Spangler, g. 3 17 

15 6 36 
SOPHOMORES 

G. F. Total 

Barnes, f Oil 

Shope, f 13 5 

Clements, f. 

Kraybill, f 

Saylor, c 2 2 6 

Krumbeigel, g 

Zech, g 

Speg, g : 3 17 

Stone, g 3 2 8 

9 9 27 
Referee — Sweeney Light. 



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LAST CALL 
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VOLUME VII 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLE GE 

ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5 1931, 



BACK 
THE BASKETBALL 
TEAMS! 



11 



BLUE AND WHITE QUINTETTE GAINS 
TWO VI CTORIES T O ONE DEFEAT 

.SUSQUEHANNA FALLS EASY PREY TO BUCKETEERS... 
MT. ST. MARY'S ALSO BOWS. TEMPLE 
SCORES LONE VICTORY 



Susquehanna 

Two victories and one defeat is 
the record compiled by the Blue and 
White Quintette in the last two 
weeks. Susquehanna and Mt. St. 
Mary's felll on their own home courts 
but Lebanon Valley had to bow be- 
fore the fast going Temple team at 
Philadelphia. 

The season's totals now stands at 
three victories against two defeats 
which is a good record considering 
the fact that all games have been 
played on foreign courts. Tonight 
the team makes its first local appear 
ance when it meets the St. John'; 
of Annapolis on the High School 
gym. A large crowd is expected to 
cheer the local team to victory. 

A t Selingsgrove, Susquehanna 
proved to be rather easy for the 
Mylin quintette as they proceeded to 
grab a 27-14 victory. The guards 
showed up particularly well in hold- 
ing down their opponents only three 
field goals being registered by them 
during the contest. 

Lebanon Valley took the lead early 
in the game and was never headed 
thereafter. Cal. Heller was in great 
form dropping in six buckets the first 
half. He was guarded closely the 
second period with the result that he 
was given numerous chances from 
the foul line. He scored more points 
than the wholle Susquehanna team 
gathering sixteen points for the eve- 
ning. 

Mt. St. Mary's 
Lebanon Valley showed a great 
fighting spirit as they staged a brill- 



BANJO ARTIST 
EXHIBITS TALENT 

Miss anne frierson 

PRESENTS NEGRO 
SONGS 



On Monday morning Feb. 2 the 
Chapel period was given over to Miss 
Anne Frierson, sent here by the Red- 
Path Bureau out of courtesy to the 
St a r Course Committee. Miss Frier- 
s °n completely charmed her audience 
a s she was all "vim, pep, and vigor 
In a very beautiful manner, she told 
W story of simple folk, the Gullah 
ne gro of the swamps of South Car- 
oli na. She told of their life, supersti- 
tions, religious fervor, and music. 

Aided by her banjo, Miss Frier- 

s ° n presented a few of the negro 

^ n gs of the Gallah Negro. She did 

hls in such a pleasing manner that 

|jsr listeners begged for more of 

. er n. However, as her time was lim- 

^ sh could not fulfill this desire. 
si re 

Miss Frierson was congratulated 
^ 0r * her well given performance by 
J^eral members of the faculty and 1 
U dents and invited to return to Leb- 
t n °n V ;v llley whenever opportunity 



iant come-back in the second period 
to nos e out Mt. St. Mary's 26-24 af- 
ter being five points behind at half- 
time. 

Lebanon Valley did not work right 
the first half and Mt. St. Mary's took 
a 13-8 lead. Coming back after the 
intermission, the Blue and White 
team rolled up eighteen points wJiiie 
holding the opponents to eleven. 

Heller and Stewart lead in the at- 
tack. Heller put in five field goals 
and sank four fouls out of four at- 
tempts fo rfourteen points. Chan- 
owski was the leading scorer for Mt. 
St. Mary's with eleven points to his 
credit. 

Temple 

Being tired from the game with 
Susquehanna the night before, Leb- 
anon Valley did not show their best 
against the powerful Temple team 
and* was forced to take a defeat by 
; a 47-26 score. The Owls started 
with a rush. Their brilliant attack 
had the Blue and White bewilulered 
throughout most of the contest. 

Stewart was the star for the lo- 
cals dropping in five field goals and 
two fouis before he left the game on 
(personals. Fitch and Beron lead the 
^Cherry and White attack with twelve 
and eleven points respectively. 

Continued on Page 4) 



McCUSKER CHOSEN 

JUNIOR PRESIDENT 

The Junior Class Officers for the 
second semester were elected at the 
regular monthly meeting held on 
Tuesday, February third. Those e- 

lected to office were: President 

.Robert McCusker;, Vi^\President— 
Ruth Armacost, being re-elected; 
Secretary — Lenora Bender; Financial 
Secretary— Ray Pkkel T.his is Mr. 
Pickel's third re-election. The class 
treasurer is John Morris. 

Besides election of officers another 
matter of great importance was at- 
tended to. The members submitted 
their list of honors, which they had 
obtained during their three years a t 
college, to the Quittie editor, Mr. 
George Nye. 



SOPHS BATTER 
FROSHJAGEMEN 

YEARLINGS ELIMINATED 
BY SECOND 
DEFEAT 



"L" CLUB INITIATES 

NINE NEW LETTERMEN 



do so presented itself. 



Nine lelttermen recently went 
through the period of fire and brim- 
stone known as initiation and emerg- 
ed full-fleged members of the Var- 
sity L Club. They were the athletes 
who received their first letter during 
the past year and became eligible 
for membership. 

It is rumored that all the terrors of 
the Inquisition were used during the 
initiantion ceromony. All the victims 
came through without the need of 
any of the stretchers that were on 
hand and the only effects noticeable 
the following day was a neat "L" 
branded on each forehead. 

President "Joe" Wood stated that 
it was the largest class ever to jain. 
the Club. Following are the names 
of the fellows who joined and the 
sports in which they received their 
letters: Earl Frey, basketball, 1930; 
Harold Wat kins, football manager, 
1930; Willard Treyise, baseball, 1930; 
Allen Shortlidge, baseball, 1930; Rus- 
sel Dennis', baseball, 1930; Tony 
Reeder, football, 1930; Joseph Vol-* 
kins, football, 1930; Russel Wil- 
liams, football, 1930; and Paul 
Kleinfelter, football, 1930. 



The Sophomores and Freshmen 
hooked up in what proved to be the 
most exciting game of the Interclass 
League so far with the Sophs com- 
ing out on the long end of the score 
by the margin of 32-22. 

The score does not indicate how 
near the Frosh came to pulling the 
game out of the fire after nearly be- 
ing swamped the first period. By a 
greatrally in the second frame they 
came to within two points of tying 
the score only to falter at the cru- 
cial moment while the class of '33 
ran up eight points. 

The first half honors went wholly 
to the Sophs. With Stone leading 
the attack they ran up a 19-7 lead. 
Coming back strong, the Frosh team 
began to click and were just as im- 
pressive as the Sophomores were the 
first half. Then with the score 24- 
22 the ultimate winners put on a 
spurt and clinched the game. 

The defeat was the second one for 
the Frosh and eliminates them as 
pennant contenders. The Sophs have 
won one game and lost one and still 
have a chance to tie for first place. 
This would result if they should de- 
feat the Juniors and the Juniors 
would triumph over the Seniors, 
president,, he repeaed his moaning 
address for the benefit of the cab- 
inet. 

Later in the evening Mr. Currier 
met with the prayer-meeting group 
in Philo Hall. He pointed out that 
prayer is the common bond by which 
all people are united, since it is an 
expression of a common struggle — 
the seach for God. He read a num- 
ber of selections from the Indian 

Poet, Rabindranath Tagre, who 
though he is not an acknowledged 

Christian, expresses the essential 
spirit of Christanity in his paetry. 

Mr. Currier's activities on Wednes- 
day began with an address during 
the regular chapel period in which 
he dealt with the disruptive tenden- 
cies present . in modern . society and 
proposed a remedy for. these tenden- 
cies. His grasp of international af- 
fairs was brilliantly manufested in 
this short, interesting and instruc- 
tive talk. 

(continued from page 4) 



RAYMOND CORRIER 
VISITS CAMPUS 



.LECTURES TO STUDENTS 
ON INTERNATIONAL 
TOPICS 



'LAST STAR COURSE 

NUMBER ON TUESDAY 



On luesaay and vveanesday ox this 
vVeeK, biuueiits on tne campus wers 
priviiegfcu io near ana coii&uu vviwj 
xtxv. ivaymonu r. currier, Hiuucauonai 
occieary 01 uie siuuent voaUrtweei 
lu'cvemenc lor iorexgn missions. xvir. 
oumer is a former Leaener ox Juu- 
ouiiege, xtangoon, Inula, ana ox 
^ j. milium Uonege, Fraiuam xnuiana 
oictte University, and is at present 
cUitor ox ".tar Horizons." 

Yviux tins backgrounu, he proveu 
lo ue a very capaoie ana sympatnec- 
ic auvisor xor suiaents, as well as 
an excellent lecturer on woria proo- 
iems in economics, pontics socioioigy 
and religion. Members of the lacuxty 
cooperated heartily with, the 1. W. 
ana Y. M. C. A. cabinets wno spon- 
sored Mr. Currier's appearance on the 
campus, by giving lectures hours for 
his use. Students were given oppor- 
tunities for) personal interviews in 
which they might be advised in re- 
gard to their problems. Tuesday 
afternoon Was particularly devoted to 
these individual conferences. 

On Tuesday at 10:15, Mr. Currier 
delivered a very capable address to 
Prof Behney's Bible 14 class in which 
ne dealt with the similarity of the 
problems of people the world over 
\and strikingly illustrated the rise of 
of various religions as a result of 
their efforts at solutions. He con- 
cluded by pointing out the adequacy 
of the Christian religion as opposed 
to the failure of other religions to 
meet such demands. 

The Life Work Recruits were in- 
troduced to Mr. Currier at a short 
meeting immediately after dinner, 
Tuesday, held in North Hall parlor. 
Plans were made for his further ac- 
tivities. His afternoon was consumed 
by personall interviews which we are 
told proved very helpful. In the early 
evening he spoke to the Freshman 
Cabinet of the Y. W. C. A., outlin- 
ing at the time a program of activi- 
ties that might increase their use- 
fulness. At the suggestion of the 

During the remainder of the day 
his time was occupied with a series 

ectures on many phases ot ... 
ternational life delivered in the lec- 
ture hours of the various professors 
who turned over their classes to 
hilm. To Dr. Wallace's English 66 
(continued on page four) 



! COLLEGE CALENDAR ! 



.Thursday Feb. 5 Boys Basket 
(ball game with St. John's 
of Annapolis 8:00 in the 
High School Gyim. Girls 
Basket-ball glame with 
Juniata at 3:00. 

Saturday Feb 7 Girls basket 
ball game in the High 
School Gym. with Ursinus 
College at 3:00 

Sunday Feb. 8 Friendly Hour in 
North Hall Parlor 5:45. 

Tuesday Feb. 10 Y. W. C. A. 



The fourth and last Star Course 
number of the season will be pre- 
sented Tuesday, Feb. 10th in Lngie 
Hall. The Cathedral Trumpeter, 
quartette of young ladies, will be the 
attraction. These young ladies are 
well talented and have established 
quite a reputation for themselves, 
having played before distinguished 
audiences over the whole United 
States. 

In combining the Cathedral Trump- 
eters with Fern Casford, who for 
many seasons has conducted her own 
company, The Redpath Bureau is 
presenting an exceptional group of 
versatile musicians and entertainers. 

Miss Casford, whose name is famil- 
iar through the tours which her own 
Company has made in recent years, 
is a personality entertainer wno 
knows the difficult art of effectively 
reaching every element of an au 
dience. She knows how to combine 
humor with pathos, and comedy with 
drama. She is able to charm and a- 
muse her audiences with her lighter 
selections and understands: how £o 
hold them enthralleld with her grip- 
ping dramatic selections. Comedy 
sketches are a memorable part of her 
program, and she adds to her plat- 
form, effectiveness by carrying a 
wardrobe of appropriate costumes. 

This number of the Cathedral 
Trumpeters and Fern Casford wili 
no doubt prove ito be a program 
which none of the student body should 
fail to witness. 



TOSSERS LOSE 
OPENING GAME 



GIRLS BOW TO "WESTERN 
MARYLAND 
36-13 



The basketball sextette of Lebanon 
Valley College suffered its first de- 
feat of the season at the hands of 
the Western Maryland team to the 
tune of 36-13. 

Yingst was high scorer for ihc> 
Blue and White while Murphy, the 
flashey forward of the Maryland 
troupe rolled up 22 points for he.- 
team. 

The game was particularly free of 
fouls Both sides showed neat 
passing and excellent floor work. Leb- 
anon Valley's attempts were greatly 
thwarted by their earnest endeavors 
to stay within bounds. This was es- 
pecially noticeable in the center sec- 
tion where Armacost and Rupp were 
handicapped in their usual game. 

The Western Maryland co-eds main 
feature was the pivot and dribble. 
It was an art that was not so easily 
blocked. Cockbum the Western Fary- 
land Captain had a most efficient 
combination of a dribble and pivot 
which could not possibly be inter- 
cepted. The guards of the winning 
team were easily able to stop the 
L. V. forwards. Yingst and Hershey 
played a fair game but did entirely 
too much passing. 

However the morale of the team 
was oly stirred to the boiling point 
and it aims to turn defeat into vic- 
tories. 



p 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5 1931. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

V weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

BDITOXZAX STAIT 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Morgan, '31 Managing Editor 

RE FORT OKI AL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31. 
Ruth Shroyer, '32 
Hilda Buckley, 32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33.Gen'l Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 Business Manager 

P. Keene, '32.. Asst. Business Manager 

C. "Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul a. Wagner, Math, .Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies io cents 

Subsc ription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
ofiiee as second class matter under uie 
Act of March. 3, lS7a. 

SPEAKERS 



After listening: to such speakers 
as the versatile Mr. Currier who was 
active on the campus during Tuesday 
and Wednesday oi this week we leei 
bound to again express our grati- 
tude to those whose enorts are re- 
sponsible tor the tine quality ana vne 
large number of speakers engaged 
this year for chapel addresses ana 
conferences. Our attention nas been 
called to many of the great inter- 
ational problems of the day m a more 
forceful manner than ever before. We 
have not only been entertained; we 
have been mentally and spiritually 
enlarged, and that, too, along lines 
that are most pertinent to the pre- 
sent word situation. We are sincere- 
ly grateful for these opportunities, 
and trust that they many continue. 



AGITATION 



Modern statisticians have devel- 
oped a large variety of devices by 
which important information can be 
clearly, easily and graphically pre- 
sented. We shouild like to make use 
of a common one, the line grapn 
fluctuating vertically, and we should 
like that line to represent the amount 
of agitation current on the campus 
throughout the year. It this be done, 
we will observe that the curve takes 
a sharp upward turn and raches the 
peak around this time of the year, 
and that it declines slowly until it 
reaches the balmy days of spring 
when it falls off sharply to its early- 
autumn level. 

I Why jthis agitation? Discontent 
— with the faculty, the administra- 
tion, campus organizations and things 
in general. But why should this dis- 
content take the form which it does ? 
Why, for instance, should the editors 
of this paper be constantly harrass- 
ed by would-be reformers who have 
o r think they have some pseudo-ser- 
ious grievance to air? Pure coward- 
ice, that's all. If a student or group 
of students feels that a pr fessor 
has bee unfair, the matte* is a per- 
sonal one and should be so adjusted. 
When it is impossible to read; com- 
mon ground in an interview, the 
Faculty-Student Council is available, 
and immediate action can be brought 
before that body. Administrative 
difficulties can likewise be smoothed 
out with justice to all only when the 
individuals concered deal directly 
with each other. Go-fbetweens can. 
avail nothing. 

It is this phase of the agitation 
racket in particular that we wish to 
treat. We are extremely puzzled at 
the many foolish suggestions of 
otherwise intelligent and earnest stu- 
dents with reference to our editorial 



policy. The conclusion seems quite 
general that a college paper is the 
official mud-slinding riot-provoking 
scandal sheet of the campus, a"d that 
a grievance involving anything from 
a tooth-pick to a pine-forest should 
be solemnly aired therein. We have 
been tempted at times to acquiesce 
in order to prove the foolishness and 
cowardice of such a procedure, but 
our sense of pride in Lebanon Valley 
traditions and of general discretion 
has restrained us. We see no reason 
why others should use us to throw 
stones which their own spineless 
cowardice prevents them from heav- 
ing. If they fear the lions mouth, 
we see no reason why we should be 
required to appease his appetite and 
thereby prepare the way for an in- 
terview. 

finally, let us say that the policy 
of this publication has been and shall 
remain conservative. Private wrongs 
must be privately adjusted. We do 
not specialize in raising disturbances. 
We do not hand out caustic and un- 
derhanded jabs a la carte). It is 
•conceivable that differences of opin- 
ion can arise between students and 
administrative authority. Neither 
party has a right to claim infallibil- 
ity. But Lebanon Valley College is 
situated in the United States of A- 
merica and not in Russia. Open 
discussion is therefore in order, noti 
clandestine attacks. Only by frank, 
personal contact can these two de- 
partments be kept in their proper 
spheres. The continued welfare of 
Lebanon Valley College demands that 
such adjustments be made immediate- 
ly, and that the present brand of 
agitation be confined to the harmless 
blowing-off of excess steam. 



A PROBLEM 



We have had the fact repeatedly 
called to our attention that the only 
known agency for the relief of our 
present ills, national as well as inter- 
ttional, is the universal inculcation 
of the spirit of indomitable good will 
that formed the foasis of the teach- 
ings of Jesus. We wonder at times 
how far cur colleges are approaching 
world problems from this angle. We 
further question if we at Lebanon 
Valley are doing all that we might 
to eulltivate this point of view. 

Great international leaders of all 
religions have accepted the essential 
soundness of the principle. Will 
someone with sufficient courage and 
vision develope a plan by which more 
positive efforts can be made to car- 
ry on this work on are own campus, 
and to cultivate thereby a more prop- 
er evaluation of things spiritual? 
We are open for suggestions. 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



At a special meeting of the Clion- 
ian Literary Society, Wednesday, 
January 21, the election of officers 
for the next term took place. The 
election resulted as follows: 
President — Alma Binner. 
Vice-President — Quebe Nye. 
Recording Secretary — Lenora Bender 
Correspond Secretary Martha Daley 
Chaplain Dorothy Snyder 
Pianist — Margaret Kohler 
Critic — Jane Muth. 

At the business meeting on Friday 
evening the newly elected officers 
were installed 1 and immediately as- 
sumed their respective duties. Alma 
Binner donned the official robe and 
proceeded with the business. Devo- 
tions were led by the new chaplain, 
Dorothy Snyder. 

A short but snappy program was 
presented by the Freshman girls. 
Elizabeth Schaak. Mistress of cer-i 
monies, announced each feature. The 



first number was a short skit, con- 
taining vocal duets, by Mildred Bom- 
berger and Mildred Nye. The pair 
gave an interesting version of the 
popular song, "Maybe It's Love." 
Miriam Book entertained with the 
reading of several humorous poems. 
The final number was a dance by ?< 
group who called themselves the 
"Mississippi Girls" — Haidee Blu- 
baugh, Charllotte Weirick, Gertrude 
Paul, Martha Kreider and Anne Ma-; 
tula. 

At the close of the program, the 
new critic offered a constructive crit- 
icism on this first presentation of the 
newcomers into the society. 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



The Philo meeting of Friday. Jan. 
23, proved that the day of the liter- 
ary society has not past. Not only 
was exceptional talent displalyed but 
also a marked attention and appre- 
ciation was shown by he audience. 

The president, Charles Wise, called 
the meeting to order, and Fred W. 
Mund, acting as chaplain, conduct- 
devotions. John Zeck opened the 
meeting by speaking on "The A- 
chievements of 1930." In his resume 
he touched on those things of inter- 
est and value to humanity. The next 
number, "Some thing that ought to 
Be Invented", by Amos Knisely proved 
very humorous, as Amos entertained 
the audience with some very remark- 
able suggestions. 

By way of music, John Rank sang 
a solo, accompanied by Joe Rhen at 
the piano. Their rendition proved so 
well liked that they were induced to 
perform again. Getting back to the 
literary, Edward Shellenberger talk- 
ed on Sinclalir Lewis. His discourse 
proved interesting and attractive by 
virtue of his interspersing witty re- 
marks and pertinent joke", mto the 
more weighty portoins, "Prof. Al- 
bert Einstein," was the rubject of a 
most instructive talk by Robert Raw- 
houser, L, V. C's, Einste'n. Not only 
was his life interestingly outlined but 
his theories were also briefly com- 
mented on. He also touched on Ein- 
stein's little peculiarities and typical 
genius-like temperaments. 

The program was brought to an 
Ad by Dwight Grove, DeWitt Essex. 
Michal Jordan, and Kenneth Whist- 
ler, who rendered a Whistlilng Quar- 
tette. However, their bird-like note^ 
•hanged to hyena-like guffaws when 
they were overcome with inward 
laughter induced by external stim- 
uli in tit© andience. After some in- 
teresting suggestions for the good of 
the order, the meeting was adjourned. 



Our fair coeds took to the road :n, 
their initial encounter for this sea- 
son and suffered defeat at the hands 
of the Western Maryland. Better 
luck next time girls. We know you 
have the material and the coach — 
every team must get started. How 
about socking the next one. And 
don't forget those Reading lassies. 
We don't want them to duplicate last; 
years performance. 



Freddie Morrison received a nice 
bit of publicity at the hands of the 
Phila. Sport writer as did Bob Stew- 
art for their laudable playing against 
Temple. Freddie held down O'Brien 
one of the fastest guards in the east 
while Boh Stewart was' sinking 
seven field goalls. 



Cal Heller found the center at Mt. 
St. Mary's a little to slow to give 
him a close run and he dropped! 
seven field goals through the 'ords, 
Cal is slowly but surely coming back 
into form. We'll see Thurs. night — 
then comment. 



St. John's of Annapolis will be 
here Thurs. night to test the strength 
of our galloping five on the home 
floor. Here's hoping we show the 
boys how its done in the Wally. We 
want victory — never mind tho score. 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



The storm has passed and 
beastly thing has laid low the 
right and stalwart. In its 



the 
up- 
take 



moans groans and pitiful cries of ag 
ony are piercing the calm peaceful 



atmosphere that once held full 



SWay 



over our campus. The storm has 
passed not all the inhabitants! Hum 
or has transpired into pathos! Com- 
edy into mellodrama! The comedi- 
ans are now remorseful and pensive ! 
Those who passed were helped by the 
"ccpyritrht" owners! Alas and alack! 
♦is an ill wind who does no good and 
♦"his babv made a Kansas cvclone look 
like a Zephrius breeze in the garden 
of Eden on September Morn. 



The most appropriate and timelv 
hailed of Exam. Week was the old 
favorite known as. "Horses, horses, 
horses crazy over horses!" 



Next Friday we tangle with F. and 
M. the boys from Lancaster 01 their 
home floor. We lost (fair or foul all 
a tmatter of opinion) to them bv one 
point last year at Lancaster and then 
nosed them out by three points in 
our home floor. Let's get both g\;mcs 
this year. O. K.? 



It has been rumored that the Un- 
iversity of Pennsylvania will put 
football in the background or at least 
on an even level with othe" sports and 
that all coaches will be faculty mem- 
bers. What do we think of that? 
Just what the followers of the ,dear 
old university think — its just a lot of 
publicity bunk to satisfy the curious 
mob that is anxious to know who 
really will coach the Penn eleven, 
next year. We can rest assured that 
no Ph. D. will be cut there in mole 
'skin Togs showing the boys how an 
off tackle play is run over a sta'.wart 
line of text books in deah old Ox- 
ford. Wait and see! 



This week is( what is commonly 
known in college circles as "The 
Hangover". It is a combination of 
rest and unrest. If you passed you 
don't have to worry and can rest. 
If you flunked you don't need rest, 
you had it! (So the profs, say) Books 
this week are ahout as useful as Bug- 
gy whips in Detroit or snow r.hoes 
; n the Fiji Isles. 



Sport Shots 



The snappy Temple quintette 
proved to be a little too much for 
our Blue and White tossers. They out- 
scored us in every department. It 
was their seventh straight win and 
our second defeat for the season. 



Susquehanna University served as 
a warm up apparent before the Tem- 
ple clash. We set the Selingsgrove 
lads down without much trouble in 
their own back yard. 



Mt. St. Mary's caught our boys in 
a carefree spirit right after exams 
and gave them a pretty close run. 
The final score was 26-24. This game 
was featured with adverse tatics 
rarely taught by the best coaches 
of today. These Maryland fellows 
must have something against us — 
they always like to "rough" it up a 
bit — 'member football? 



Our eleven will be a bunch of trav- 
eling night hawks next year it seems. 
We play at least five night games 
and they range anywhere from the 
hills of Maryland to the bleak moun- 
tains of New Hampshire. Dartmouth 
is slated as one of our opponents 
they say. When will we see the 
boys in action. All of our parents 
are not railroad employees, but we'll 
get there someway, fair or foul, (So 
sayeth a freshman supporter.) 



The female element of this school 
has razzed me terribly on account 
of my Rural taste in garments. I 
am sorry, indeed so, as I really thot 
that I was clad in the lastest of 
words in clothes. I will admit that 
my choke bored pants needed press- 
ing and that I never paid over a dol- 
lar for a nectie. Possibly the fumes 
from my shoes did resemble a barn- 
•yard on a frosty morning. These 
things I didn't resent, but when I 
donned by newest shirt and als« my 
best one Trula Koch asked me in a 
sarcastic tone, "Who won the race?" 
I got all mad and swore that I would 
never listen to a slick city salesman 
?.gain. 



The L. Club will miss the dinner 
this week because the Seniors and 
Juniors will be unable to "rough it 
up" in the "ice box". Save 'em till 
next week — there might be a double 
header — you never know what to ex- 
pect around here. 




The funeral of Miss Josephine V. 
Matulitis was held Saturday, Jan-, 
uary 31 at her home Tamaqua, Penn- 
sylvania. Miss Matulitis was grad- 
uated from Mlnersville High School 
1922, and from Lebanon Valley Col- 
lelge in 1926. Since her graduation 
from Lebanon Valley she was teach- 
ing in the West Chester Junior High 
School, West Chester, Pennsylvania, 
where she was highly esteemed by 
everyone. 



Freddy Morrison bossomed forth 
with a new Poem or rather threw a 
new light on an old metre style. Wag- 
ing for the English 26 Exam the 
other day someone asked Fred what 
a omantic Couplet was. He said 
it was two lines of poetry each line 
rhyming with each other like this: 
English twenty-six at ten 
Here we go to hell again. 
Editiors note: More truth than poet- 
ry! 



Ask Red Rugh what Prof. Ging- 
rich's dog is named ! 



Understand there is to be a big 
"Struggle" this week-end. Hope so 
as I am way behind in my Ball room 
art! I am right, I can stay right 
side up but 1 have one big weakness 
and that my feet always want to he 
introduced to my partners in an em- 
barrassing way. I feel like Leon 
Errol acts in his latest hit! Under- 
stand I am not awkward, oh no! just 
emotional! 



The A's have it also theB's. 



Well, as Dad Jenks says " oily 
war". Hope to see everyone here next 
week. Remember the sore-eyes-had- 
to-quit gag it too old to pull at home- 
Alibi's will be furnished if the read- 
er will just mail us his address with 
enclosed two cent stamp. (This ser- 
vice is free and experienced reliable 
information to be given. 

Jarvis, my gloves ! 

O. H. S. 



L 

] 

Sa 

] 

Th 

Fc 
To 

tol 
1 

thi 



bo< 
thi 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5 1931 



PAGE THREE 



so 
m 
W 
ss 
be 

M- 

on 
;r j 
ist 



ny 

id- 
le, 
id- 
it !i 

St' 

ble 




^ style correspondent from Shang- 
hi 

g a ys that clothes are getting so dang- 
hai, 

That its not a fox pass 

For ladies in grass 

To walk on the streets in Shanghai. 



Salesman — Here is a very nice pis- 
tol, lady. It shoots nine times. 

Fair Customer — Say, what do you 
think I am, a pollygamist? 



An egotist is one who reading a 
book and not understanding some- 
thing in it, decides it is a misprint. 



The height of optimisim — Looking 
in the cuckoo clock for eggs. 



It was somewhere in Italy back 
in the blackest of dark ages. 

"Your Highness," announced a 
court attendant, "an American boot- 
legger has just arrived at the palace 
with a supply of choice American 
booze." 

The eyes of Ceasar Borgia lit up 
with a new unholy light." 

"Show him right up," he chortled. 
"My old reliable stock of poisins 
hasn't been funtioning at all satis- 
factorily of late." 



TARY 



jThePRIVATE SECR 

He is a popular man around col- 
lege, popular though he dosen't be- 
long to any fraternity or honorary 
society. He never has a pal, nor does 
he travel about with a certain group 
of friends, but always comes and, 
goes alone, attending his duties and 
standing aloof from the rest. He is 
looked upon by many with pity and 
by others with scorn. Yet others, 
more kind-hearted, pass pleasant 
words with him, but the stage of true 
friendship is never reached. Des- 
pite all this, he is still popular. Yes, 
as •popMfar as any college janitor 
ever could be. 



Ann Agusta — I used to think you 
were dumb. 
'Betty— Really? 

A. A. — But I wasn't sure of any- 
thing in those days. 



Two may live as cheaply as one, 
but not nearlly as quietly. 

She's got personality. That's what 
I like about her. She's beautiful, 
too. She's blessedly quiet but never- 
theless she's got enough pep to suit 
me. I admire her because she doesn't 
smoke, but in other ways you could 
hardly call he r old-fashioned. 

In fact, she's a darned good sport 
— ready to go any crazy place you 
think of at anytime of the day or 
night. She has charm, grace, chic. 
She's up to up to date in every way 
and yet possesses the more solid vir- 
tue of her predecessors in popularity. 
But, above all, she's got personality. 
That's what I like about her. 

Others seem to like her too. I was 
told today that I couldn't get de- 
livery on her for more than two 
months. 



Brute— Why didn't you get your 
pants pressed? 

Johhny — I couldn't. 
B— Why? 

j_W e ll, every place I'd come to 
would have a sign, saying, "Trousers 
Pressed Inside." 
B.— Well ? 

J.— I wanted mine pressed on the 
outside. 



Mrs. Washington — You'd \ better 
watch the cherry trees this morn- 
ing. 

Mr. W.— Why? 

Mrs. W. — Little George has a 
hacking cough. 



An undertaker in London who ad- 
vertised free funerals for all suicides 
has been arrested and charged with 
contributing toward the extermina- 
tion of the Scotch race. 



"Is she pretty modest?" 
"Well, she's pretty." 



Love — the delution that one wom- 
an differs from another. 



"What was that joke about that 
*e prof told in class?" 
"I don't know. He didn't say." 



If peanuts sold for ten cents a 
Pound and steamboats sailed on rol- 
' er skates, how many lollypops 
w °uld it take to paint the dome of 
the Capital Building at Washington? 



a pair of red flannels and a quart of 
aged-on-the-way-corn. 

He had spent four years at Boyn- 
yae and is now ready to depart with 
his sheepskin tucked beneath one 
arm. As he mends his way through 
the throng at the station his thirty 
inch trousers excite numerous dero- 
gatory remarks from those who stu 
ble over them. He wears a baggy 
suit of uncertain color, his shirt is 
the latest thing from the looms of the 
Tomahawk Factories, his cravat 
would put to shame a Summer sun- 
set, and his chapeau is the newest 
creation from the nocks Hatters and 
Lingerie Co. A redcaps follows be- 
hind him carrying two handsome 
bags which contain eight quarts of 
aged-in-the-kjeg-corn. 

Two weeks pass and we see our 
weary hero dressed in a rough cos- 
tume of denim .gazing about over 
Gods's wide open spaces. A hundred 
feet of film glides by and ye see 
him see him rise slowly, gvasp two 
pllow handles firmly and creep ott 
the stage to the left. 




A pun is a joke at which every- 
one groans because he didn't think 
of it first. 



Dr. and Mrs. Reynolds entertained 
the assistants of the Educational De- 
partment at a dinner on Wednesday 
evening, February 4th. at their home 
on Main Street. Gloria LaVenture, 
Dean S a lada and Dorothy Thompson 
were the assistants entertained. The 
evening is reported to have been a 
most enjoyable one. 



Due to extreme pressure, Mr. Hen- 
ry Ford, of Michigan, has promised 
to bring out the Collegiate Model 
Coupe. The current model has its 
instument ( ? ) board placed to the 
rear entirely to far. 

In the words of the co-ed who was 
the fourth passenger: "Where 11 I 
put my legs? Out the window?" 

A later dispatch further states that 
the Collegiate Model Coupe will have 
a seat four inches wider and will 
have the instrument board cut away 
to enable six to ride inside. Also, 
Ithe rear deck will have footholds 
cut for two cafmp stools so the ca- 
pacity of this deluxe creation will be 
eight. 



A series of delightful informal tea 
parties is in progress at the present 
time amoung various members of the 
faculty. Mrs. Green entertained on 
Tuesday evening in North Hall, while 
Miss Leitzan will return the favor 
in South Hall on Wednesday evening. 



Wealth has wings, but it doesn't 
have any tail you can put salt on. 



He came to college wearning fif- 
teen inch trousers, a white shirt am- 
tply decorated with purple polka 
dots, yellow shoes that turned up 
abrupt at the toes, a suit of green- 
ish hue, and a straw hat, resplen- 
dent with an orange band, balanced 
precauriously on his tousled mop. He 
carried an imitation Heather suitcase 
in which reposed one extra collar, 



M'andy, what foh is you goin' in- 
ter dat beauty parlor?" 

Go long, big boy, an' lemme 'lone 
is goin' ter et me a permanent 
str aight." 



Hoffman steam pressing 
keystone hat cleaning 

STEVE WORNAS 

10 W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



PRINTING— 

Stationery, Announcements. 
Publications, Catalogues, 
Booklets, Etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO- 



Annville 



Penna, 



THIS IS A QUALITY SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

Service, Workmanship and Materials 
Hand Stitching 

W. D. ELLIOTT, JR. 

140 N. Railroad St., 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



On Monday, January 26, while the 
campus was in the midst of Semester 
examinations, the home of Dr. Paul 
Wagner, head of the department 
of mathematics, was gladdened by 
the arrival of a daughter, Virginia 
Anne. The new arrival and her 
mother are reportel to be doing 
splendidly, and their return from the 
Lebanon hospital is anticipated in 
the course of the week. 

The campus welcomes this latest 
addition to its ranks, and extends 
to Dr. and Mrs. Wagner full pardon 
for any pride which h a s been or 
may be evinced in Virginia Anne, a- 
long with its heartiest congratula- 
tions. 



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Wm. Penn Highway, 4 Miles West of Lebanon, Pa. 
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Special Dinners and A La Carte Service 
Ample Parkins: Space We Sf»rve With a Smi'e 




KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASH5 R 

COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, Pa. 



SHEET MUSIC MUSICAL BOOKS 

MUSICAL GOODS VICTOR RECORDS 

VICTOR RADIOS 

Miller's Music Store 



738 Cumberland Street, 



Lebanon, Pa. 



ISN'T IT 

TIME 
YOU • • • 



TELEPHONED 

^Mother and "Dad 




and you'll be there! 

Go to the nearest telephone tonight, 
give your home telephone number 
to the Operator — and in a moment 
or two you'll be hearing the latest 
news from home. 

It will be a thrill you'll want to re- 
peat. Before you hang up make a 
"date" to call them up again some 
night next week. 

It's so easy to make the call and costs 
so little ! 

(Charges can be reversed, for that 
matter.) 





PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE CO^LEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5 1931 



L. V. PASSERS WIN 

AND LOSE 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Lebanon Valley 





G 


F 


p 


Stewart F. 


1 


I 


Q 
O 


Morrison F. 


1 


1 




Williams F. 





1 


I 


Reeder F. 











Heller C. 


6 


4 


16 


Fernsler C. 











S. Light G. 


1 


1 


3 


M, Light G. 





1 


1 


Frey G. 











Orsino G. 













9 


9 


27 


Susquehanna 








G 


F 


P 


Kubis F. 











Quimmel F. 





1 


1 


Yan Nys F. 





1 


1 


Fisher C. 


1 


1 


3 


McGeehang G. 


2 





4 


Glenn G. 





5 


5 


Kozak G. 













3 


8 


14 



Refree-Lehman. 
17-10 L. V. 



Half-time score 



Lebanon 


Valley 








G 


F 


P 


Stewart F. 


3 


1 


7 


Sprenkle F. 











Morrison F. 











Fernsler F. 





1 


1 


Heller C. 


5 


4 


14 


S. Light G. 





1 


1 


Frey G. 


1 


1 


3 


M. Light G. 











Orsino G. 













9 


8 


26 


Mt. St. 


Fary's 








G 


F 


P 


Siencywjef F. 











Chanowski F. 


4 


3 


11 


Zubras C. 


1 


1 


3 


Hopkins C. F. 


1 


1 


3 


Connel G. 











^Byscavage G. 











Bonner G. 


2 


1 


5 


Edllen G. 


1 





2 




9 


6 


24 


Referee-Bowman 








Lebanon 


Valley 








G 


F 


P 


Stewart F. 


5 


2 


12 


Morrison F. 


1 


1 


3 


Aibrams F. 











Williams F. 











Heller C. 


3 





6 


Fernsler C. 











S. Light G. 





1 


1 


M. Light G. 











Frey G. 


1 





2 


Orsino G. 


1 





2 




11 


4 


26 


Temple 








G 


F 


P 


Fitch Fl 


5 


2 


12 


Eisley F. 


1 





2 


Goldberger F. 


3 





6 


Gudd C. 


4 


1 


9 


Lelejian C. 





1 


1 


Beron G. 


5 


1 


11 


O'Brien G. 


1 


4 


6 


\ 


19 


9 


47 



students on the subject: "The Signif- 
icance of the Ghandi Movement in 
India". In all of these sessions, Mr. 
Currier exhibited a truly phenom- 
enal versatility and a most remark- 
able grasp of international problems. 

Mr. Currier completed his stay on 
the campus by appearing before a 
joint meeting of the Life Work Re- 
cruits and the Y. M. and Y. W. C. 
A. Cabinets at 6:00 in North Hall 
parlor. At this time he treated more 
specifically the needs for foreign 
mission work and the prerequisits of 
those who wish to enter this field. 
This final message was very inspir- 
ing, and practical. 

Throughout his stay, Fr. Currier 
was thoroughly appreciated by stu- 
dents and faculty alike. His contri- 
butions to their knowledge of world 
problems was most noteworthy. He 
was especially successful in intro- 
ducing a number of excellent volums 
dealing with many of the questions 
discussed. It can scarcely be doubt- 
ed that his visit has awakened a new 
interest in the people of other lands 
and of other races. 



GIRLS BASKETBALL 

SCHEDULE ANNOUNCED 



The prospects for the girls' bas- 
ketball team loom bright for the 
coming season. Although the fast- 
moving sextette has suffered a de- 
feat in its first game, there are 
seven other contests ahead in which 
to show its team work. 

The squad has been practicing 
faithfully for the past six weeks- 
There is a good supply of new mater- 
ial in the way of freshman girls. 
From last year's squad there are 



Refree-Rumsey Umpire-Kelly Half- 
time score-Temple, 23, Lebanon Val- 
ley, 12. 

RAYMOND CURRIER 

VISITS CAMPUS 



fm 



A -l SKTL* 
WORKS WONDERS 




BEFORE 



ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 

207 W. Main 



several luminaries. Yingst remains 
as star-forward. As excellent team 
mates "Kit" has Gladys Hershey and 
Marian Miller. Gem Gemmel, Anna 
Matula, Caroline Fischer, and Viola 
Williams are also trying for berths 
as the "score-makers", 
i Rupp andl Fields, outstanding 
guards from the past year are striv- 
ing hard to maintain their positions 
against the neat playing of two new 
incomers, ' Emily Brandt and Char- 
lotte Weirick. Both these two guards 
have done some very commendable 
playing. It remains to be seen how 
they "show" in the games. Shroyer 
and Fauth are also in the line to 
block the forwards. 

Ruth Armacost is exhibiting her 
same good work as side-center. An- 
na Krebs and Minni Wolfskeil are 
j/anning her close competition. In 
the center ring M'ary Gossard, Doro- 
thy Forry and Ellizabeth Engle are 
battling to determine who shall be 
the center for L. V. C. 

All in all the material looks very 
promising and Miss Fencil in quite 
optimistic about the outcome of the 
season's games. Miss Fencil has 
spent much time and perseverance 
in coaching the co-eds for their com- 
ing tilts on the basketball courts. 

Ruth Shroyer as manager af the 
team, has arranged a rather "stiff" 
schedule for the season but the out- 
look is very promising. 

The season's schedulle is as fol- 
lows: 



Feb. 5 Juniata 

Feb. 7 Ursinus 

Feb. 13 Cedar Crest 
Feb;. 14 Western Maryland 

Feb. 19 Albright 
Feb. 27 Juniata 

Mar. 7 Albright 



home 
home 
away 
home 
away 
away 
home 



The manager is attempting to ar- 
range a trip through Virginia and 
Maryland but as yet the plans have 
not been completed. 



YEARLINGS ELIMINATED 
BY SECOND DEFEAT 



(Continued from Page 1) 



SoPhomores 





G 


F 


P 


Barnes F. 


1 


1 


3 


Krabill F. 


1 





2 


Stone F. G. C. 


4 


1 


9 


Clements F. 





3 


3 


Saylor C. 


2 


1 


5 


Shrope G. C. 


1 





2 


Speg G. 


3 
12 


2 
8 


8 
32 



H. GOODMAN SONS 

29 W. Sheridan Ave. 

Real Refreshments in a 
Real Way 
Ice Cream, Cakes and Pies 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



Grimms Book Store 

Try us for your needs 
RINGS 

SOCIETY PINS set with 
Pearls 

SHAEFFER FOUNTAIN 

PENS AND PENCILS 
DESK SETS 
BOOK ENDS 

DIE STAMPED STATION- 
ERY with College or Soc- 
iety Seals 



LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 

Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



H. W. MILLER 



Annville 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Pa. 



MENS 

Horse Hide Leather Coats, Shoes 
Underwear, Sweaters Srirts and 
Ties. 

LADIES 
Silk Undies, Slk Hose, Stap Sand- 
als, Pumps, Gloves. 
COURTESY — SERVICE 

J.F.BERLEW 

9-11 West Main Street. 
Annville, Pa. 



(Continued from Page 1) 



students, he spoke on Asiatic Litera- 
ture, dealing in particular with In- 
dian poetry. He next conducted an 
informal discussion on the Machine 
Age and its application to India in 
one of Prof. Stevenson's history 
periods. Before the Economics class 
of Prof Stokes, he treated in a mas- 
terful way the present world econo- 
mic situation. Later in the day he 
addressed Prof. Gingrich's Sociology 



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A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTR if DAILY 



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Contractors 

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ANNVILLE. PA. 



Freshmen 





G 


F 


Mentzer F. 


3 


2 


Trego F. 


2 





Lehman F. 








Fishburn F. 








Brubaker C. 


1 


6 


Bowers G. 


1 





Todd G. 








Martin G. 








Kandrat G. 








Shirk G. 










7 


8 



4 


8 
2 





22 



With the aid of medical science 
and his own determination, Booth 
Tarlington h a s fought his way back 
from total blindness to the beauty 
of light. His fight for life started 
fourteen years ago, and during that 
time he became totally blind. Today 
he can again distinguish color and 
form. 



Sandwiches ^oclas 

EAT AT ROEMIG'S 

ICE CREAM 
ci & ar s Cigarettes 
DELICIOUS HOME MADE 



Chefs 

House of Good 
Foods 

Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 




Meals Served at All Hours 

Our Specialty 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 



For Quality 

BAKED PRODUCTS 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



NEW LINE OF FROCKS 
AND GOWNS 

Rose Singer Shoo 



761 Cumberlad Street, 



Lebanon, Pa. 



—Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens - 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

TJ A nprj 9 o The Gift Store of Lebanon 
JirVrVI^ryJ^ ^ 757-759 Cumberland Street 

Special Rate on Portraits to Students 



A 

Set] 
offic 
P 
\ 
S 
T 
of . 
a s 
^a s 
c ap! 
b 6 , 

sent 



CAMERA SHY? 
FOR QUITTIE'S SAKE ! 
SNAP OUT OF IT! 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



MORE 
POWER TO OUR 
"BUCKETEERS"! 



VOLUME VII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1931 



No. 12 



PHILO DRAWS 
FIRST RLOOD 



TRADITIONAL . FUED 
BROUGHT TO 
HEAD 



IS 



BEHNEY SPEAKS TO 

LIFE WORK RECRUITS 



Jn a game about as rough as a 
basketball game can be, tne Philo- 
kosmian Literary Society defeated 
the Kaleyetean Literary Society by 
the score of 29-23 in the first athlet- 
ic contest known to have been staged 
between the two societies. The game 
was played on Monday night in the> 
Alumni Gym. 

Reeling ran high as {first Philo 
then Kaio and finally Philo forged 
into the lead. The gallery was crowd- 
ed with partisans of the teams who 
cheered heartily for the players. 

All predections as to the type of 
game were fully born out as the 
contest rapidly became a rough-and 
tumble attair. Patrizio called the 
plays close the first half with the 
result that the game looked like a 
foul-shooting contest. The second 
half h e left the fray take its own 
course and the spectators witnessed 
some first class action. 

Philo won the game by their ag- 
gressiveness and ability to keep on 
the ball. Brubaker invariably got the 
tipoff while his teammates were us- 
ually able to outjump their oppo-i 
nents in a toss-up. They presented 
and iron-man combination using no 
substitutes. 

Phillo was first to draw blood 
when "Red" Rugh put in a field goal. 
Ballsbaugh added two fouls before 
Stone started the scoring for Kalo 
with a free toss. Philo kept up their 
ei kl of the first quarter. 

The second period was wholly 
Kalo's. Four buckets and one foul 
rained into the basket while the Philo 
team was ineffectively trying to find 
the hoop. At hallf time the game 
hoked as if it would be a K a lo vic- 
tory. 

The second half was quite differ- 
ent with first one Philo player and 
5 en an °ther getting loose for a shot. 
They continued .until they had an 
fteven point lead. At this stage Kalo 
j^aced and started a comeback but 
ne margin was too great to over 
come. 

"Red" Rugh and Brubaker werei 
scorers with nine and eight 
Points respectively Pickle was high 
0r Kalo with six points. 



Morgan is elected 

senior president 



At a meeting, last Thursday, the 
"fciar Class; elected the following 



offl cers for the last semester:. 
Resident, Russell Morgan. 
Vice-President, Marie Ehrgott. 
Secretary, Edna E a rly. 
ine class also discussed the idea 
^ain having a play coached by 
student and Miss Caroline Fisher 
c as elected by the class to act in the 
^pacity of the coach. The play will 
announced soon and will be pre- 



of 



The Life Work Recruits met for 
their regular meeting in North Hall 
Parlor on Thursday, February 5. Af- 
ter a short busines meeting in which 
plans were made for cooperation, 
with the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. 
A. along the line of World Fellow- 
ship, the meeting proper was opened 
by Paul Emenheiser. He conducted 
devotions by reading Matthew 12 
and by offering prayer. 

The speaker of the evening was 
Professor J. Bruce Behney. He gave 
some very pointed suggestions on the 
subject, "What of Christ." After his 
talk, he conducted a discussion where 
in the various phases of his talk was 
discussed. Though short, the meeting 
was both interesting and instructive. 



DER DEUTSCHE VEREIN 

METS IN SOUTH HALL 



Der Deutsche Verein met on Mon- 
day evening at 7:30 in South Hall 
Parlor for a short business meeting, 
followed by an hour of entertain- 
ment. The distribution of addresses 
for correspondence with Germans 
was the main item of business. A 
skit entitled "Eine Kaffie Klatch" 
and featuring Ethel May Hower, 
Edna Early and Marie Ehrgott as 
three German oldmaids lamenting 
the defects of the modern age was 
the first number on the program. 
German games under the direction 
of Margaret Paris followed. Dr. 
Lietzan concluded the program by re- 
lating some of her interesting exper- 
iences abroad. 



JUNIORS RETAIN 
CHAMPIONSHIP 

^HARD FOUGHT CONTEST 
CLINCHES CAGE 
SERIES 



Se nted 



- to the campus in the near fu- 



With a big second half rally the 
Juniors downed the Seniors in the 
Aluimni Gym on Wednesday evening 
and went into first place in the In- 
terclass League. The final score was 
30-25 in favor of the class of '32. 

With two victories and no defeats 
the Juniors have yet the Sophomores 
to defeat in order to retain the 
championship they won last year. If 
the Sophs beat the Juniors a three- 
way tie will most likely result. 

The game between the two upper 
classes was the roughest seen on the 
court this year. It resembled a foot- 
ball game more than a basketball 
contest. 

The Seniors led throughout the 
entire first half and at the end of 
the first twenty minutes of play they 
held a 14-8 margin. In the second 
half the Juniors gradually pulled up 
and took the lead. The feature shot 
of this rally was McCusker's toss 
back over his head which found the 
center of the basket. 

Shortledge was the leading light 
in the second half, coming through 
with shots at the times when they 
were most needed* His ten points 
were the most gathered by any play- 
er during the evening. "Joe" Wood 
was high scorer for the Seniors with 
eight points to his credit. 



GLEEMEN OPEN 
1 931 SEASON 

SINKING SPRINGS IS 
SCENE OF FIRST 
CONCERT 



The Men's Gle e Club made its in- 
ital 1931 performance at Sinking 
Springs, on Wednesday night. The 
Club have a very fine program which 
aroused much comment on the part 
of the audience. 

The numbers rendered by the club 
were especially enjoyed as also were 
the solos by Walker, Snowhill, and 
Horn. 

The skit seemed to take very well 
and although it is of a deeper type 
than heretofore produced yet it was 
enjoyed by all who heard it. 
The program was as follows: 

Alma Mater Spessord-Lehiman 

Cornfield Melodies Gates 

In the Luxenbourg Gardens 

Manning-Nash 

Glee Club 
Piano Solo.... Valse Triste.— Sibelious 

Polonaise MacDowell 

Out of the Night Ellis-Nash 

The Old Road Scott 

Trees Rasback 

Glee Club 
Choosing a career .... G. A. de Aillavet 
Adopted from Clark's Translation 
Farce in one act 
The cast 
(continued on page four) 



L. V. CLIPS ST. 
JOSEPHS' WINGS 

HELLER AND STEWART 
BEAR BRUNT OF 
ATTACK 



Last Thursday night Lebanon Val- 
ley came out victorious in their first 
home game by defeating the St. 
John's of Annapolis 36-34. The crowd 
that came out to cheer the Blue and 
White was treated to a great game 
of basketball as St. John's presented 
one of the strongest teams that the 
local quintette will meet this year. 

Heller and Stewart, as usual car- 
ried the brunt of the attack. Heller 
had an "on night" in foul shooting 
and sank nine shots out of thirteen 
free tosses. Stewart put in seven bas- 
kets from the field three of them be- 
ing tapped in after one of his team- 
mates had missed a foul shot. Both 
of these men were in the thick of 
the fight all the time and played 
throughout the whole game. 

Lebanon Valley started functioning 
from the very beginning and ran up 
eight points before St. John's got 
their bearings. They had great dif- 
ficulty in sholving our defense and 
although they had the ball most of 
the time, they could not work the 
ball in position for shots at the* bas- 
ket. After taking time out they came 
back with a rush and pulled up to 
within two points of the local team. 
The score remained close until near 
fhe close of the first half when Leb- 
anon Valley again put on a spurt 
(Continued on Page 3) 



FROSH HOLD PARTY 

IN ALUMNI GYMNASIUM 



The Freshman Class entertained 
the students and faculty with an in- 
formal party in the Alumni gymna- 
sium last Saturday evening. Dancing 
began at seven thirty, music being 
furnished by the Orthoplivnic "or- 
chestra" under the personal direction 
of Mr. Charles Meyer. With the 
Frosh personality man George Snow- 
hill acting as master of ceromonies 
a delightful program was presented 
during a brief intermission. Miss 
^eien Franklin rendered a clever 
^ance number accompanied by Miss 
Gem Gemmel at the piano and a vo- 
cal selection by Jerry White, the 
W alley s Contribution m the way oi 
male crooners to the appreciative 
public. 

Miss Leona Allen once again de- 
lighted ner listeners witn two very 
good selections "To Whom It May 
ooncern" and "Saint Louis Blues' 
Miss Allen a newcomer to Lebanon 
Valley this year has won a place in 
all the hearts of the campus with her 
marvelous voice that makes the 
•'blues" "bluer". Next Miss Martha 
Kreider, accompanied by Miss Gem- 
ble sang two popular numbers, thus 
completing the program for the 
evening. 

Dancing was resumed and spirit 
ran high for the remainder of the 
evening. Myer's music became bet- 
ter (new needle perhaps) and all 
was at the very height when the 
soft slow, mornful tones of "Mem- 
ories" filled the crowed gym. sound- 
ing the death knell to the diversion. 
Yes, we have memories of the de- 
lightful time we had at the expense 
of the Frosh. It was a marvelous 
party and long may the habit live ! 
Nice work Frosh. Why not more par- 
ties? 



W. S. G. A. HOLDS 
VALENTINE PARTY 



FRESHMAN GIRLS ARE 
ENTERTAINED AT 
BRIDGE 



The W. S. G. A. entertained the 
new girls of Lebanon Valley College 
to a delightful Valentine bridge in, 
North Hall Parlor, Wednesday even- 
ing, February 11th at eight o'clock. 

The parlor was fittingly decorated 
in honor of St. Valentine. The girls 
indulged in dancing until the group 
assembled. Bridge was the preferred 
game of cards but other favorites 
were not slighted. About thirty 
girls took advantage of! the social 
hour. Mrs. Green and Miss Myers 
were honored guests at the affair. 

After the young ladies had shown 
their skill in handling the cards, the 
members of W. S. G. A. served de- 
licious refreshments. All who were, 
present voted it a most successful 
evening. 



FAIR TOSSERS 
WIN AND LOSE 

URSINUS IS VICTOR; 
JUNIATA FALLS 
27-25 



The swift-moving team of Ursin- 
us ran rough-shod over the giro's 
basketball team of Lebanon Valley 
College, Saturday afternoon, Feb, 
7th in the Annville High School 
Gymnasium with the score of 31-21. 

Throughout the entire game the! 
Ursinus sextette was in the lead and 
only once was their apparent victory 
threatened when the Annville team 
made a tremendous effort to forge 
ahead and succeded in making their 
score only four less than that of the 
Ursinus stars. However, the Coilege- 
vill e representatives succeeded in 
swelling their score considerably in 
the last few minutes of the game. 

The passing and shooting of the 
Ursinus girls was especially com- 
mendable. The difficulty on the part 
of the Annvilli a ns seemed to be the 
forwards' failure to make their shots 
good. Yingst played her usual good 
floor game but her shots were "off" 
Miller placed several nice shots in 
the second half of the game. Hershey 
and Armaeost played a neat defen- 
sive game in the center ring. Weirick 
did some close guarding and was able 
to keep Connor, star forward of Ur- 
sinus to only three baskets. Strickler 
was the outstanding "shot" on the 
Ursinus team. 

In a closely contested game, the 
Lebanon Valley basketball sextette 
nosed out the fast-moving Juniata 
'ine-up on the Annville High School 
floor, Thursday afternoon, Feb. 5th, 
1931 by a two-point victorv. 

From beginning to end the out- 
come was not quite certain. The star 
Continued on Page 4) 



FINAL STAR COURSE 

NUMBER IS PRESENTED 



The final Star Course program for 
the season, The Cathedral Trumpe- 
ters and Fern Casford, proved to be 
a success as far as real entertain- 
ment was concerned. Each member 
of the company proved to be a real 
artist in her own particular line. 

Miss Casford cleverly presented a 
number of humorous readings which 
were especially pleasing to her au- 
dience. Her technique was very good 
and she spoke very clearly and dis- 
tinctly, which made her presenta- 
tions all the more delightful. 

The instrumentation of the Trump- 
eters was ideal, and quite different 
from that found in the ordinary com- 
pany. The soft tones of the horns 
were brightened by the more bril- 
lilant notes of the trumpets, produc- 
ing a colorful and delightful blend- 
ing of tone. Each member of the 
quartette played several instruments 
and did equally well on all of them. 
By the solos given on various instru- 
ments, the company displayed unu- 
sual talent. Judging from the ap- 
plause, the selections of these younq; 
ladies were well appreciated and en- 
joyed by the listeners. The program, 
no doubt, proved to be the best of 
the season. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1931 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

1 weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL • STAFP 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31 ... .Associate Editor 
R. Morgan, '31 Managing Editor 

REP OUT OKI AL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31. 
Ruth Shroyer, '32 
Hilda Buckley, 32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33.Gen'l Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delpiuan 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 Business Manager 

P. Keene, '32.. Asst. Business Manager 
C. Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, Jiingiish Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, Engiisn .Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter unuer tne 
Act of March 3, lS7a. 



ETIQUETTE OR—. 



Let's take it all for granted and be 
done with it. But hypocrisy or no 
hypocrisy, such actions and attitudes 
which arise Aroim, improperly eval-> 
uating the place of politeness and 
chivalry in modern society must in- 
evitably lead to the nulllification of 
the benefits of oo-education. Some 
of our present agitators might do 
well to back-down a peg or two and 
think it over, regardless of the fac- 
tion to which they belong. 



COMPETITION 



If smoke may be considered a 
sign of the presence of fire (and it, 
usually may be) here is being xanneu 
into flame the embers of a quarrei 
that may well spell disaster lor tne 
social activities of our campus, we 
refer to the feud between tne male 
and female sections of the studeni 
body. 

Perhaps "fued" is a strong word, 
we use it largely by way 01 predic- 
tion. For unless somening is done 
to curb present tendencies, an ac- 
tual feud is invitabie. We believe 
such an outcome would be deplored 
by all, partcularly those who are re- 
sponsible in large measure lor the 
present agitation. Hence we beg 
leave to suggest that the nursing oi 
grudges cease and that a more 
wholesome , ( and liberal attitude be 
assumed at once by each faction to- 
ward the other. 

We will not presume to attempt 
to fix the blame for the present ir- 
ritation. We are firmly convinced 
that both groups are sulpable. No 
true geutleman expects the object of 
his polite attentions to bow the knee 
and worship or smother him with 
profuse expressions of gratitude by 
way of reward. The esential chival- 
ry of a man spurns such petty non- 
sense. On the other hand, the true 
lady willl inevitably manifest a dig- 
nified gratitude. She will not as- 
sume the distant coldness of a queen, 
or he jeering behavior of the cynic. 

The very fact that a controversy 
of the present proportions has arisen 
points out a fault that has existed 
on both sides of the campus for quite 
some time. Caught, as we are, in 
the rush of activities incident to mod- 
ern college life, we have relegated 
to the "scrap head" or, at best, the 
list of necessary evils, the details of 
polite conduct that foster a proper 
understanding and preserve the ben- 
efits of conversation between the 
sexes. We have felt that the proper 
slogan for both men and women is: 
"Etiquette, be hanged. Let's be hard- 
boiled." And so the men cease to 
be politely attentive, and the women 
ignore or jeer at those who retain 
the stamp of the old order. 

Of course, the matter is one which 
calls for the finest adjustment and 
the greatest discretion. Let us be 
sincere, by all means. If we are at 
heart a bunch of selfish, hard-boiled, 
caveman-type brutes, lets not be hy- 
pocritical about it; lets be natural. 
And if the ladies are actually bored 
to death by any necessity for mani- 
festing gratitude, why lie about it? 



The announcement of a series of 
uniform aptitude tests to be submit- 
ted to all preTmedical students, 
throughtout the United States, issued 
by the American Medical Association 
brings forcibly to our attention the 
change in the attitude of our schools 
toward the acquisition of students. 
Time was when institutions bargain- 
ed for a larger enrollment by offer- 
ing all kinds of inducements. Now 
we are turning away thousands of 
would-be students every year. 

The tide has turned, and the pros- 
pective student must take into full 
account this change. If he would 
continue his studies in a higher in- 
stitution, he must get busy, ior 
everywhere the standards are being 
raised and competition is becoming- 
keener. He is no longer in such de- 
mand that his refusal to enter this 
institution or that can cause the reg- 
istrar to lose some sleep. If he 
has done something to show that he 
is in someway above the average, he 
can command a bit of attention. 
Otherwise he is simply lost in the 
rush. 

And so it is after lie has taken 
his degree. Time was when he was 
looked upon as quite a celebrity, a 
agure of note, in his home town at 
least. The mass-production of diplo- 
mas however, has completely altered 
the situation. He is now in competi- 
tion with thousands of others who 
can match his attainments degree 
for degree, semester hour for semes- 
ter hour, and unless he has done 
something which makes him stand 
out from the rest, he is lost in the 
rush. 

What the medical profession is do- 
ing other professions are bound to 
imitate eventually; some, indeed, 
have already begun the work. Oc- 
cupations which were at one time 
"onsidered immune from the attacks 
of unemployment are fast becoming 
overcrowded. The demand is for the 
best; the mediocre are thrown into 
f he discard. Push is rapedly sup- 
planting pull as the great job-getter. 

What is Lebanon Valley's answer 
remarkedly successful in turning out 
men and women who have won dis- 
tinction in their fields. Will we con- 
tinue to do so in the face of the 
elevated standards, the ever-keener 1 
completition of the present and the 
future ? 



votions were conductea uy otewaru 
Warner, who r,ead seieciums C.10111. 
Romans tor his Scrip aire lessen. 

ine first number on tne prog;xum 
was a tatK by Paul Evancoe, en u Lieu 
"ine Meaning of a Eioerai Educa- 
tion." The philosophy enDodied in tne 
j/aikj was very good, rtarry ZitcK 
then spoke extensively m ine suoject 
"Chickens," and in the very beam- 
ing of his talk he made it plain tnau 
his chicKens were of the leatnereu 
variety. He traced the chicken iiom 
the egg to the consumer, and gave 
some light on the economics of -jiiick- 
en farming. 

"Selections from Elbert Hubbard's 
Scrapbook", was the feature present- 
ed by Charles Kraybiii. His cnoice 
of readings was one which had an, 
especial appeal to college students. 
The next number was a "pep" talk 
by Woodrow Dellinger entitled, "Lets 
Kill Kalo". He urged backing of the 
team, and "pepped up" the fellows 
in general. 

Robert Rawhouser of York Coun- 
ty then spoke on "Wickershambles," 
giving the origin and meaning of that 
term. However, the last but by no: 
means least number was "Living 
Thoughts" by John David Hughes. 
Righly styled the Bums of Catawissa 
he presented several oroginal poems 
to the society. He not only showed 
his mastery of rhyme, rhythm and 
words, but also showed such extra- 
ordinary sense of humor that the 
audience was from beginning to end 
in paroxysms of laughter. Fred W. 
Mund, acting as critic, then criticized 
the program. Under general remarks 
fun ran high when jokes,, puns and 
suggestions flew fast and furiously 
from^one portion of the room to the 
other. 

At a business meeting the follow- 
ing were elected to office: Francis 
Barr, president; Paul Keene. Vice- 
president; Fred W. Mund, Chairman 
of the Executive Com; Stewart 
Werner, Recording Secretary; Joe 
Rhen, Pianist; Charles Wise, Critic; 
Fred Christman, Judge; Chester 
Goodman, Chaplain; Woodrow Del- 
linger, Editor; and Dwight Gove, 
Earl Howard, and Michel Jordan, 
sergeants at Arms. 



in the thriling victory. She tallied 
20 of the points — her eye was per- 
fect. She didn't miss very manny 
shots, thus breaking the notable L. 
V. C. characteristic. 



Ruth Armacost playeda brilliant 
passing game at side-center. She is 
the fastest floor worker on the squad 
and uses a hook pas with much ac- 
curacy. 



Thursday night the varsity enter- 
tained the St. John's quintette from 
Annopolis and encountered much bet- 
ter opposition than had been expect- 
ed. 8he game was a victory for our 
Blue and White tossers by a mar- 
gin of one field goal, the final score 
was 36-34. 



Stewart payed his usual brilliant 
floor game while Heller led the 
scorers with 19 points. Ca tallied 
nine free tosses and three field goals. 
He completely outclassed the oppos- 
ing center — or should I say centers 
— three men were used to check Cal 
but they found their efforts worth 
very little. 



where "naught but peace ever reig. 
neth." Let his memory not be inar- 
red by the taunting remarks that are 
Hung from the windows of the girl s ' 
dorm. 

And so, when he departs for other 
realms, lelt him remember that -w e 
wish for him, in his new home, big. 
ger, more lasting and more beautiful 
college friendships." 
Signed, 
A Hero Worshipper. 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



COURTESY, PLEASE, 



Out of courtesy to the administra- 
tion which has expended considerable 
time and gone to considerable ex- 
pense to enlarge the parking facili- 
ties at the rear of the Administra- 
tion building, we would like to sug- 
gest that greater care be exercised 
by those who make use of this con- 
venience. Several people have shown 
n tendency to overrun the limits of 
the gravel, thereby damaging the 
lawn and giving to the campus a, 
most unsightly appearance. The dan- 
ger is greatest on warm days and 
will be at its height in spring. Let's 
start now to cultivate the habit of 
keeping strictly on the gravel and 
avoiding the lawn. 



PHI LMBDA SIGMA 



The Philo Literary meeting was 
called to order by the President, 
Charles Wise, on Friday 6, 1931. De 



L. V. C. witnessed a brilliant pass- 
ing attack common to western quin- 
tettes at the hands of the Annapolis 
lads. On o bigger floor the outcome 
of the game may have been differ- 
ent. We leack the team work and 
passing attack but we do have the 
"eye." 



Familiar sights on the campus 

Freshmen and students Blondes 

brunettes and ? ? ? ? they haven't 

decided as yet Oley and Pat with 

a chew of Mail Pouch Lechtaler 

waiting For whom? R e( j 

Wogan practicing his Alpine Yodel- 

ing Bob Stewart putting on his 

tie dashing to college Charley 

iviummert going down to eat....Denny 

yawning Joe Wood practicing 

his German on his brother who isn't 

interested Naomi Shively smiling 

tiggie Shaeffer relaxing 

Moose Morgan quoting the chemis-i 

cry book Sweeny Light skiing 

to class (pardon me) Goe. Nye's 

voice trying to arouse: Bull Early 
and Jim Monteith J)ottie Thomp- 
son looking the day students over .... 
lUumbiegel and I on the scent of 
something to put in this column. 



The co-eds ran into a tough match 
with Ursinus and lost the game by a 
margin of nine points 33-24. The 
spectators were bawled out by a di- 
minuitive referee for improper con- 
duct. Oh deah! Don't forget your 
"Athletic Etiquette" boys, Emily 
Post hasn't published that volume 
yet but when she does we'll order a 
set for our cheering section. 



At a business meeting of Clionian 
Literary Society, Friday evening, 
February 6, plans were made for the 
next meeting which will be in the 
form of a Valentine Party. 

Following the business meeting, a 
literary program celebrating the 
birthday of Abraham Lincoln was 
presented. After a brief resume of 
the boyhood of the "Emancipator" 
by Ann Matula, his politicall career 
was traced by Ethel Mae Hower. 
Martha Kreider told of Lincoln's 
great love affair in a book review of 

The Soul of Ann Rutledge". His- 
marriage to Mary Todd, and various 
enteresting events of their married 
life, were related by Miriam Silvius. 
As a conclusion to the program, a trip 
composed of Eulalie Morton, Mildred 
Nye, and Dorothy Garber sang sev- 
eral Southern melodies closing with 
the well-known negro spiritual 
"Swing Low, Sweet Chariot." 



This week-end the boys have two 
strong opponents on their slate while 
the girls have one. We pllay F. & M. 
at Lancaster Friday night and tangle 
with Susquehanna here Sat. The girls 
play Western Maryland here Sat. 
afternoon. Don't forget to support 
the teams. We raise the dead if we 
don't have games — let's attend the 
few we do have. 



Sport Shots 



Last weekend was a very lively one 
in the way of home games. We did 
not do so bad either. The boys won 
their game while the girls broke 
even. 



In the fistt tilt the co-eds trimmed 
Juniata by a margin of one point. 
The finla score was 26-25. It surely 
was a thriller — a good means of re- 
ducing. 



Albright beat F. & M. by a mar- 
gin of 8 points last week. Looks 
as though the game Friday night 
will be a thriller. Let's all go over 
to Lancaster if possible — it'll be 
worth the trip. 



Dickinson beat Mt. St. Mary's 
30-29 Sat. at Emmitsburg. Sounds as 
though the Mountaineers have im- 
proved quite a bit since their last 
tilt. We play them here next Tues- 
day. Another chance for "Athletic 
Etiquette." 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



'Kit" Yingst was the main factor 



Dear Editor: 

How could you be so cruel as to 
fail to disclose the name of that 
young Diogenes, that inspiring phil 
osopher, so mysteriously signed D. 
P. How could you keep his identity 
a secret and rob us of the joy of 
prostrating ourselves before him on 
this humble campus. 

Oh, that such a brilliant mind and 
many others too, I suppose must suf 
fer these "boring surroundings." Can 
it be that he is to spend some more 
years among this collection of 
"worthless, insignificant women" who 
persist in divulging the secrets of 
our campus martyrs, the men? 

We know that if he should, at last 
by desperation, be forced to seek 
another institution of learning he 
will never forget the men's dormitory 



There was a big debate the other 
night in our room as to the attitude 
of the Freshman ever since the "gold- 
en" rule has been in effect. My per- 
sonal opinion is that we purchase a 
few feet of the campus from the 
Frosh so we might have a little space 
for upper class activities. You can't 
rule Frosh by legislation. The way 
to a Freshman's heart is not through 
his stomach. Leo Kelly suggests that 
the old fashioned game of "Stoop- 
and-take-it" is the only fit remedy. I 
am inclined to believe as he does, if 
not carried to excess. 



I promised George Nye that I 
would help him out in editing the 
year book. He needs help and what- 
ever I can do I am more than will- 
ing to help. It seems as though there 
is an epidemic of vanity or camera- 
shyness around our campus. Bro. Nye 
says that some of you folks are a 
little lax in having your picture 
"took". It is a big help to George 
and the staff if you do get your pic- 
ture in on time and besides it is an 
advantage to you as a discount is 
taken off if th e photo's are in before 
the dead line. So rally around and 
get shot! 



The Freshman hop was a "howl- 
ing" success! In fact, I howled so 
much that some wise-chacker sug- 
gested I would be useful to any 
steam ship in a fog! 



Understand the "No smoking" rule 
has gone into effect! Remember S ir ^ s 
I'd walk a mile for a "hump". 



A young and ambitious author has 
sprung up in our midst. Roy Lech- 
thaler has compiled material on an 
interesting subject, '*How to sleep 
three in a bed!" All rights reserved 
including translation into Scandina 
vian. 



Ye editor was just here and sug- 
gested I get through with this tras^ 
I thing I was through about thr 
weeks ago! 



A rt 

Ernest Dimnet, author of " The 
of Thinking" , says "Americans c 
not realize how many chances , 



mental improvement they 11 



by 



their inveterate habit of keepUW 
six conversations while there 
twelve in the room. 



■ 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1931 



PAGE THREE 




"I hope your children are acro- 
bats," snarled the villian to the hero. 

And lo and behold, several months 
later the doctor announced to our 
jjero that he was the father of a 
bouncing baby boy. 



James — There's a woman peddler 
at the door, sir. 

Jiggs — Show him in, and tell him 
to bring his samples with him. 



They called him Daniel because he 
was such a Boone to his family. 



"I've got some loving to do," sighed 
Solomon as he made out the days 
schedule. 



jKrummy — Lend me five for a 
week, old dear. 
Bill — Where's the weak old dear? 



The dance was over and he had 
taken her home. Now they sat on 
the davenport watching the embers 
glow red in the fire-place. She nestled 
in his arms. Not a move, not even 
a word. They loved each other; they 
were at peace with the world. She 
stirred. 

"Comfy, dear?" he murmured. 
"Urn — m — m — m 

Silence — They watched the fire. 
She moved slightly. 
"Aren't you comfy, darling ?" he 
inquired solicitously. 
"Urn — m, yes. 

Silence, they watched the lire. 

She shuddered. 

"Cold, sweetest." 

"U,m — m — m, no 

Silence, they watched the fire. 

She wiggled. 

"What's the matter, dearest?" 

"Um — m — m, nothing." 

Silence, they watched the fire. 

She squirmed, she jumped to her 
feet, she shook herself violently. 
"Darn the person who put that con- 
fette down my back." 



Taylor — I had another nightmare 
last night. How can I cure myself 
of them? 

Keene — That's easy — take eight 
grams of mercury bichloride every 
night just before you go to bed. 



"What's the idea of two hoods over 
your car?" 

"Well, the first one is just a false- 
hood." ( 



Ruth — What are you thinking a- 
bout? 

Gladys — Thanks for the compli- 
ment. 



Tourist (in park looking at a pe- 
culiarly shaped boulder). And, just 
where did you say this rock came 
from ? 

Guide — A glacier brought it down. 
Tourist — (looking around) — And 
where did the glacier go ? 
Guide — Back after another rock! 



Evancoe — My fair one, you reign 
supreme in my heart. Without you all 
would be dark and dreary. When the 
clouds gather and the snow and hail 
beat upon me, then I think of you. 
Then comes the warm Southern 
winds — the storms break and through 
the dying showers I see your love 
shining bright and clear. Fy rain- 
bow! 

Billie — Hey, is this a weather re- 
port or a proposal? 



Optomist — After all, old boy, we've 
Sot to admit it; the most beautiful 
thing in the world is woman. 

Cynic — Yes, when she has money. 



Guest (on phone) Say. ain't I 
paying for two people in this room? 

Roam Clerk — Yes, sir, its listed 
under double rates. 

Guest — Then how come there's just 
°ne Bible? 



Our comception of the height of 
competition — a traveling salesman 
an d a sailor rushing the same girl. 



'Mother there's a blind man at 
tfl e door." 

'Tell h ; im that we don't want any." 
(Better read this again). 



Now that Peggy Joyce is going to 
Promise to love, honor, land away 
, 0r the fifth time, she ought to know 
four out of every five have it. 



Anne — Don't leave me, darling. 
Rudy — I must. Progress pleads for 
Science asks it. The governor de- 
mands it. 



s Peg— Yep, I've read all this guy 1 

Eton's poetry, unless he's written 
S0Ttl e lately. 

Clem— Whv, Milton is immortal. 

Speg— I didn't see anything bad 
n his works. 




The annual River Styx Bathing 
Beauty Contest was over. An animat- 
ed buzz of conversation, in which a 
arose from the west veranda of the 
Styx Golf and Country Club, where 
a score of ladies famous for their 
beauty had gathered after their hu- 
miliating defeat. An unknown from 
Indiana had been declared the win- 
ner and given the name, "Miss Styx" 

"Well," said Helen of Troy, "it 
looks crooked to me. The little snip!" 

"I'll swear I saw her wink at the 
judges," snapped Suzanna, she of the 
public bath, and famed in all art 
galleries.| "And one of my Elders 
smirked back at me! But I'll fix him, 
you bet!" 

"I'll never speak to Mark Antony 
again!" sobbed Cleopatra, slapping 
her pet asp peevishly. "He promised 
that he would use his influence on 
one of the judges who owes him mon- 
ey." 

"You can't depend on these men," 
put in Pocahontas. "Just wait till I 
see that captain John Smith!" 

"And Henry vowed he'd fix it for 
us !" wailed the wives of Henry 
VIII in unison. 

"Oh bother your men!" snapped 
Salome viciously. It was that little 
Indiana sneak's fault. Oh, why didn't 
I wear my one-piece bathing suit, 
sounds of angry weeping settled over 
the porch as one and all were sub- 
too! I'd like to snatch her head off!' 

A silence broken only by the 
merged in gloom. No one even looked 
up when several more defeated con- 
testants, the Sorens, the Torelei, and 
the Amazons, who had entered the 
competition as dark horses, entered 
the groups. Only Queen Elizabeth 
went placidly on with her knitting. 
She hadn't reallly expected to win 
anyway. 



The only dog who could recognize 
his master's voice today on a phon- 
ograph would be a jazz hound. 



PRINTING— 

Stationery, Announcements. 
Publications, Catalogues, 
Booklets, Etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO' 

Annville .... Penna. 



THIS IS A QUALITY SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

Service, Workmanship and Materials 
Hand Stitching 

W. D. ELLIOTT, JR. 

140 N. Railroad St., 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



Y. W. NOTES 



In commemoration of the approach- 
ing anniversary of Abraham Lin- 
coln's birth, Feb. 12, the Y. W. pre- 
sented on Sunday evening, a pro- 
gram which centered upon the life 
and character of this great national 
figure. 

A very helpful devotional program 
was conducted by Sarah Ensminger, 
the leader for the evening; this con- 
sisted of the scripture lesson, prayer 
and the singing of several hymns. 
"Homely Objects Concerning Lin- 
coln", a magazine article filled with 
quaint mirth and humor, was then 
reviewed by Ruth Shroyer. A paper 
on '''The Gentleness and Religious 
aspects of Lincoln" was prepared 
and read by Elizabeth Ulrich. A ser- 
ies of brief sayings concerning this 
great war hero were also contributed 
by Edith Fields. 

The program as a whole, was in- 
teresting and iinispirin'-i. and help r 
ful to renew our adm'ralkn for this 
martyr President, whose memorv 
held dear in he hearts of eve' y loyal 
American. 




The United States has dropped the 
court-martial of Major General 
Smedley D. Butler. General Sutler 
has been restored to his command 
at Quantico with a reprimand by Sec- 
retary Adams, of the Navy. The rep- 
rimand was sharp but at the same 
time paid tribute to the marine lead- 
er's record of brilliant service. 



The rain and snow over the week- 
end brought drought relief to par- 
ched farmlands in several states. The 
rain fell in a belt extending from 
western Pennsylvania southwestward 
to eastern Texas. 



Prince ' Lennart of Sweden has re- 
nounced his title and rights to suc- 
cession to the throne of Sweden in 
order that he may marry for love, 
all this despite the opposition of his 
grandfather, King Gustave. The 
marriage is to take place sometime 
next year. His future bride is the 
daughter of a wealthy business man 
of Sweden. 



Two of President Hoover's bitter- 
est foes a week ago have now sur- 
rendered to him in their fight for 
a food dole which the President h a s 
been fighting against. The $20,000, 
000 is to be loaned and not a gift to 
destitute drought stricken farmers. 
It is to be used for food, clothing 
medical supplies and expenditures 
relative to raising crops. 



FOR THE STUDENT'S BOOK 
SHELF 

• INEXPENSIVE EDITIONS 
OF ALL THE BEST 
IN 

Fiction, Poetry, Drama, Classics, 
Essays, History, Belles Letters, Ref- 
erences Philosophy, Theology, Travel, 
'Topography, and Etc. 

GET THEM IN 

The Modern Library 95 

The Star Books L00 

Everyman's Library 90 

The Sun Dial Library 1.00 

And Man Others 

BOLLMANS 

BOOKSELLER & STATIONER 
33 South Eighth Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Flying a new airplane for two and 
one half hours without touching the 
j leering gear was the feat accom- 
plished by Pilot Wiehler of the Fock- 
Wulff works, of Bremen, when he re- 
cently delivered a machine of the 
Buzzard type, at Fuerth, Bavaria. 
As soon as he reached the desired 
altlitude, he sat the wheel according 
to his compass in a straight line 
for Fuerth. 




Under the direction of Miss Mary 
K. Wallace, their instructor, the stu- 
dents in English Compositions have 
written a number of essays in imita- 
tion of the style of Francis Bacon. 
Through the courtesy of Miss Wal- 
lace we are publishing some of the 
most excellent productions. 



OF LOQUACITY 



It was an old maxim credited to 
Confucius that, "It would be well to 
mi. ate the men of old, who spoke 
-ttle, for those who talked much, are 
:ure to say something it would be 
;>ette r to have left unsaid." There- 
fore, let us in this matter exercise 
self restraint, which is the greatest 
cf all virtues and the hardest to at- 
tain. For as Buddha saith, "Though 
a man conquer a thousand thousand 
men in battle, a greater conquerer 
still is he who conquers himself." 
However, no man should attempt tc 
cease all intercourse with his fellows 
For though talk without thought is 
foolishness, thought without talk is 
selfishness. 

The greatest harm of loquacious- 
ness is that it always injueth some- 
one. First, it hath the effect of in- 
juring the person who speaketh. For 
one who talks much is liked little 
Second, it boreth the listener exceed- 
ingly and trieth his patience to the 
utmost. 

There are four types of those who 
are loquacious: First: The fool who 
talkefh much merely because he de 
sireth to hear his own voice. Second- 
The educated fool who hath expend- 
ed much time and labor amassing r 
knowledge of facts and events which 
he insists on repeatine to his hear- 
ers. Third: The wit who attempteth 
to coin humorous remarks and wittv 
puns. Fourth: The gossip or sland- 
erer, who spendeth his time spread- 
ing false and malicious rumors about 
persons of otherwise good repute. 



And of these four, the first two types 
are entirely harmless, and hurt no 
one except themselves. The third 
type hurteth us only temporarily, and 
then merely by the decreasing of our 
self-esteem. However, the Fourth 
type is malevolent, venomous and in- 
vidious. He hurteth all and benefit- 
eth none. He destroyeth the good 
repute of honorable gentlemen and 
aids none saving thieves and rascals. 
This is the only type of loquacious- 
ness which doeth real harm, and must 
therefore be sharply watched, so 
closely that Cerebus of the three 
heads might be the guard. Therefore, 
control and restrain your tongue, for 
as Dhammapade hath wisely said 
"Good is restraint in all things." 



L. V. C. CLIPT ST. 

JOHN'S WINGS 



( Continued from Page 1) 



and ran up a nine-point lead. The 
score at the end of the first half was 
21-12. 

Alter the rest per*od St. John's 
attack worked to perfection and they 
soon closed the gap that seperated 
the two teams. At one time they held 
the lead but Lebanon Valley rose to 
the situation and pulled the game out 
of the fire. 

St. John's showed a neat passing 
game that kept our men busy trying 
co break it up. McCartie and Fader 
*vere cneir scoring stars with twelve 
and eight points respectively. 
Lebanon Valley 



juine Up 




G 


F 


P 


ciewart F. 




7 





14 


Morrison F. 







1 


1 


Reeder F. 













ii Light F. 













Williams F. 













nelier C. 




3 


9 


15 


Orsino G. 




1 





2 


M. Light G. 




1 





2 


Frey G. 










o 


S. Light . 




1 





2 


Total ' 


St. John's 


13 


10 


36 


Line Up 




G 


F 


P 


McCtrie F. 




5 


2 


12 


Lroty F. 













Wolanske F. 


C. 


2 


1 


5 


Hoff F. 




2 


2 


6 


Zeigler C. 













Fader G. 




4 





8 


Carpenter G. 




1 


1 


3 


Total 




14 


6 


34 



Refree — Boyer. 



TOURIST BELL PHONE 

ACCOMMODATIONS ANNVILLE 69-R-13 

YE COZY INN, H. C. COFFROATH, Prop. 
Wm. Penn Highway, 4 Miles West of Lebanon, Pa. 
We Cater To Private Parties and Banquets 
Special Dinners and A La Carte Service 
Ample Parking Space We Serve With a Smile 




KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHE R 

COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 

FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, Pa. 



SHEET MUSIC MUSICAL BOOKS 

MUSICAL GOODS VICTOR RECORDS 

VICTOR RADIOS 

Miller's Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1931 



FAIR TOSSERS 

WIN AND LOSE 



(Continued from Page 1) 



lorwards on both teams "sinking" 
shot after shot while each score 
steadily rose. The Lebanon Valley- 
ites showed a decided superiority 
over the Huntingdon lassies in the 
first few minutes of the game, shown 
by the score at the end of the first 
quarter, 10 to 4 in favor of the Ann- 
ville stars. 

In the second quarter the Juniata 
team did some especially fine play- 
ing. Their passing was exceptionally 
well done, aiding them to swell their 
score 8 points, making their score 
12 while Lebanon Valley succeeded 
only in raising their score to 15 
points In the second half of the game 
it was a close battle. Each team was 
deteljmined to win. Yingst's well-i 
aimed shots at forward for Lebanon 
Valley and Hower's- for Juniata ser- 
ved to make the fray intensely ex- 
citing. The last few minutes of the 
game were filled with rather care- 
less playing which may be attributed 
to the ober eargerness of the play- 
ers. At the final blow of the whistle 
the score stood 27-25, in favoror of 
Lebanon Valley. 

Lebanon Valley 

Line Up G F P 

Yingst R. F. 2 2 6 

Hershey L. F. 3 6 

Mille r L. F. 4 19 

Gossard C. 

Engle C. 

Forry C. 

Armacost S. C. 

Weirick R. G. 

Rupp L. G. 

Br a nt L. C. 

21 

Ursinus 

Line Up G F P 

Connor R. F. 3 6 

Keb R. F. 10 2 

Strickler L. F. 10 2 22 

Grim L. F. 11 

Wismer C. 

Swartz S. C. 

Wheatty S. C. 

Urick R. G. 

Pfaler R. G. 

Heinly L. G. 

31 

Dugan— Umpire, Graff— Refree 

Lebanon Valley 

Line Up G F P 

Yingst R. F. 9 1 19 

Hershey L. F. 3 2 8 

Gossard C. 

Engle C. 

Armacost Si C. 

Weirick R. G. 

Rupp L. G. 

Brant L. G. 

27 

Juniata 



GLEEMEN OPEN 

1931 SEASON 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Line Up 


G 


F 


P 


Repeagle R. F. 


1 


2 


5 


F a ust L. F. 


9 


2 


20 


Hower L. F. 











Smith C. 











Sell S. C. 











Hower R. G. 











DeTurk R. G. 











Replagle L. G. 

















25 



Bill Forgan, a muscle-bound business 

man _.. Clyde Mentzer 

Mrs. Jeanette Morgan, his wife 

Allan Ranck 

Edwards, a noted traveler R. Hughes 

A servant George Derickson 

Scene: A small room at a sea-side 
resort. 

Time: The present. 

Saxaphone Solo.... Valse Marlyn .... 

Walldoeft 

Esterellita Ponce 

Mr. Snowhill 
Tenor Solo .... I see you at Dawning 

Kountz 

A Brown Bird Singing ..Hyden Wood 

The Nest Olds 

The Sleigh Kountz 

Listen To The Lambs ^ 

Glee Club 

The Club also held concert on 
Thursday night in Lebanon. 

We hope that the club will have a 
most successful season. 



written in French and signed by M. 
Dieu, a customs inspector, who said 
he found it while walking along the 
seashore at Ganville. 



Tossed around on the high seas, 
for nearly four years, a note which 
had been thrown overboard in a bot- 
tle, was returned to its author, Jo- 
seph Horvath. Enroute to his na- 
tive country, Hungary, in 1927, he 
tossed the bottle overboard after 
leaving New York Harbor. Never 
expecting to hear from it again. The 
note read: Bethlehem, Pa., U. S. A. 
A few days ago he received a letter 



A -2 SKIL* 
WORKS WONDE&S 




Rioting by Republican students 
flared up in Spain again, adding un- 
easiness to a political situation mud- 
died by tne refusal of all parties ex- 
cept tne extreme right monarchists 
to participate m the March nrsc par 
liamentary election. Every univer- 
sity in Spain was closed a few days 
ago by a general student strike pre- 
viously arranged. The resulting ten- 
sion caused demonstrations ui 
cities of Huelva and Santiago de 
Compostella. Students paraded the 
streets shouting for a republic and 
demanding the immediate release of 
students and professors imprisoned 
for participating in, the republican 
outbreak last month. 



^MEDICAL STUDENTS 

ARE GIVEN TESTS 



According to an announcement by 
Dr. Derickson, a series of medical 
aptitude tests, prepared by the A- 
merican Medical Association, will be 
given to all students in pre-medical 
schools throughout the United States 
who intend to apply for entrance to 



H. GOODMAN SONS 

29 W. Sheridan Ave. 

Real Refreshments in a 
Real Way 
Ice Cream, Cakes and Pies 



ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 

207 W. Main 



Grimm's Book Store 

Try us for your needs 
RINGS 

SOCIETY PINS set with 
Pearls 

SHAEFFER FOUNTAIN 

PENS AND PENCILS 
DESK SETS 
BOOK ENDS 

DIE STAMPED STATION- 
ERY with College or Soc- 
iety Seals 



LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 

Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



GET YOUR VALENTINE BON ONS NOW 

The Pennway 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



Referee — Graeff. 



NEW LINE OF FROCKS 
AND GOWNS 

Rose Singer ShoD 

761 Cumberlad Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



a medical school at 3:00 o'clock, Fri- 
day. The tests will be given to all 
students at the same hcur and, as 
nearly as possible, under the same 
conditions in 700 colleges 

It is understood that these tests 
are largely for the purpose of de- 
termining fitness for medical work, 
and are not primarily based upon 
knowledge acquired. The purpose is 
doubtless to eliminate the large per- 
centage of students who fail at the 
end of the first semester of their 
medical school experience, and to ad- 
mit in their stead others who are 
more fit for medical service but who 
are now being turned away because 
of inadequate facilities. Just how far 
the results of these examinations 
will determine who shall be admitt- 
ed is unknown at the present. It is be- 
lieved, however, that they will come 
to play a very important part in the 
future. 



i COLLEGE CALENDAR i 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville ... p a 



MENS 

Horse Hide Leather Coats, Shoes 
Underwear, Sweaters Srirts and 
Ties. 

LADIES 
Silk Undies, Slk Hose, Stap Sand- 
als, Pumps, Gloves. 
COURTESY — SERVICE 

J.F.BERLEW 

9-11 West Main Street. 
Annville, Pa. 



D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



j Friday, Feb. 13th— Girls basket | 

ball game at Cedar Crest. S 

iBoys game at Franklin ! 

and Marshall. j 

| Saturday, Feb. 14th— Boys bas- I 

ket ball game with Sus- I 

quehanna in High School j 

j Gym. Girls game at 1:00 j 

with Western Maryland. j 

jj Sunday. Feb. 15th — Friendly- j 

i Hour in North Hall Paror i 



at 5:45. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESSING 
KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORMS 

10 W. Main St. Annville, P a . 



Sandwiches Sodas 

EAT AT ROEMIG'S 

ICE CREAM 
Cigars Cigarettes 
DELICIOUS HOME MADE 



Chef's 

House of Good 
Foods 

Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 




Meals Served at All Hours 
Our Specially 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 



For Quality 

BAKED PRODUCTS 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



CLOTHING F QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

T T A TjprT ' CJ "^k* Gift Store of Lebanon 

rilXtKrCjLi ^ 757-759 Cumberland Streot 

Special Rate on Portraits to Students 



p 



QUITTIE PHOTO 
DEAD LINES 
SATURDAY. FEB. 21. 



VOLUME VII 



latieCoII^ieitnt 

L EBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1931 



ALL OUT 
FOR DELPHIAN 
ANNIVERSARY 



No. 13 



LOCALS OUTPLAY 
MT. ST. MARY'S 

HELLER AND STEWART 
ARE LEADING 
SCORERS 



Lebanon Valley scored another 
victory when Mt. St. Mary's was de- 
feated 42-30 on Tuesday night. The 
game was played in the Annville 
High School gymnasium. 

The play was slightly rough and 
did not produce brilliant basketball. 
The local team hurried their attack 
which resulted in throwing the ball 
out of bounds very often. In addi- 
tion quite a few shots were missed 
from under the basket. 

Lebanon Valley led throughout 
the whole time although the lead was 
very slim at times. At the end of 
the first period the Blue and White 
was leading 22-16. 

Again Heller and Stewart were the 
leading point gatherers, each with 
six field goals and one foul. Orsino 
played a good game and sank some 
pretty long shots:. 

Chalkley ond Lynch lead Mt. St. 
Mary's: with eleven and ten points 
respectively. The former proved to 
be a long shot expert, putting in 
two goals from near the center of 
the floor. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



GLEE CLUB GIVES 

CONCERT IN LEBANON 



The Men's Glee Club held its sec- 
ond concert of the season in Lebanon 
last Thursday evening at 8:15. The 
program, printed in last weeks issue 
of this paperj, v\ns followed. The 
people who attended the concert said 
it was one of the best they had ever 
heard, and seemed well pleased with 
it. 

TWe Club is continuing its weekly 
practice preparing for concerts which 
have been arranged and which are 
being arranged. The club promises 
to have a good season and the sched- 
ule of concerts arranged will appear 
ln this paper at some future date. 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 1 



CHEMISTS MEET IN 

INTERESTING SESSION 



The Chemistry Club held its regu- 
lar meeting last Thursday evening, 
After a few preliminary remarks 
and the reading f the minutes, the 
program of the evening was opened 
by Mr. Spangler. He gave a talk 
on the chemistry of photography 
which proved to be quite novel. The 
talk was supplemented by a chart 
illustrating the steps in the manufac- 
ture of a photographic film together 
with an actual demonstration of the 
path of a film through the develop- 
ing process to the finished negative. 
He then made a print from the neg- 
ative and demonstated its prepara- 
tion. 

Mr. Bank, the second speaker of 
ihe vening, reported on the much con- 
tested phase of bii-chemistry, syn- 
thetic life. His discourse of the 
matter revealed new food for thought 
and settled at least one idea, viz- 
that some things are not what they 
seem to be. Mr. Miller followed 
with a talk on the Modern Alchemy 
in Iron and Steel, the gist of his 
subject being he producion of new 
durable and stronger alloys of metals, 
\the synthesis of which is rivaling the 
old alchemy. 

Mr. Conrad concluded the program 
with a paper on some chemical as- 
pects of the production of Petroleum. 
He also made use of a chart in the 
explanation of his talk. At the con- 
clusion of the program, a trip to 
the Hershey Chocolate Factory was 
discussed and received favorable 
comment. Having no further bus- 
iness, the meeting adjourned. 



Thursday, Feb. 19— Boys and 
Girls Basket-Bali game 
with Albright College at 
I Reading. 
(Friday, Feb. 20— Regular Lit- 
erary Meeting of Kalo, 
Philo and Clio. 
Saturday Feb 21— Delphian 
Anniversary Presentation 
of "The Romantic Age" in 
the Engle Conservatiry at 
B:00 P. M.. Basket-Ball 
gone at Allentown with 
Muhfenberg College. 
Sunday, Feb, 22— Friendly Hour 
Nirth Hall Parlor 5:45 P. 
M. 

Monday, Feb. 23— Basket-Ball 
game with P. M. . at Phil- 
adelphia. 
Wednesday, Feb. 25— Basket- 
Bail game with Franklin: 
& Marshall College in the 
High School gymnasium 
f at 8:00 P. F. 



GIRLS HOLD DOWN 
FAST M'LAND TEAM 

OPPONENTS EXHIBIT 
SPEEDY FLOOR 
WORK 



Lady Luck was again far distant 
from the girls basketball team of 
Lebanon Valley when they went down 
in defeat by three points to the 
jBwift-moving sextette of Western 
Maryland College, Saturday after- 
noon in the Annville High School 
gymnasium. 

The game was particularly slow in 
the first half of the fracas. How- 
ever, in the second half, the Lebanon 
Valleyelites forged ahead overcoming 
a lead of seven points which was a- 
feainst them at the half, to the score 
in the last few minutes of the game 
But the fouling of the home team 
won the game for the visitors, they 
making three foul shots almost at 
the end of the gamb giving them a 
three point preference over Lebanon 
Valley. 

Lebanon Valley was forded to play 
a defensive game from beginning to 
end thus putting Armacost to a dis- 
advantage as he main point is her 
offensive work. The guards w'ere a 
little "off" aolor for the blue and 
white but they did have particul- 
arly good forwards to oppose. Mur- 
( Continued on Page 4) 



SHROYER WILL 
EDIT LA VIE 



RAWHOUSER TO 
AS BUSINESS 
MANAGER 



ACT 



By action of the Faculty, Miss Ruth 
iShroyer and Mr. Robert Rawhouser, 
both Juniors have been chosen to suc- 
ceed the present Editor-in-Chief and 
Business Manager of the La Vie Col- 
^legienne. The position if Managing 
Editor, will b e under the direction of 
Mr. WalDer Krumbeigel, a present 
Sophomore. 

The merit of these appointees can 
scarcely be questioned. Miss Shroyer 
is a major in the department of Eng- 
lish, is especially interested in Journ- 
alism, has established an excellent 
jecord as a writer, and has served 
\on the La Vie Staff for several years. 
By experience and natural bent she 
oppears to be well fitted for the edi- 
torship. 

Mr. Rawhouser's executive and 
managerial ability is unquestioned. 
He will also be able to take an oc- 
casional hand in reporting, having 
served as sports editor on the out- 
going staff. His popularity should 
gain for him the hearty cooperation 
of his assistants on the business 
staff. He will not assume his duties 
howevbr, until the opening of next 
year's term. 

Mr. Krumbeigel, also an English 
major with journalism as his spec- 
ialty, has shown an unusual talent. 
fo r reporting, feature writing, and 
composition. He will doubtless be 
a most valuable assistant to the 
new editor. His rbcord as a member 
of the present staff, coupled w?th his 
ability shown in the regular work 
if the classroom, are respinsible for 
his appointment as Managing Editor 
in spite of the fact that he is an 
underclassman. 

Thb remainder of the staff will be 
chosen by the heads of the old and 
new staffs subject to approval by the 
Faculty and will be installed immed- 
iately after the publication of the 
next issue. 



READERS DISCUSS 

CURRENT MAGAZINES 



The Reader's Club, in a novel pro- 
gram, held their meeting on Wednes- 
day evening, Feb. 18, at Dr. Wal- 
lace's new homie. Instead of discus- 
sing a prominent writer and a few 
of his works, "magazine night" was 
observed. All the prominent current 
magazines wiere presented for com- 
parison and critizism, digests in brief 
of their articles were arranged in a 
very clever manner, and the men 
chosen for the program proved very 
apt in discrimination and in their 
ability ti touch all the "high spots". 
Mr. Robert Eshleman very neatly 
handled The Atlantic Monthly, Har- 
per's Magazine and Schribner's. Mr. 
Edward Sbellenberger followed up in 
usual clear-cut style with Collier's 
The Liberty Fagazine, and The Sat- 
urday Evening Pist, his personal 
comments provoked various reactions 
upon his audience. The Literary Di- 
gest, The Nation, and The New Re- 
public were clearly presented in Mr. 
RusspII Morgan's scientific way. To 
conclude the most entertaining pro- 
gram, Mr. Walter Krumbeigel "put 
on the finishing touches" with his 
kebn distinctions and contrasts of the 
America Mercury and the Forum. To 
these magazies not usually well 
known, he introduced some interest- 
in side lights. All in all. the pro- 
gram Whs declared a most satisfiac- 
ory one, equally entertaining and in- 
structive. After seme clever sum- 
marizing remarks by the president, 
Mr. Paul Evance'e, the meeting came 
to a close. 



CAGE QUINTETTE 
SPLITS EVEN 

F. & M. WINS AGAIN; 
SUSQUEHANNA 
SUCCOMBS 



DEATH CLAIMS 
MR. JOHN MEYER 

NOTED MUSICIAN WAS 
MEMBER OF 
FACULTY 



John Meyer, an outstanding violin 
cellist and member of the Lebanon 
Valley Collegb Faculty died at the 
Homeopathic Hospital in Reading on 
Thursday February 12 after a short 
illness, due to intestinal trouble. 

Mr. Meyer was a member of the 
Wyomissing Trio of Reading and had 
achieved notable success as a soloist 
land in cincert work. His talent was 
not limited to the violin but he played 
the viola and double-bass as wbll. He 
favored us with a few selections dur- 
ing a chapel period som'e time ago. 
Native of Germany, Mr. Meyer com- 
( Continued on Page 4) 



CEDAR CREST WINS 
19-17 VICTORY 



CLOSE CALLING OF FOULS 
SLOWS UP 
GAME 



Cedar Crest defeated the Lebanon 
Valley girls in a clo^e game, with the 
score 19-17, Friday afternoon, in the 
St. John's Lutheran Church in Al- 
lentown. It was a fight from begin- 
ning to end an ( | the victor was un- 
decided until the final blow of the 
whistle. 

The entire contest was one of foul 
shooting. The forwards had little 
opportunity to try many plays be- 
cause of the refree's continuous 
blowing of the whistle for violations 
of ther ulles. There were two offic- 
ials which trended to slow up the 
game as every little technical point 
was noticed and accounted f or. Rupp 
Yingst and Weirick, all made their 
exits via the personal foul route. Had 
they remained in thb game, the 
score might have been a different 
,story. 

Rupp captained the team for Leb- 
anon Valley. Perhaps the honor did 
the work but Rudp placed a fine 
game, her best of the season. Yingst 
and Hershey both had high percent- 
ages in their foul shuuung although 
their field goals were few and far 
between. 

For Cedar Crest Bondy, Captain of 
her squad plaved a neat defensive 
game at guard. Schevenk was the 
(continued on page four) 



Last weekend produced a victory 
and a defeat tor the Lebanon Val- 
ley quintette. ?or tne second straight 
year, Franklin ci Marshall College 
aefeated the local five by one point 
on their floor at Lancaster. L'he next 
night Susquehanna was oeaten in the 
Annville High Gym in a compara- 
tively slow game. 

Franklin & Marshall 

Lebanon Valley started winners 
against & M. and held an 11-2 
auvantage at the end oi tiie first 
quarter. However, ).< .& M. put on 
a spurt and at hall time lead by the 
score of 16-15. 

The second half was nip and tuck 
the whoie way with the neither team 
being able to get a decisive lead. The 
final whistle round F. & M. ahead 
by one point, the score being 32-31. 

Heller was high scorer with five 
field goals and five fouls while Horst 
lead the F. & M. tossers with nine 
points. 

F. & M. was way off in foul shoot- 
ing and might have had a larger 
margin if they could have found their 
shooting eye from the 15 ft. mark. 
However, Lebanon Valley is confi- 
dent of turning the tables when the 
two teams meet next Wednesday 
night. 

Susquehanna 

, Lebanon Valley had Susquehanna 
beaten easily on Saturday night and 
lviyim spent most of the eveniny 

Continued on Page 4) 



DEBATERS BEGIN 

NEW SEASON 



Under the direction of Prof. Stokes 
the men's debating teams are rapid iv 
nearing the conclusion of their work 
in preparation for the coming de- 
bating season. Mr. Patrizio, the 
manager, reports that a formidable 
line-up of opponents has already 
been secured. A full schedule is ex- 
pected. 

The teams, as chosen, are com- 
posed of the following men: Affirma- 
tive, Heilman, Sbellenberger, Wome.' 
and Umberger; Negative, Etter, H. 
H. Mariano, and G. Mariano. Of the 
eight, Heilman, a Sophomore, and 
Etter, a Senior, served on last year'.; 
Affirmative team which made an ex- 
cellent showing by sustaining only 
one defeat throughout the season. 
The remainder have had previous ex- 
perience on high school teams ar.d 
have made records of sufficient merit 
to warrent most optomistic predic- 
tion for this year's contest. 

The debates scheduled thus far arc 
divided among two questions. The 
majority of international free-trade. 
Th>e remainder will be based up; n 
compulsory state unemployment in- 
surance. 

The schedule as completed thus far 
and announced by Patrizio is as fol- 
lows: 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, I'): 1 .! 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

V. weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Morgan, '31 Managing Editor 

.REPORT OBI AIi STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31. 
Ruth Shroyer, '32 
Hilda Buckley, 32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33.Gen'l Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 Business Manager 

P. Keene, '32.. Asst. Business Manager 
C. Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under tne 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



Due to the Anniversary prepara- 
tions, Delphians help a brief session 
on y?riday evening. Devotions were 
conducted) by fthe Chaplain, Marie 
Gelwicks. A griup of vocal selections 
v/ire then rendered by Miss Mildred 
Christiansen; in a very pleasing and 
delightful manner, she sang "Love 
Sends a Litti'3 Gift of Roses", "The 
Gypsy Love Song", and "Sweat heart 
of My Student Days." A short bus- 
iness session brought the meeting to 
a close. 



DESECRATION 



benefits, and thro'wfc to the winds all 
thought for the future. 

But so far as we of Lebanon Val- 
5ey are concerned the deed is done 
and no amends can possibly be made 
A sigh is all that falls to our lot. 
But wb can and we will be prepared 
to do our share in preventing this 
wholesale sacrifice of the scenic 
beauty of our country in the future. 
Active citizenship is before us. We 
herbby vow our eternal opposition to 
any efforts at desecration which it 
shall be within our powers to pre- 
vent. 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



No desecration of the natural beauty 
of the vicinity of Annville has a- 
roused so much protest among the 
present students of Lebanon Valley 
as the cutting down within recent 
weeks of the beautilul willows winch 
formerly lined the local course ot 
the Quittapahilla. The stroke of the 
axe has obliterated some of the finest 
scenery of Lebanon county, scenery 
about which has been twined some 
of the foundest memories of students 
and alumni. 

No longer will the students turn 
to the banks of the Quittie for their 
afternoon strolls. The willows be- 
neath which many a campus ro- 
mance has ripened to maturity will 
whisper their approbation no more. 
The traditional haunt of lovers since 
Lebanon Valley first saw the light 
of day has been abspoiled by thise 
who appreciated neither its natural 
beauty nor its romantic associations. 
Unsightly stumps and uprooted turf 
now talk the place if the low-hang- 
ing willows and the green carpet of 
grass that formerly lined the banks 
of our beloved Quittie. 

This instance is but a forceful re- 
minder of the generall tendency of 
our day toward sacrificing natural 
joeauty in the alter of commercialism. 
Forest, field and stream are daily be- 
ing stripped of the splender that, 
once afforded supreme pleasure to 
the lover of the out of doors, as well 
as a much needed form of recrea- 
tion and escape from the busy whirl 
of modern life for those who are 
caught in its toils. We are reduced 
to gaze upon billboards, telegraph 
poles, unsightly bridges and rubbish 
heaps. The scoarching sun of July 
and August beats down upon the 
parched macadam as it winds through 
man-madb eye-sores, unrelieved by 
'the coil shade of a wayside tree. If 
this devastation is not brought to an 
immediate end, we shall be condemed 
to the torments of beholding the 
drab, monotonous and unpicturesque 
forever. 

Most unbelievable of all is the 
thought that in this case, as in many 
others, there was absolutely no ne- 
cessity for such destruction. The pur- 
pose, we have been told, is to obtain 
fuel for the unemployed. Be it so. 
What foolishness to pick on w'illow? 
A ream or two of paper wiuld serve 
the purpose as well as a cord of such 
wood. And are there not enough 
dead or decaying trees in the sur- 
rounding forests to account for twice 
the number of the willows destroyed? 
There is something decidedly wrong 
with a society that places such a 
premium upon immediate material 



On Minday evening, at a meeting 
of the Delphian Literary Society, the 
third degree was administered to 
the following individuals: Gem Gem- 
mill, Marjorie Miller, Mary Gossard, 
Thelma Shoop, Ruth Mark, Esther 
Smelzer, Evangeline Salerio, Marga- 
ret Lehn, Dorothy Ely, Helen Lane, 
Verna Grissinger, Winnie Miller, 
Minna Wolfskeil, Regina Oiler, 
Dorothy Jackson, and Leona Allen. 



b'enshade on the origin and ancient 
observance of St. Valetine's Day. 
The speech contained several words 
and phrases which were really "ton- 
gue-twisters" but the speaker glided 
over these without the least bit of 
hesitation. The alk was quite in- 
teresting and embodied facts which 
were new to the majority of the lis- 
teners. 

Mathilda Bonninni then delighted 
the girls with a vocal solo, an Italian 
love song, which splendidly displayed 
her charming voice. As an encore 
she sang, a papular number, ''Whist- 
ling the Blues Away." 

In the next number, Eulalie Mor- 
ton and Martha Kreider, dressed as 
a little girl and boy, displayed their 
clogging ability. The dancing ended 
far too soon to please the spectators, 
who were delighted with the perfor- 
mance. 

The last number was rendered by 
one of Clio's members of two years 
ago. The society was glad to wel- 
come back its song-bird, Lorraine 
Seeley. As her contribution to the 
program, she sang "Old Rocking 
Chair" and "Give Me Something to 
Renumber You By". 

With the conclusion of this number, 
the main feature of the evening's en- 
tertainment began: a Valentine Par- 
ty. For the next hour games Ware 
played and dancing was indulged in 
until, as a climax to the party, de- 
licious refreshments were served. 



good chance for a double victory 
Thurs. nite. 



Bucknell lost to Temple by a much 
larger score than the Ow(is beat us; 
thb final score was 62-25. We play 
the Bisons in Lewisburg March 4th. 
We must not expect a snap there. 
Chevoworth the flashy Bucknell for- 
ward was out of the game due to 
illness, that may account for their 
pff ,night. 



Muhlenberg lost to Ursinus last 
week also. We face the Mules in Al- 
lentown Sat. night. They won their 
conference tilts last year but we 
handed them a nice lacing on the 
home floor. It'll be a good game but 
quite a few of our loyal supporters 
will be carrying flowers and strug- 
gling in tuedos that night. Let's make 
the best of it and chalk that game 
up too. 




PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



Stewart held his own and had the 
Mund played two ' crowd on their feet at F. & M. when 
his two foul shots would have tied 
the score. Nice work, Stewart, can't 
be expected to make all of 'em. 



The Philo meeting on Friday, 13 
was called to order by the retiring 
president, Charles Wise. Dr. R. R. 
Butterwick, . visiting thes ociety, 
then conducted devotions. After be- 
ing installed as president, Francis 
Barr then in turn installed the re- 
maining officers. 

The first number was musical 
Richard Slaybaugh rendering two 
selections on the saxaphone, "Here 
Comes the Sun" and "St. Louis 
Blues". "Personality Counts" W>.s the 
subject of a talk by Dwight Grove, 
.selections on the violin, "Meditation 
Next, Fred W 

from Thais", and "La Paloma". Two 
extemporaneous talks then followed 
x'he first, "A Fight Between An 
ALcan Ringworm and a Spanish 
Hoptoad," was handled by Robert 
Rawhouser. The second, "The Wages 
of Sin is Death" was handled by 
Harry Zech. 

Following this Dr. R. R. Butter- 
wick, by special request, gave a short 
talk. He emphasized the necessity 
of the training at present in thinking 
and other cultural pursuits for the 
purpose of fitting one's self for more 
efficient living in the days to come 
Paul Evancoe, acting critic, then 
qommented on the various numbers 
of the program. 

The Philo ping-pong tournament 
lis in full swing, and the tap-tap-tap 
of paddle hitting ball can be heard 
at all hours of the day and evening. 
Rivalry isj intense and all partici- 
pants are working to meet in the fin- 
als. At present the prospects are 
fine for Behney, Keene, Rawhouser, 
and Hughes. However, it is hoped 
by those already eliminated that the 
traditional dark horse will nose these 
professional out. 



The ole "bucketeers" have a nice 
I record for the past week, two wins 
1 and one lost. The heart-breaker came 
at Lancaster Friday night when we 
lost to )?. & M. by a margin of one 
point. 



Heller played marvelous basket- 
ball in all of the games except the 
Susquehanna tilt which turned otu 
to be more of a farce than anything 
else. We won by a sec re of 38-32 
but we can't rave about the perfor- 
mance of any of the players in that 
tilt. 



Mt. St. Mary's brought nice work- 
ing but a hot-headed team to Annville 
Tuesday night. A new center 
strengthened their line-up consider- 
ably and they gave our tossers a 
oiice work-out before the big game 
at the Reading Y. M. C. A. Thurs. 
night with Albright. 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



A business meeting of the Clionian 
ffiterary Society, Friday, February 
6.3, was called to order by the Presi- 
dent, Alma, Benner. Devotions were 
conducted by the chaplain, Dorothy 
Snyder. 

The first number on the program 
was an address by Ann Augusta Es- 



Orsino turned in a very creditable 
performance against the Maryland- 
ers. He had a bucket and foul shot 
to his credit along with a nice dis- 
play of passing and floor work. Atta 
boy Olianus Julianus Orsino, lets 
make a better one Tues. nite. 



The Co-eds suffered two heart-break 
ing but thrilling defeats last week- 
end. They lost to Cedar Crest by a 
margin of two points and came with- 
in two points of stopping the fast 
Wesern Maryland team. Nice work 
girls, let's play good basketball Thurs. 
night and mahe up for the two de 
feats Albright handed us last year, 
'member ? 



Reports say that Big Jim Thorpe 
who won fame with Pop Warner's 
Carlisle Indians some years ago has 
signed to coach the Dichinson foot- 
ball team next year. If Thorpe can 
teach the boys what he knows about 
football there's going to be a big 
change in the kind of competition 
Dickinson offers. He was one of the 
greatest football players of all time, 
He ran the ball and punted better 
than the best of them. Some say 
he made 5 touchdowns against Leb- 
anon Valley in the days of long mus- 
taches and good beer. W3 won't say 
any more about him now, we're 
liable to lose our hope for his suc- 
cess. 



F. & M. will have a new three 
sport coach next y*aar from Ohio 
State. Looks as though Hooks My- 
lin is in for competition, as far as 
coaching extreme are concerned. 



the teacher all make offerings. 

Life is very kind to me. I am quit e 
happy, and Lebanon Valley is dear 
to me, for it has taught me infinitely 
much more than the knowledge gain- 
ed from books. It has given me a 
certain kind of appreciation and con- 
sideration of people. Hence, this col- 
legiate atmosphere is neither boring 
nor unpleasant. It is really too bad 
that 1 cannot divulge the meaning of 
the signature D. P. Perhaps then you 
would understand more clearly. 

iNow, Little- One, don't fret too 
much about what I write. It is very 
plesant to read your thoughts as they 
come 1 to me through La Vie. How- 
ever, let's be friends, even though 
you don't agree with me. 

Yours for better spirit. 
D. P. 



Time again for the brainstorm \ 
Thanks to the efforts of those two 
venomous hecklers namely, D. P. 
and Hero Worshipper I am relieved 
of strenous mental haranguering \ 
(Ten dollar wbrd.) One good thing 
about this controversy it proves that 
at least two people read the La Vie! 
Keep at it, I might want to promote 
a little fisticuff epoch and the pro- 
ceeds will go to some good cause! I 
need socks! 



F. & M. has one of the strongest 
wrestling teams in the east this year 
due to marvelous practical coaching. 
They recently bumped the Uni. of 
Penn off by a large score. 



Let's all go down to Reading Thurs- 
day night and cheer the boys to an- 
other victory, really cheer too, (but 
don't forget the athletic etiquette) A 
special section has been reserved 
and a special bus has been obtained 
for transportation so the only draw- 
back is your decision. Get the old 
pep spirit up and back the team. We 
must (apologies to Prof. Butterwick) 
beat Albright! 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



Ursinus ne of our early season vic- 
tims upset the dopb and made the 
Albright game their fifth straight 
victory they won 38-35. The Ursinus 
girls held the Albright Co-eds to 4 
points while they tallied 35. If com- 
paritive scores mean anything (but 
I'm afraid they don't) we have a 



Dear Editor: 

May I take this opportunity to 
thank "A Hero Worshipper" for the 
numerous bouquets and other expres- 
sions of approbation. Such a clever 
bit of satire deserves much applause 
and I humbly pray that she, for I 
feel that a she wrote that article, 
will honor us with an encore. 

I wonder if my previous article 
was misconstrued. It was primarily 
a plea for tolerance leading to two 
pnds, confidence and friendship. This 
is not an excuse, o r a "let me go", 
for I Still maintain the original state 
ments. However, I am not adverse 
to good reasoning or truth. 

In imy mind, friendship is the 
scource ofl ife, in order to appreciate 
life we must live. Therefore, lets 
be friends with everyone as long as 
possible, and while we may, drink 
3ong and Ideep., True living is a 
succession of gifts; we offer our 
selves, with all our virtues and faults, 
whd blessed be the one whi accepts. 
The business man offers himself, the 
clergyman offers himself, the profes- 
sional man, the labor, the student, 



Being from Red Lion I can under- 
stand why Dutchy Thompson takes 
off her shoes and walks the campus 
in her stocking! feet. Have hearti 
that it took the National Guard, fire 
department and G. A. R. to catch 
Phots. Kniselv so they could put shoes 
on him to get him to college! This 
is only a rumor though and one of 
his room mates is responsible. (With 
no malice aforethought). 



Can you imagine my embarrass- 
ment! The other evening I was in 
the act of putting on my one and 
only suit of clothes when I sudden- 
ly made a startling discovery. The 
cleaners had sent me my own Coat 
and Vest but the trousers would have 
made a perfect fit for some Colossal 
hombre like Lloyd Hamilton. I looked 
like a Ringling Brothers tent in a 
cyclone ! 



Recently I have asked several 
Prominent 'Socializers" on the cam- 
pus just when the Junior Prom, 
comes off? Guess I was wrong as 
some one asked in return, "What 
Junior Prom?" I hate to be called 
an agitator, but I would sure like 
to see a Junior Prom, on this cam- 
pus. What say? 



Wonder why our future contribu- 
tion to the Baseball world left his 
designated table in the Dining hall? 
Oh, bubble-eyes! 



Wonder what the girls talk about 
when they get in to that huddle just 
before a Basket-Bali game starts- 
I'll lay two to one it is either clothes 
or the guy with the buck-teeth in the 
far east corner." Females are queer 
critters but nice to have around. 



Let's set a precedente! Let's no 
call the boys who buy flowers, "J° e 
Bass" Saturday night! The idea may 
be silly and all that but it puts a 
fellow in a terrible hole. I know 
got all "goose-fleshy" when SW» 
wisehieimer put the bird on 10 
It's just an old Spanish custom- 



Wil the guy who was snooping ^ 
my dresser please leave his n 
and address as I have some thing 
I would like to get rid of! 



S'all fer this week! Don \ f ° rget J? 
contribute a name for this "Kolyu 
0. H. S. 



LA VIE CQLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1931 



PAGE THREE 




<j,he lamb that followted Mary was 
As pretty as you please. 

gut a cur onde followed after it 
And now the fleec'a has fleas. 



]\Ioose — Why do old maids wear 
cotton gloves? 

Bob — Because they haven't any 
kids! 

The question of the hour is "What 
time is it?" 



Ain't it tough, 
'Girls? 

When you cuddlte close 
To the boy-friend 
And you run your soft 
Finger 

Upward along his 
Cheek, 

Ain't it tough? 



People in gas houses shouldn't light 
matches. 



Skee — What does a Christmas tree 
stand for? 

Dean — Well, it would look sort of 
silly lying down. 



Many a true word is said in a di- 
vorce court. 



Charlie Myers wants to know if he 
saw a girls with the heel of her shoe 
coming off would her name be Lu- 
cille. 



There was onck a man who had 
a mania for traveling, and to such 
and to such an extent that he could 
not agree with anyone else. One day 
he went in a trip to the South Seas, 
and was shiprecked on an unknown 
coast. He fell in with a group of 
cannibals — and he agreed with them. 



The bedding guest he beat his 
breast 

The bells began to toll 
But still the stud refused to go 
Into the buttonhole. 



"The baby shallowed a bottle of 
ink." 
"Incredible I" 
"No, indelible." 



Taylor — I have a fine voide for tell- 
ing risque jokes. 
Allen What's that. 
Taylor— Guttural. 



K rummy — Yes, they have some 
elberg. 

Lee— What the 

Krummy — Yes, they have sime 
S( *napp courses thiere. 



p rof. Grimm— What is a vacuum : 
Gardner — I have it in my head but 
ca n't think of it just now. 



Oh Gitis is a town of crooks," 
We had a dear friend write us; 
He said he was attacked by 
The awful men-in-gitis. 



D °U-That candy just makes my 
m °^h o^ter. 
Prank— Here's a blotter. 



iiia 



A lady from far Alabama, 
Was trying to wield a large ham- 



Put s he hit her toenail, 
And was sent to jail, 
v or using such very bad gramma. 



The PRIVATE SECRETARY 



j^ e ^e simply adores Shelly and 
. Th" 



th. 



er e isn't a thing more essential 
* World than a wonderful fig- 



write. She keeps a diary of cher- 
ished thoughts, cynical reminiscen- 
Her main ambition in life is to 
ceo. 

Her family has a Packard; simply 
geo;rgeous; ^mioth, she caJU'e it. Of 
course their entire home is operated 
by electricity. Simply couldn't use 
anything else. 

The bunch at home are all of - the 
best families. Didn't she get Sally 
Smith into the crowd? Believe me, 
heropinion carried weight! It it had 
not been for her, poor Sally would 
still be running around the streets 
weeping and wailing for a friend. 

Friendship is the most beautiful 
thing in tfre while world. She has 
lots of friends, picks them herself, 
and they positively fall all over them- 
selves to be the chosen few. Of course 
they are of the best families, awfully 
well known, you know. 

Her horse, Dan, is a gorgeous crea- 
ture. No one else can ride Dan. Most 
unmanageable creature except when 
she gets her hand on the rein. 

They have a summer camp. Best 
one on the river. Oh, ytes, every- 
body comes to their camp. Her canoe 
is simply darling; all blue; and -she 
wears a darling blue bathing suit to 
match. No, she never had another 
color except whten the canoe was a 
different color. 

She never drinks. Considers it pos-i 
itively disgusting. 

Her people treat her terribly. She 
doesn't s*ee why she can't have more 
clothes. 

She just must get fat and get a 
nice figure. 

She is madly in love, but he doesn't 
love her. He is wonderful so sophis- 
ticated. And he had to flunk out! 




Another essay in immitation of the 
style of Sir Francis Bacon appears 
below. The author is Mr. Edmund 
Umberger. The author of last week's 
composition, whose name was over- 
looked, was Mr. Caplan of Freshman 
fame. 



OF IMITATION 



All imitation doth approximate the 
progress of a streamlet, which gath- 
ers in its content from a thousand 
sources. Crescit eundo: it arriveth at 
a swollen river and is blended into 
what we term originality* But this 
is in man's natural vein; he is an 
imitative creature, and who is fore- 
most leads the herd. There is in 
literary art more than a modicum 
of imitation, and, as of all things, 
good and bad. The scheming copy- 
ist, who doth hope to palm off" for* 
his own the work of others, well 
merits the invective of the ancient 
Horace: Imitatores! servum pecus. 
These are a lowly group; their a- 
pings are without avail. The master 
imitated by the ignoramus gains in 
lustre by the all-revealing token of 
comparison. The copy may have all 
the pomp of the model, without the 



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fords it may have all the nodosities 
of the oak withoiitits strength; it may 
have all the contortions of the sibyl, 
without the inspiration. Thus are we 
led to contemn thee ounterfiet. But 
happily there is another type of lit- 
erary patterning. In divers of our 
universities, the student striving to 
master the rhetoric doth put himself 
before a standard of good writing 
and doth seek to instil into his own 
work some of the graces of the other. 
If We succeed in doing so, then he 
doth profit twofold, by contract and 
by improvement; if not, he gains but 
by asociation. 

However, there is yet another form 
of imitation: that" of the person, 
through either habit or affectation. 
Of the latter type is th>e pretending 
of one who saith, like the bard, Yet 
herein will I imitate the sun. Such 
display is. mimicry and all too often 
patterns after standards undeserv- 
ing. As Montaigne aptly saith. A 
man must' either imitate the vicious 
or hate them. It is better a thousand 
times to have the real self glow from 
within fhaii to don the habits of a 
puppet. Then there is that imita- 
tion,; not by volition, as in the fop- 
pish | mimic, but inbred, as through 
association and long' mulling in the 
mind. This seats itself most deeply, 
and presents itself, in some degree, in 
all of us. When it is evidenced ex- 
ceedingly, there are those who would 
decry it ; but, as in all, the motive 
determineth the . ultimate dignity of 
the act. 




(A. Sophomore program was ren- 
dered at the "Friendly Hour", on 
Sunday evening; the subject discus- 
sed was "Georgb Washington, His 
Life and Character." The leader for 
the evening was Arlene Heckrote, 
"nd it was she who conducted a help- 
ful devotional period based on St. 
John, the twelfth chapter. Ruth .Co- 
ble talked on "Washington, the Christ- 
ian," emphasizing his early religious 
training his habits of prayer before 
battles" and before Congress meet- 
ings; all'' of these points tended to 
show that Washington was just as 
ideal in his religious life as he was 
in his national life. Miriam Silvius 
then read or told a series of "Anec- 
dotes of Washingtin;" these were 
both humorous and serious, and help- 
ed to bring out some of his outstand- 
ing characteristics. Marian Kruger 
paid tribute to Washington in poet- 
ry; she r!e|d "Mount Vernon", a ser- 
ious, reverent poem concerning "The 
Father of our Countrp"; and also 
"Washingtonites", a delightful, hu- 
morius bit djf" verse. "America the 
Beautiful" sang in unison bnought 
the metering to a close. 



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ISN'T IT 

TIME 
YOU • • • 



TELEPHONED 

^Mother and Dad 
? 




Pay Them a 

VOICE VISIT 

Tonight 

Take a trip back home tonight. No need 
for railroad tickets. Just go to the near- 
est telephone, give the Operator your 
home telephone number — and in a very 
few moments you'll be there, talking 
with Mother and Dad. 
It's next best to actually seeing them! 
Make it a habit to call up the folks once 
a week. Have a regular telephone date 
with them. Fix a day and hour for your 
call. 

The cost is small — and the charges can 
be reversed if you wish. 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1931 



CAGE QUINTETTE 

SPLITS EVEN 



(Continued from Page 1) 



trying out various combinations. 
Most of the game was played by 
substitutes. 

The starting lineup of Stewart 
Sprenkle, Heller and the two Light 
brothers had little difficulty in ob- 
taining a lead. With the score 19-6 
in our favor, substitutions began ar- 
riving thick and fast. They played 
the remainder of the first half and 
most of the second period. 

Susquehanna found the second 
ptring me easier and pulled up to 
within four points. At this point ttta 
regulars were again called back in 
the fray. This time the had difficul- 
ty in getting going with thte result 
that the game was close from thbn 
on, the final score being 37-32. 

Sprinkle was high scorer for he 
locals with twelve points to his cred- 
it. He made the best showing of 
any running mate Stewart has had 
this year. Rummel lead the Sus- 
quehanna five with twelve points. 

The imain virtue of Susquehanna's 
game was their ability to drop in the 
foul shots. They caged sixteen out 
of the twenty threb chances given 
them from the foul line. 

Lebanon Valley 
Stewart F. 3 3 9 

Sprenkle F. 2 2 

Orsino F. 

Morrison F. 

Heller C. 5 5 15 

S. Light G. 113 
Wogan G. 

Frey G. 10 2 

M. Light G. 

10 11 31 
Franklin & Marshall 

G p F 
Brubaker F. 2 4 

Passell p. 4 8 

Foley F. 113 
Fridenberg C. 3 6 

Horst G. 4 19 

Staton G. 10 2 

15 2 32 
Refree-Greinbr; LTmpire-'Dilheh. 
Lebanon Valley 

G pi P 
Stewart F. 4 2 10 

Morison F. 

Wiliams F. 10 2 

Orsino F. 

Reeder F. 10 2 

Sprenkle F. C. 4 4 12 

H, Light F. f 

Leathern JF. C 

Heller C. 2 4 

Shrom C. 

S. Light G. 2 3 7 

M. Light G. 

Wogan v. i 

14 9 37 

Susquehanna 

Rubis F. 10 2 

Rummel <F. 3 6 12 

Kozak F. 15 7 

Capie F. 

Palmer C. C 

McGeehan G. 1 1 3 

Glenn G. 2 4 8 

8 16 32 

Referee — Boyer. 



CEDAR CREST WINS 

19-17 VICTORY 



(Continued from Page 1) 



outstanding shot, contributing six- 
teen of her teams score. 

The score at the half was 8-9 fav- 
or Cedar Crest. Lebanon Valley was 
unable to overcome the lead, again 
making one point less in the second 
half. 

Perhaps the day, Friday thel3th 
day had something to do with t'h'3 
defeat. However the girls played 
a good game even though the final 
score spoke against them. 

Lebanon Valley 

G F T 
Yingst R. F. 2 6 10 



Gemm'ii R. F. 





1 


1 


Hershey L. r . 


1 


4 


6 


Engle C. 











Gosard C. 











Armacost S. C. 











Rupp R. G. 











Fields R. G. 











Weirick L. G. 











Brant L. G. 


o 


o 











17 


Cedar 


Crest 








G 


F 


T 


Waage R. p. 





1 


1 


Barelore R. F. 





2 


2 


Schevenk L. F. 


4 


8 


16 


Smead C. 











Lindor C. 











|Jacobi S. C. 











Zeigner S. C. 











Bandy R. G. 











Searl<3 L. G. 

















19 



Referee, Lehceka. Umpire, Rich- 
ards. 

DEATH CLAIMS 

MR. JOHN MEYER 



(.Continued from Page 1) 



pleted the full course in the conser- 
vatory of Dr. Hoch at Frankfort-on 
the-Maine in Germany. At one time 
We was a pupil of Alvia Schroeder 
first cellist of the Boston Symphony 
orchestra. Previous to coming to A- 
merica he played in the Frankfort 
Symphony orchestra under such noted 
conductors as Richard Strauss and' 
Dr. Karl Muck. 

He organized the Harrisburg 
String Quartette in which Harold 
Walsh of the music faculty plays 



fm 



A -l SKTL* 
WORKS WONDERS 




ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 

207 W. Main 



second violin, and had been putting 
jTorth great effort and interest in the 
organization of an orchestra com- 
posed of conservatory students here 
on the campus. His death is regret- 
ted by many, and his loss is certain 
to be felt, for although a member of 
the faculty only since the beginning 
of this year, he was considered a 
worthy and famous addition to the 
music department. His work will be 
carried on by M'r. Walsh, violinist 
of Harrisburg. 



GIRLS HOLD DOWN 

FAST M'LAND TEAM 



(Continued from Page 1) 



phy of Western Maryland placed 
some Well-timed shots, easily being 
high scorer with fifteen points to her 
credit. Ebough was a nice running 
mate and together they made a neat 
combination of forwards. Cockbrun, 
side-center for Western Maryland 
showed her audience how much 
ground can be gained by a bounce 
and a pivot, adding som'e spectular 
plays to the game. 

Hershey was "on" with her field 
goals but she, as well as Miller, 
didn't seem to be able to plac'e their 
foul shots. 

The final score was 22-19 in favor 
of the Westminister team. 



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LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 

School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 

Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



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The Pennway 

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LOCALS OUTPLAY 

MT. ST. MARY'S 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Lebanon Valley 

G 

Stewart F. 6 
Morrison F. 
Sprenkle F. 
Orsino F. 3 
Heller C. 6 
S. Light G. 
F. Light G. 1 
Frey G. 1 
17 

.. Mt. St. Mary's 
G 

Chanowski F. 1 
Lynch F. 5 
Zubris F. 
ChalkKey C. 5 
Connel G. 
Edeler G. 1 
Bonner G. 1 
Gray G. 
13 

Referee — Boyer. 



F 
1 

2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



F 
X 



1 

2 



4 



P 

13 

2 
7 

13 
1 
3 
3 

42 

P 
3 
10 


11 

2 
2 
2 

30 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



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The Dovan Chemical Company, on 
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South Africa which eventually w jjj 
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trade. One American firm buys 3o 
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SUCCESS 
TO THE NEW 
STAFF 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



WE 

CONGRATULATE 
DELPHIAN 



VOLUME VII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1931. 



No. 14 



Delta Lambda Sigma Observes Anniversary 



MILNE'S "ROM ANTIC AG E" IS ENACTED 

CAROLINE FISHER STARS IN LEADING ROLE. TECH- 
NICAL DIFFICULTIES ARE OVERCOME UNDER 
ABLE DIRECTION OF MISS WALLACE 



The Delphian Literary Society ob- 
served its ninth anniversary on Sat- 
urday evening-, February 21st, by 
presenting "The Romantic Age", by 
A,. A. Milne. Before the rise of the 
curtain Mrs. David Shroyer gave the 
invocation and Miss Dorothy Hafer 
sang two selected songs. This was 
immediately followed by the welcom- 
ing address of the Anniversary Pres- 
ident, Miss Caroline Fisher. 

The scenfe of the Romantic Age, 
a modern three act comedy is laid in 
England; the time, an enchanting 
June evening. The interest of the 
story centers around Melinsande, who 
is romantic to the nth degree. She 
refuses to marry Bobby Coote because 
his everyday clothes do not give an 
air of romance to his courting. In- 
stead Mielisande falls in love wdth 
Gervase Mallory, who was on his way 
to a fancy Cress ball and had stopped 
at her father's home for assistance. 
In delightful contrast to Melisande 
is her cousin, Jante Bagot, a very prac- 
tical twentieth century girl, who sym- 
pathizes with Bobby and later be- 
comes engaged to him. 

Caroline Fisher portrayed the sole 
of Melisande unusually well. She 
created the atmosphere of romance 
throughout in her actions and in the 
quality of tone in her speeches and 
certainly registered the proper de- 
gree of disgust when anything as 
mundane as ""bread sauce" was men- 
tioned in connection with love and 
romance. 

Gervase Mallory, thfe hero, was ex- 
ceptionally well acted by Frank Fern- 
sler, who made his stage debut on 
the L. V. C. campus in this presenta- 
tion. His interpretations of thle part 
was flawless. His bearing, his man- 
ne r, and the perfect ease and non- 
chalance which he showed through- 
out the entirta production contributed 
greatly to the "romantic glamor" of 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Melinsade's "Prince". 

Trula Koch's performance of Mrs. 
Knowles, Melisande's mother lent a 
bit of comedy to the play, which was 
otherwise without much action. The 
bit of humor contributed by her part 
was successfully carried throughout 
the first and third acts. 

Another bit of humor, which en- 
livened the second act was the role 
of Ern, portrayed with great success 
by Clarence Early. As a character 
actor the future looks- promising for 
Bab'e. 

Marion Kruger, as Jane Bagot, 
Melisande's cousin, entered fully in- 
to the spirit of her part and gave a 
most excellent and capable perfor- 
mance. 

Robert MeCusker, as Mr. Knowles, 
revealed a stage presence that be- 
speaker of experience. 

George Derickson took the part of 
Bobby Coote. The audience was in 
accord with Melisande when she re- 
fused hish half-hearted courtship. 
Others in the cast were: Samuel Ul- 

( Continued on Page 4) 



GIRLS NOSE OUT 
ALBRIGHT STARS 

EVENLY MATCHED TEAMS 
PLAY CLOSE 
GAME 



Thursday, Feb. 26 — Debate in 
Philo Hall at 8:00 with 
Western Maryland. 

Friday, Feb. 27— Regular Lit- 
erary Meetings of Philo, 
Kalo, Clio and Delphian. 
Girls Basket Ball game at 
Juniata. 

Saturday, 'Feb. 28— Basket Ball 
game with Gettysburg Col- 
lege in Lebanon High School 
at 8:00 P. M. 

Sunday, Feb. 29— Friendly Hour 
at 5:45. North Hall Parlor. 

Thursday, Mar. 4— Basket Ball 
game with Bucknell at 
Bucknell. 



Before a loyal crowd of supporters 
the girl's basketball team of Leba- 
non Valley College overcame the fast 
moving Albright sextette by the score 
of 26-25 in the Y. M. C. A. building 
in Reading, February 19th. 

It was a pull from first to last. 
Both teams were good and about ev- 
enly matched. The rivalry between 
the tlWo schoils helpbd to incite the 
girls to play their best. 

In the first few minutes of play it 
looked as though Albright would be 
an easy winner, Albright having four 
goals in a very short time. However 
the Lrebanin Valley team was n|ot 
slow in overcoming her bad begin- 
ning. The score at the quarter stood 
8-6 favoring the Reading lassies. The 
scoring continued on an even pace 
until the end of the half when the 
result terms of the score was 12-10, 
Albright still leading. 

In the second half of the fray, the 
L. V. C. stars did some extremely 
good playing and soon ran a lead of 
ten points over Albright. But it was 
short-livbd. The Albright team with 
renewed vigor did som rieat passing 
work and began to overtake their op- 
pinents. In the last seconds of the 
game Porter made some clear shots 
which considerably swelled the Al- 

( Continued on Page 3) 



DEBATERS TO BE IN 

ACTION TRTjRS. NIGHT 

The men's debating teams will clash 
with Western Maryland Tnursuay 
evening, Feb. 26, in the fust oi a 
series of dual intercollegiate forensic 
skirmishes. The Aaimative team 
will travel to Westminister while tne 
Negative team crosses sworus at 
home. The question in tms as well 
as the majoirty of suoceeanig uebates 
is: Resolved: that the naaons „i the 
world adopt a policy of free traue. 

The schedule, as announced b., 
manag<erPatrizio, is as follows: 

March 6 — Waynesburg 

March 11 — Susquehanna 

March 12 — Eiizabethtown 

March 18— Franklin & Maichall 

April 15 — Bridgewater 

Pending — Bucknell 
Albright 
Ursinus. 



LA VIE STAFF 
IS COMPLETED 

WILL PUBLISH FIRST 
ISSUE NEXT 
WEEK 



The new staff of the La Vie Col- 
legienne to serve during the 1931-32 
t/erm under the leadership of Miss 
Ruth Shroyer was completed this 
week by the newly-elected Editor-in 
-Chief and Business Manager in con- 
sultation with the faculty advisers. 
Exculsive of the Managing Editor, 
Mr. Walter Krumbeigel, who was ap- 
pointed last week, the remainder of 
the staff is as follows: 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
Fred Mund, '32, Hilda Buckley, '32, 
Anne Esbenshade, '32. 

GENERAL REPORTERS 
Dorothy Garber, '32, Elizabeth Ul- 
rich„'32, Edward Shellenberg'er, '33, 
Edmund Umberger, '34. 

CONSERVATORY 
George Snowhill, '34. 

ATHLETICS 
Percy Clements, '32. 

ALUMNI 
Glora LaVenture. '33. 

CLIONIAN 
Jane Muth, '33. 

DELPHIAN 
Arline Heckrote, '33 

KALOZETEAN 
Clarence Early, '33. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
Chester Goodman, '33. 
ASST. BUSINESS MANAGER 
Herman Mariani, '33. 

CIRCULATION MANAGER 
Paul Kleinfelter, '32. 
With the exception of the business 
manager, the new staff will enter up- 
on its duties with the publication of 
next Week's issue. The retiring edi- 
tors join in wishing their successors 
the full cooperation if the campus 
and a successful administration. 



RECITAL ATTRACTS 
MUSIC LOVERS 

VARIED PROGRAM GIVEN 
BY CONSERVATORY 
STUDENTS 



The regular monthly recital, given 
by students of the Conservatory was 
.ieid m Engle Hall on Tuesday ev- 
ening, February 24, at eight o'clock. 
The opening number of the program 
was a piano solo "Rustles of Spring" 
by Suiding, played by Sarah Light, 
a techinacal ability and worthy of no- 
tice. A lovely organ number, Gon- 
nod's "Hymne a' St. Cecile", by Kath- 
ryn Louise Witmer was the next fea- 
ture. This was played with ease and 
skill. Kathryn Lutz then favored the 
'audience with a group of two songs 
Minor Rhapsidy" of. Brahms and 
'Love Like the Dawn Came Steal- 
ing" by Cadman and "Invocation to 
Life" by Spross, revealing a voice of 
purety and flexibility. Following this; 
Robert Heath delighted the audience 
with two piano selections, the "G 
McDowell's "Rigandon". Mr. Heath, 
besides having a very pleasing style, 
gave evidence of lovely interpreta- 
tion and depth of feeling. Newton 
Burgner then brought forth delight- 
ful tonal beauties and showed marked 
interpretation, in his rendering of 
''Meditation" by Sturges, at the or- 
gan. Another group of songs "Come 
Thou at Dawning" by Kountz, "A 
Brown Bird Singing" by Wood, and 
"I Look Into Your Garden", also by 
Wood, was then featured by Har- 
vey Horn, who disclosed a voice of 

(Continued on Page 4) 



SENIORS HAND FROSH 
THIRD STRAIGHT DEFEAT 



LUCK DESERTS 
LOCAL TEAM 

LOSE TO ALBRIGHT BY 
A SINGLE 
POINT 



Lebanon Valley hit an off night in 
shooting last Satrday night and con- 
sequently dropped a game to Muh- 
lenberg 30-25 at Allentown. 

The Blue and White quintette 
started good and at one time had a 
10-0 lead. By half time this lead had 
dwindled to four points, the score 
b'eing 19-15. 

The second half, Muhlenberg out- 
classed Lebanon Valley, running up 
fifteen points while holding our of- 
fensive to six points, the lowest num- 
ber tallied by a Blu/e and White five 
in years. One field goal early in 
the half and four fouls represented 
thte total. Most of the time was vain- 
ly spent in trying ti find the basket. 

In the final analysis the game was 
lost in foul shooting. While Muhlen- 
berg put in twelve out of seventeen 
foul shots, Lebanon Valley was able 
to cage only five of their thirteen 

(Continued on Page 4) 



The Seniors defeated the Freshmen 
on Wednesday evening 35-23 in as 
Interclass basketball game. 

The game was not as exciting as 
the former ones in the league due 
to the fact that there was nothing 
at stakes. It gave the Frosh their 
thir straight defeat and put the Sen- 
iors in a position to enter a triple 
tie in case the Sophomores should 
upset the dope and bleat the Juniors 
next week. 

The first half of the contest was 
featured by some fancy long shoot- 
ing. "Red" Rugh started the game 
with two long shots but "Abe" Bowers 
retaliated with three shots from near 
the center of the floor in quick suc- 
cession. The Freshmen had the lead 
for a short while but thie Seniors 
forged ahead and lead 20-18 at half 
time. 

The upperclassmen opened up in 
the second period and the Freshmen 
nevter had a chance after that. The 
final score found the Seniors leading 
35-23. 

"Joe" Wood was again high scorer 
with eleven points. Bowers had ten 
fir the Frosh while Patrizio and Rugh 
each caged 'eight. 



ROCKETEERS SINK 
F.&M. AND P.M.C. 

STEWART AND HELLER 
RUN UP HIGH 
SCORES 



Lebanon Valley registered another 
victory on Monday evening this time 
against P. M. C. by the score of 37- 
25. The game was played at Chester, 
Pa. 

P. M. C. put up a stiff battle 
;throughout the whole game. They 
played a hard game with the result 
that there was some rough playing. 

"Bob" Stewart had an "on night" 
and dropped ten field gials through 
the basket. Half of these wtere shots 
from the side of the court that cut 
the nets clean. His twenty one point 
total was the highest gathered in a 
game by a Blue and White player this 
season 

Lebanon Valley lead through most 
of the game the score at half time 
being 21-16 in our favor. 

Lebanon Valley gained sweet re- 
venge for the one point defeat at 
Lancaster by trouncing F. & M. Wed. 
night in the Lebanon High School 
gymnasium by the score of 37-22. 
After the -middle of the fist half, the 
Mylinmen had the visitors at their 
mercy. 

The game was a far different type 
than had been expected. Lebanon 
Valley played conservatively espec- 

(Continued on Page 4) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1931. 



Jfo Hie &Qlk$um\£ 

ESTABLISHED 1925 

^ weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Morgan, '31 Managing Editor 

REPORT O RIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31. 
Ruth Shroyer, '32 
Hilda Buckley, 32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33.Gen'l Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 Business Manager 

P. Keene, '32.. Asst. Business Manager 

C. Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under tne 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



WE PART 



With the publication of this issue, 
the 1930-31 La Vie Staff retires from 
office. We have a suspicion that we 
do not trail with us very many 
"clouds of glory"; someone may even 
pull a stunt as crude as Saturday 
night's performance. But anyway 
we've tried and so with more or less 
of regret and less or more of re 
lief we yield the reins to our suc- 
cessors, wishing for them the sup- 
port and constructive criticism wt 
vainly hoped for, and earnestly pray- 
ing that they may be spared the 
ever-ready brickbat. 



ARE WE CIVILIZED 



Well, it's a question, and a two- 
sided one at that, if we. are to judge 
by the action of some of our refined 
students last Saturday evening. Some- 
times we think we are, and then — 
Well, there must be some people 
more civilized than others, that's as 
charitable as we can be. 

You see, my dear hyena (or what 
have you, there are some people still 
alive who are less foundly disposed 
toward modern college life than tht 
initiated few. They are prejudicec 
rather strongly against the college 
man with his senseless antics anc 
they don't mind letting the world 
know it. Nor does it seem that the 
"razzing" of participants in a play 
in the presence of the general pub- 
lic is very convincing proof that they 
are wrong. 

After all, this is a country in 
which free speech is guaranteed ab 
golutely to every citizen. If you don't 
like a performance tell those who are 
responsible for its appearance your 
opinion in full. As long as you tell 
the truth, they can't hurt you for it 
Of course if you happen to lack a 
spine, serious difficulties are in the 
way of any such open and above- 
board procedure. Even then you have 
no right to interfere with your 
neighbor who may have sufficient in- 
telligence and good taste to see the 
point and be edified thereby. Or if 
the worst come to the worst, he may 
prefer to suffer in silence. 

Please let's be decent about such 
matters in the future. If we have 
personal grievances to avenge, let's 
be manly about it. If we fail to ap- 
preciate the efforts of others to en- 
tertain us, let's bear in mind that w|> 
are under no compulsion to witness 
their pbrf ormance that we would prob- 
ably do much worse ourselves if we 
were taking their places, and that 
since admission is free, no mercenary 
considerations are present to dis- 
suade us from sitting in the "peanut 



gallery" of the local hippodrome and 
venting our uncivilized spleen to our 
heart's content. 



WANTED— A GENIUS 



If someone wants a problem for 
investegation, something with lots of 
local color in it, here's a suggestion. 
How can we inject new life into our 
Jfast-expiring school spirit and enable 
it to withstand the ravages of the 
balmy days of spring? Not that it's 
a purely local problem at all. It 
isn't. Every campus has to contend 
with this decay of the old spirit of 
loyalty to the institution, incident to 
the adoption of mass priduetion meth- 
ods of education. 

How can we present the great di- 
versification of interest, nesulting 
from minute specialization in the 
choice of college wqrk, from sub- 
merging group-ideals in self consid- 
eration? How can a too intense in- 
dividualism be curbed, and social at- 
titudes be put in its place? Finally, 
what can the existing organizations 
da to fit their programs to the needs 
of the sudents and hereby enlist their 
support ? 

That a general revision of the aims 
and methods of the campus activities 
from the literary societies down to 
the smallest clubs, is necessary we 
all admit. But who posesses suffic- 
ient genius, sufficient foresight, suf- 
ficient courage to tackle the task? 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



The Philo program on Friday, Feb- 
ruary, 20 was purely literary. Fran- 
cis Barr, the president, called the 
meeting to order, and Paul K. Keene 
conducted the devotional exercises. 

Paul Emenheiser opened the pro- 
gram with a talk on, "The Funny 
Side of a Preacher's Lif'a." He kept 
his audience highly amused and in- 
terested by telling humorous anec- 
dotes relative to the ministry. Charl'as 
Wise then gave a very spicy im- 
promptu talk on "The Social Condi- 
tions in Philo." As no meeting is 
considered complete without having 
John D. Hughas on the speaker's 
stand, Jonnie hytfas given the topic, 
"Main Street," to speak on extem- 
poraneously. True to reputation, he 
kept the attention of tha group by 
his flow of words and gift of humor. 
The last number was "Living 
Thoughts" given by Amos Knisely. 

Substituting for the editor, Woodrow 
Dellinger, he ably proved his worth 
as a ready and convincing speaker. 
After the critics remarks by Charles 
Wise, and an interesting discussion 
on the good of the order, a very suc- 
cessful Philo meeting was adjourned. 




The regular business meeting of 
Jlionian Literary Society, Friday, 
February 20, was called to order by 
the President, Alma Binner. After 
:he business had been conducted, de- 
votions were led by the Chaplain, 
Dorothy Snyder. 

The program of the evening was 
an exceptionally good one. It was an 
Driginal, clever skit in two acts, pre- 
sented by the Freshman girls. 

The first act took place at an af- 
,erncon tea given by Gertrude Paul. 
Her gtiasts ware Betty Shaak and 
Jatherine Lcu.se Witmer. By way of 
entertainment at the tea, Mathilda 
3onanni sang an Italian Composi- 
tion. During the course of the af- 
ernoon, tho hostess surprised her 
guests by announcing her engage- 
ment. 

in the second act, Miss Paul, with 
he assistance of her two friends, 
Misses Shaak and Witmer, was in 
-h!a process of selecting her trous- 
seau. The young ladies were seen 
in a fashion shop which was owned 
by Madame Fontaine. Miriam Book 
pleased the audience with her clever 
impersonation of the French lady. 
Mannequins displayed the gowns to 
the fiancee and her friends. Sport 
apparel was worn by Anna Matula, 
Emily Brant, Emma Fasnacht, Mar- 
garet Longenecker, and Charlotte 
Weirick. Tennis, swimming, skating, 
golf, and hocky costumes were dis- 
played ,by this group which gave a 
sport dance which contained origin- 
al steps. Afternion gowns were 
shown by Haidee Blubaugh, Margaret 
Longenecker, Christine Gruber, and 
Matilda Bonanni. The two latter 
rendered a violin duet — "Barcarolle" 
from Tales of Hoffman. Lingerie was 

displayed by Emily Brant and Mar- 
garet Kohler. The models for even- 
ing gowns were Mildred Bomberger, 
who beatifully told in song, about her 
"Alice Blue Gown". Pajamas of var- 
iius colors and styles wiere displayed 
by Mathilda Bonanni, Charlotte Wei- 
rick, Haidee Blubaugh, Christine Gru- 
ber, Mildred Nye, and Mildred Bom- 
berger. These girls concluded the 
program with a sKeepy time dance. 

Much talent was displayed in the 
program, and Clio uttered many ex- 
clamations of praise and pride for 

its new members. 



Our tossers broke even in the last 
four tilts during the past week. Not 
bad when we consider that one loss 
was by a margin of one point. The 
other should have been an easy vic- 
tiry but it happened to be our "off" 
night and the "Mule" kicked in with 
a five point win. 



The Albright games will long be 
remembered as the most thrilling 
we've witnessed in a long time. The 
girls won by one point. Good Brother 
Karlip of football fame intercepted 
an intended "freeze" and countered a 
two pointer to "sew" up the headline 
tilt. L, V. C. had 36-35 with 27 sec- 
onds to play — but a lot happened in 
that 27 seconds — and how! 



Muhlenberg — A dark horse team 
come thru and handed our boys a nice 
little trimming, the final score was 
30-25. We led at the half time by a 
safe margin but during the latter 
part of the game our scoring was 
confined to one field goal — a record 
for our toshers but not one to brag 
about! 



Pennsylvania Military College pre- 
sented keen competition Mon. night 
at Chester but they found the Blue 
and White a little too tough to hand- 
le. We won by a score of 36-23. 



Stewart walked off with scoring 
honors for the season in a single tilt 
by chalking up 21 points against P. 
M. C. Ten field goals and one foul 
shot are enough points for any man 
to make. Nice work Stewart; ke>ep it 
up. We only have three more games. 



F. and M. received quite a set back 
in Lebanon Wed. night. The first 
of the game was slow but later on 
Stew and Gal got going and the game 
was soon on ice. 



Heller made the centers from Lan- 
caster look like a couple of ping-pong 
players in the wrong riew. He made 
twelve points and only had one foul 
chalked up against! him despite the 
attempts of our opponents to get him 
"riled up". 



Stewart led the scorers again in 
this tilt with a total of 16 points. 
Stew had his guard wondering what's 
going to happen next. We usually 
know — it's a two pointer or "slips" 
with him when he's "on". 



Max Light has been displaying a 
wonderful brand of basketball in the 
recent games. Against Albright he 
made his man look "ill'; at times a- 
gainst F. & M. he gave an iutstand- 
ing performance of floor work. Nice 
work Max — worry 'em a little — they 
like it! 



"Olie" was a little too rough for 
"Doggie Julian" last night. He went 
out via the personal foul route after 
a nice game at forward. He had a 
field goal and foul to his credit. 



Don't forget the game with the Get- 
tysburg Bullets in Lebanon Sat. night. 
They have a nice club and should give 
the boys a good tussle. Let's get the 
ole pep up fer the remainder of the 
games, there are only two more home 
games. Show the ole spirit — that's 
what it takes! We must beat Al- 
bright in Lebanon next Sat. too. Fight 
L. V. C. Fight! 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



While the rest of you people are 
over eating one of Brother Chef's de- 
lightful meals I will go into the 
Muses and write the gleanings of the 
past week. Not much doing in the 
line of news so please excuse the 
dumbness. 

The first thing I want to ask is 
that all contributions handed in to 
this column be typed. I appreciate 
your contribs. but if you don't type 
them I have to and I never was 
known to be overly ambitious. Thank 
you! 



That sure was a great game at 
Reading the other night and the stu- 
dents and faculty are to We greatly 
congratulated the way they responded 
in the way of cheers and encourage- 
ment. Thats the way to do it. There 
is school spirit here but you have to 
dynamite to get it to the surface. Let's 
all turn out and >^hoop-er-up when 
we entertain the Albright squad next 
week. 



I wish to thank the sweet little 
thing who wrote me that cute little 
note! I'm sorry, but right now I am 
well taken care of, but if you will 
but answer a few questions I might, 
put you on a list I have for futurla 
consideration. Please get in: touch 
with me right away as I am anxious 
to know you farther. I never take 
"blind" dates, not even good ones! 



How about that Junior Prom? I 
have been talking it ov*ar with some 
of the men and they are for it. Haven't 
said anything to any girls as I doubt 
if they would be in favor of it. Let's 
hear some comment. Good or bad. 
It shows that you are at least think- 
ing of it. 



I lika KrumbeigePs name. Some 
how it makes me yearn for food. 
Good Dutch food like Kraut, Pon- 
hoss, Pig's knuckles, Cheese, Pretzels 
and Coffee! 



Some one asked me the other day 
how I liked the Delphian play I am 
sorry but I didn't hear much of it. 

This is not due to personal dislike of 
either the talent or the Plot, but therie 
was some kid right behind me chew L 
ing his gum in my ears. He sure had 
a grudge on it. He was the world's 
best. Beats th e co-eds a long way. 



Did you hear of the Scotch kid who 
shot both parents so he could go to 
the Orphans Picnic? 



predicament. Finder please return to 
Ye Editor and receive reward. Men's 
trousers they were! 



I can take a joke with the best of 
them and I seldom get sore when 
anyone puts anything over on nie 
but last night I got my ire up. I told 
Flooky that sh e ought to hear Paul 
Whiteman play "trees" and she pert- 
ly wisecracks, "Well, what does he 
usually play". Elmer the axe! 



As yet I havn't received a name f 0r 
this poor little column and I think it 
is a shame for anything not to even 
have a name. So please help me a- 
long by sending in what you think 
would be a nice title. This is a ple a 
and all plea's are heartrending. 



"Well done thou good and faithful 
seivant, well done." 

O. H. S. 




Major General Smedley D. Butler 
has planned to resign his commis- 
sion next fall to take the lecture plat- 
form. Official Washington has been 
notified of his intention and General 
Butler expects no opposition. He has 
rigned lecture contracts from Octo- 
be, 1931 to May, 1932. 



Statistics issued by the Department 
of Commerce show that enough candy 
was eaten in Pennsylvania in 1929 to 
provide an average of 15.49 pounds 
for every man, woman, and child. The 
general average for the wjhole cuntry 
was 13 pounds. 



Lost: One pair of pants. Good as 
new. Owner in most embarrassing 



Women hold many and varied po- 
sitions in Soviet Russia. There are 
women sea captains; members of the 
Army General Staff. They attend 
military academies, command regi- 
ments and divisions and pilot mili- 
tary airplanes. They go in for en- 
gineering, railroad building, farming, 
work in the metal trades. More than 
3,000,000 are now in industrial plants 
and offices. It has been shown that as 
the number of women at work in- 
creases the number of divorces de- 
creases. 



The business man says it usually 
takes another four years to deflate 
most of the college graduates. 



At Berea College, in. Kentucky, the 
Student gets more for his money than 
at any other institutiin in the U. S. 
The total charge to students, includ- 
ing regisration and books, never ex- 
ceeds $146 for the entire year. Tui- 
tion is thrown in for good measure. 
The student pay 65c a "week" for a 
neatly furnished room, with hot wat- 
er, clean linen, and electricity. Meals 
avarage about 11c apiece. 

Ninety-three percent of its young 
people come from that wooded stretch 
of mountains extending through eight 
Southern States where chane'es for 
more than a grade school education 
in a one-room school are complicated 
by the difficulty of getting over 
rough roads. 



The bulk of what is consumed by 
the college of 250 students is raised 
with the aid of students help. Ten 
hours labor a week is the minimum 
required of each student. Many work 
half a day and thus earn all of their 
expenses. No silk dresses, shirts 
socks or hose are permitted; black or 
brown leather shoes only may ^ e 
worn for school and work and "fr°' 
ery" is decidedly out of place. 

The Board of Trustees of Hartwic* 
Academy, Cooperstown, N. Y. found- 
ed in 1797, has decided that begin- 
ning next September girls will n ° 
longer be admitted. The action was 
taken to make the institution an 
grade private academy. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1931. 



PAGE THREE 




t new a young girl named Babina, 
yffao pl a y on a shrill concertina, 
One day she eloped 
As the neighbors had hoped 
^ n d married a shy street cleaner. 



Husbands are a kind of promissory 
n ote. Orte gets tired of meeting 
them. 



pigskin — Did you open the windows 
wide? 

Seegar — You bet I did! Pulled the 
top half all the way down and pushed 
the bottom half all the way up. 



An optomist is a fellow who lights 
a match before asking Taylor for a 
cigarette. 



"Come across now, where did you 
put them diamonds?" 
"I shoved 'em back, sir." 
"Back where?" 

''Back with the rest of the deck". 



"Did Harold remain cool during the 
battle of Argonne?" 

"Yes, Ha was shivering all the 
time." 



Fatts — 'How long does it take yiu 
to dress in the morning? 

Chet — 'Bout half and hour. 

Fatts — (bragging) — Only takes me 
ten minutes. 

Chet — I wash. 



Prof. — Giv e me an example ex- 
plaining the theory of like attract- 
ing like. 

Stude. — Pop drank some wood alco- 
hal and it went to his head. 



A man's relations with a woman 
will usually assume one of two phases 
—courtship or controversy. Fre- 
quently, so closely interwoven are the 
two, it is quitb impossible to disting- 
uish between them. 



Some girls are like a pair of sixes, 
they're hard to shake. 



Grandmother — I suppose you have 
to stay up very late at college. 

IGrandson — Yes, but really, Grand- 
mother it's worth it. 



Clem — Why do you wear a player's 
m ask on your ankle. 

Babe — I've had it in a cast three 
times. 



(Again used by permission of the 
^thors, Shortledge, McKusker, and 
p revola, Publishers, Inc. 



hav e a sweetheart in every hall, 
eauties and queens, each and all, 
heir love for me is true and deep. 
he y taunt and haunt me in my sleep. 

Cupid gav e arrows to them 
"ith which to choose mb from all 
men. 

,^ las ! alas! All med despair. 

Use I've been chosen by the fair. 
, T — Speg of Garfield. 

!, io be sung to the tune: I Lov% You 
Tr %). 



W'h 

en baseball season comes rolling 
around, 

^tfandsomc Denny faces the mound. 

greps his bat and squints his eye, 
^ Atl <l bats thb ball into the sky. 

h mighty strides he covers the 

ioam, 

alas! Poor Denny was tagged 
at — first! 



* s t Cannibal — Is supper over? 



-cond Cannibal— Yes, everybody's 
at en. 



l s kunk is offensive when it's on 
h * tensive. 




Write a play! ! You can do it! Any- 
one can do it ! Remember, friends, 
that the writer of thesb lines has a- 
chieved his success by following these 
few simple rules: 

1. Take something that people don't 
know anything about. Its safor. 

2. Take your hero from the place 
where men are men and fairies are 
boats. Get a villian who is so black 
that he can used coal for smokeballs. 
Havb your heroine of the cling-peach 
kind. (Not canned). Also have a lov- 
ing mother, a gruff father, etc. These 
are fo r atmosphere. (Hot). 

3. Make it a modern play, the prob- 
lem being to find out what th'a play 
is about. 

4. Have the characters typical Bab- 
bitts — the audience always likes to 
feel that the players are as dumb 
as they ar*ei. 

5. Always have the play end hap- 
pily. If you can't, have a cut back 
to show that they are united in Heav- 
en, if that's where you think they 
went. If not use your own judg- 
ment. 

6. Bring in a talk on religion, pol- 
itics, and sex. Make it very proper, 
but let the audience feel that it's get- 
?ng some real dope. They like it. 

7. At this point burn your play, 
buy a theatrb and produce what you 
please. 



Two's company, three's a crowd- 
in any telephone bioth. 



Little Oscar stood on the window- 
sill and gurgled and cooed, so we 
gave him a gentile push and then 
just laughed and laughed 'cause we 
knew we were on the nineteenth floor. 



A student at Princton cannot make 
an eating club until he has made at 
least three chorus girls. 

It is very hard to tell the difference 
between a street cleaner and a 
Princeton man because they both wear 
beer suits. 

Princeton students quarrel with 
their nurses when young and are born 
with a silver signtat ring on their 
fingers which they later imprint up- 
on the noses of football opponents. 

Woodrow Wilson besides being Pres- 
ident of Princeton at one time was 
also President of the United States. 

Every Princeton student, by virtue 
of going to Princeton, belongs to at 
least one country club. 

One of the requirements for admis- 
sion is a sports roadster that knows 
tbJa road to New York. 

Jake Slagle was always hale and' 
hearty but was saved for the Yale 
and Harvard games. 

Two-thirds if the patrons of New 
York night clubs are Princeton stu- 
dents, and some of them have evtan 
been known to pay their checks. 

One does learn something at Prince- 



PRINTING— 

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Publications, Catalogues, 
Booklets, Etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO' 



Annville 



Penna. 



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REPAIR SHOP 

Service, Workmanship and Materials 
Hand Stitching 

W. D. ELLIOTT, JR. 

140 N. Railroad St., 
ANNVILLE, PA. 




Some of the alumni in and about 
Baltimore spbnt a very pleasant ev- 
ening together at the home of Mrs. 
Edith Lehman Bartlett, '13, on De- 
cember 5. The program took the 
form of a joint session of the liter- 
ary societies. Miss Lottie Spessard 
'13 of the Philippine Islands, was 
present and entertained with vocal 
selections and a discussion of the po- 
litical situation in the Philippines. 

It was decided to have a dinner on 
March 6. This will bb held in Lever- 
ing Hall of the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. All alumni and former stu- 
dents in Baltimore and vicinity, and 
in Washington D. . are invited. Miss 
Lizitte W. Reese, the famous poet 
ess, is to be guest of honor. Miss 
Esta Wareheim '16 of the Johns Hop- 
kins University is president of the 
group and Mrs. N. M. Bonder, '20 is 
secretary-treasurer. 

Mrs. B. L. Hammond '29 is now 
employed in the catalog'ng depart- 
ment of the library cf the Jnhttf 
Hopkins University. She w^.s for- 
merly with the Enock Pratt L brar? 
of Baltimore. 



Among the alumni who were back 
at school for the Delphian annivers- 
ary are the following: 

Miss Mae Reider '26, Miss Ruth 
Cooped '30, Miss Grace Kebner'30, 
Mrs. Alga Freeman Kiehner '28, Mr 
Franklin Kiehner '26, Mrs. Francis 
Long Shroyer '28, Mr. David Shroy- 
er '26, Miss Irene Schell '28, Miss 
Josephine Schell '30, Miss Alojsta 
Schlichter '30, Mr. Ralph Wood '26 
\Mr. Harold Herr '27. Miss Ruth 
Stuilhar '29, Miss Elizabeth Matthes 
'29, Miss Mary Snyder '30, Miss Olive 
Weigel '30, Miss Bernita Strbbig '30, 
Mr. Miles Kiehner '29, Mr. Archie 
Lutz '29, Mr. Fredrick Miller '29, Mr. 
Elwood Myers '30, Mr. Oscar Stan- 
baugh '30, Mr. William Meyers '30 
Mrs. Martha Early Edris '19, Mr. 
Edgar Shroyer '30, Mr. Charles 
Knisely '28, Miss Mildred Lane '29 
Miss Janbt Miller '29, Miss Mildred 
Meyers '30, Miss Mary Rank '30, and 
Mr. Harvey Nitrauer '28. 



GIRYS NOSE OUT 

ALBRIGHT STARS 



(Continued from Page 1) 



bright score. The score stood at the 
end of the game 26-25, Lebanon Val- 
ley ahead. 
Yinlgst was high scoibr for Leba- 



ton, as almost every graduate leaver 
with his golf game much improved. 

Eugene O'Neill went to Princeton 
and learned to swear there. 

There is mo:b liquor consumed on 
the Princeton campus than on any 
other in the country. 

Oh Yeah! 



Dictionaries 



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In English, French, Spanish, Latin, 
German and Italian. 

Funk & Wagnell's College Standard 
Dictionary — 140,000 T»rms 
$5.00 

Funk & Wagnail's The Desk Stand- 
ard Dictionary— 82,000 Terms 
$2.00 

...We also have Roget's Thesarus and 
inany other editions of Ancient and 
Modern Language Dictionaries. 

Bollman's 

BOOKSELLER & STATIONER 
33 South Eighth Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



non Valley while Porter and Kutz 
struck about even for Albright. Rupp 
did some commendable work as guard 
for the Annville team. Hershey for 
Lebanon Valley Colleg'2 played es- 
pecially well in the second half of 
he game. 

Both teams exhibited some neat, 
clean basketball. It was only a ques- 
tion of time which team would be the 
victor. 



Y. W. NOTES 



A Freshman program was present- 
ed at the Y. W. C. A. "Friendly Hour" 
on Sunday evening, in North Hall 
Parlor; it was uniqu'2 in both its ar- 
rangement and presentation, as it 
took the form of a "Friendly Hour 
Special" sent out by the Y. W. C. A. 
Railroad Company. The general en- 



gineer was Kathryn Mowry; th'a con- 
ductor, Gertrude Paul; and the spec- 
ial conductor, Esther Smelser. The 
The train left the station, North Hall 
Parlor, at 5:30 P. M. for all points 
of spiritual interest; th'2 latter in- 
culded the following: 

5:32 P. M.— Praise Station 
5:35 P. M. Bible View 
5:37 P. M.— Power House 
5:39 P. M. Refreshment Depot 
5:43 P. M. — Observation Outlook 
5:50 P. M. — Songville 
5:53 P. M. — Pobtsville 
5:58 P. M. — Music Lane 
6:03 P. M.— Lookout Mt. 
6:05 P. M. — Parting Signal 
6:06 P. M.— Change Car for Church 
Service. 

As a whole the program was in- 
teresting and varied; it was also 
something out-of-the-ordinary, as it 
was unusual in form and arrange- 
ment. 




J. EDWAR GANTZ, formerly 
of Harpel's 

wishes to announce the opening of his new studio at 781 CUM- 
BERLAND ST. LEBANON, PA. That the STUDENTS of 
LEBANON VALLEY COLEGE may become acquainted with 
the NEW STUDIO and LOCATION, MR. GANTZ will have 
the following SPECIAL FOR STUDENTS ONLY. 

1 Large Portrait 8x10 
$1.00 each 



dozen Agency Photo- 
graphs, special finish 
$1.50 



This inducement expires March 
31st, 1931 

PHONE 1447 



TOURIST BELL PHONE 

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YE COZY INN, H. C. COFFROATH, Prop. 
Wm. Penn Highway, 4 Miles West of Lebanon, Pa. 
We Cater To Private Parties and Banquets 
Special Dinners and A La Carte Service 
Ample Parking Space We Serve With a Smile 




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MUSICAL GOODS VICTOR RECORDS 

VICTOR RADIOS 

Miller's Music Store 



738 Cumberland Street, 



Lebanon, Pa. 



Page four 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1931. 



BUCKETEERS SINK 

F. & M. AND P. M. C. 



(Continued from Page 1) 



ially in the first half and F. & M. did 
not put up the opposition that had 
been expected. This was partly due 
to the absence of Glenn Horst from 
the visitor's lineup. 

L. V. opened the game cautionsly 
'and nearly ten minutes had elapsed 
before they put in their first field 
goal. In the meantime however they 
had sunk five out of seven foul at- 
tempts. Passell boosted F. & M.'s 
score with some pretty long shots. 
After a time out the lacol team began 
sinking buckets, Stewart leading the 
way with long shots. Th>3 score at 
half time was 21-11 favor Lebanon 
Valley. 

When the second half opened the 
home quintette gave an exhibition of 
how short a time is necessary to 
scorb ten points. Five field goals 
rained through the basket before the 
visitors got their bearings. With a 
safe lead Lebanon Valley again 
played more easily for the remaind- 
er of the game. 

Stewart was again "on" in his shot? 
jinking seven field and two foul goals 
for sixteen points. Heller was nex? 
in scoring with thirteen counters t<r 
vjhis cridit. Passel was the outstand- 
ing performer for F. & M., his lonr 
shots always being dangerous. 

Saturday night Gettysburg is the 
opponent on the Lebanon H. S. floor 
Gettysburg has a good basketball club 
and a hard fight should result. 
Lebanon Valluy 

G F P 
Stewart F. 10 1 21 

Morrison F. 10 2 

Heller C. 3 4 10 

S. Light G. 10 2 

M. Light G. 10 2 

Frey G. 

Orsino G. 

16 5 37 

P. M. C. 

g . f r 

Miller F. 12 4 

Britten F. 3 3 

Layar F. 10 2 

Brennan C. 13 5 

Kook G. 3 3 9 

Finch G. 10 2 
7 11 25 

Referee :Batzel 

Lebanon Valley 

G ,7 F 

Stewart F. 7 2 16 

Morrison F. 13 

Orsino F. 10 2 

Sprenkle F. 

Reeder F. 

D-athem F. 

Heller C. 5 3 13 

S, Light G. 10 2 

M,. Light G. 113 

Frey G. 

15 7 37 

Franklin & Marshall 

G ;7 P 

Brubake P. 2 15 

Cole F. 

Friedenberg F. 113 

Hershey F. 

Killian C. 13 

Snyder C. 11 

Staton G. 12 4 

Herbine G. 

Passell G. F. 3 2 8 
7 8 22 

Referete — Julian 



LUCK DESERTS 

LOCAL TEAM 



(Continued from Page 1) 



attempts. 

Stewart and Heller were high 
scorers with ten and nine points re- 
spectively. 

Lebanon Valley's quintette ran up 
against hard luck at Reading last 
Thursday night and for the second 
time within a week-lost a game by 
a one point margin. After firty min- 
utes of nip and tuck playing, Albright 
came out ahead 37-36. 

Despite the defeat it was a gtfaat 
night for Lebanon Valley. Two hun- 
dred students followed the girl's and 
boy's teams to Reading and were 
treated to two of the best games 
played this year. The Reading Y. 
M. C. A. gymnasium looked as if Leb- 
anon Valley were the home team as 
half of the crowd was composed of 
Blub and White followers. 

The end of the game the most 
exciting seen for a long time. Twice 
the lead changed in the final min- 
utes of play. First Morrison put in 
a goal to give L. V. a onla point lead 
but three seconds before the end of 
the game, Karlip put Albright ahead. 
The time left was too short for Leb- 
anon Valley to tia up the score. 

Throughout the entire forty min- 
utes of play it was anyone's game. 
The lead see-sawed back and forth 
never being over six points for either 
time. It so happened that when the 
end came Albright was ahead. 

Stewart was again high scorer, a- 
massing a total of thirteen points 
bafore he left the game on fouls. 



Haines was the leader for Albright 
with eleven points to his credit. 

Lebanon Valley 

G F P 

Stewart F. 4 2 10 

Orsino F . 

Morrison F. 10 2 

Sprinkle F. 

Heller C. 3 3 9 

S. Light G. 

F. Light G. 10 2 

Frey G. 10 2 

Wogan G. 

10 5 25 

Muhlenberg 





G 


F 


p 


Wackernagle F. 


2 


4 


8 


Nixon F. 











O'brien ;F. 


3 





6 


Land C. 





2 


2 


Carney G. 


1 


3 


5 


Novak G. 











Judt G. 


1 


3 


5 


Horine G. 


2 





4 




9 


12 


30 


Referee: Witmer. 








Lebanon 


Valley 








G 


F 


P 


Stefwtort F. 


4 


5 


13 


Sprenkle (F. 











Morrison F. 


3 





6 


lOrsino F. G. 











Heller C. 


3 


4 


10 


S. Light G. 


1 


1 


3 


Frey G. 











M. Light G. 


2 





4 




13 


10 


36 



A -l SKIL, 
WORKS WONDERS 




H. GOODMAN SONS 

29 W. Sheridan Ave. 

Real Refreshments in a 
Real Way 
Ice Cream, Cakes and Pies 



ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 

207 W. Main 



Grimm s Book Store 

Try us for your needs 
RINGS 

SOCIETY PINS set with 
Pearls 

SHAEFFER FOUNTAIN 

PENS AND PENCILS 
DESK SETS 
BOOK ENDS 

DIE STAMPED STATION- 
ERY with College or Soc- 
iety Seals 



Albright 



LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 

Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



RECITAL ATTRACTS 

MUSIC LOVERS 



(Continued from Page 1) 



fine diction, clarity and tonal beauty. 
The program was then brought to a 
close by the rendering of two piano 
selections, "Nocturne in B Major" by 
3hapin, nd Impromptu in C shart 
Minar" by Reinhold, by Cathrine 
Heckman, who played with accuracy 
and good tonb, giving obvious enjoy- 
ment to a good-sized audience. 



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Rose Singer Shou 

761 Cumberlad Street, Lebanon, Pa. 





G 


F 


P 


Karlip F. 


3 


1 


7 


De Franco F. 


3 


3 


9 


Horn F. 











Haines C. 


3 


5 


11 


Smythe C. 











Vickery G. 


1 


3 


5 


Olisliso G. 


2 





4 


Kern G. 





1 


1 




12 


13 


37 



Referee :Boyer 



The succbss of the production i s 
<Lue to the untiring efforts of ]ytj Sg 
Mary K. Wallace. Credit is also du e 
to the following committee chair, 
man: Play, Caroline Fisher; Program 
Dorothy Hafer; Property, Elizabeth 
Engle; Invitation, Kathryn Yingst- 
Seating, Effie Le Van; Decoration 
Mary Buffington; Costume, Eva Peck- 
Refreshment, Elizabeth Ulrich; Mus- 
ic, Mary K. oshert. 



DELPHIAN OBSERVES 

NINTH ANNIVERSARY 



(Continued from Page 1) 



rich, as Gentleman Susan, and Viola 
Williams, as Alice the servant. 

After the play in Engle Conserva- 
tory, faculty, friends and students en- 
joyed the remainder of the Evening 
in the Alumni gymnasium, which was 
artistically decorated with Delphian's 
colors, crimson and gold. Music was 
furnished by Art Zeller's Orchestra. 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



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HOFFMAN STEAM PRESSING 
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STEVE WORNAS 

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Wm. Penn Highway 
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757-759 Cumberland Strett 

Special Rate on Portraits to Students 



LET'S BEAT 
ALBRIGHT! 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



WE CAN BEAT 
ALBRIGHT 



VOLUME VIII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSY LVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 5. 1931. 



No. 1 



JUNIATA EVENS 
SCORES WITH L. V. 

GIRLS PLAY SLOW GAME 
AT HUNTINGDON 
FRIDAY 



Determined to avenge the defeat 
which they suffered at the hands of 
Lebanon Valley several we'eks ago, 
Juniata succeeded in winning a five- 
point victory over the Annville sex- 
tette, Friday afternoon, February 27 
at Huntingdon by the score of 17-12. 

Both teams had a difficult time 
in getting started as is evident by 
the score at the end of the first quar- 
ter, 2-2. However Juniata was not 
long in makinf twelve points against 
the four points which Lebanon Val- 
ley had at the end of the half. 

In the second half of the game the 
Annvile lassies made a decided spurt, 
scoring eight points in the time but 
they were unable to overcome the 
lead of the Huntingdon team. The 
score at the final blow of the whistle 
stood 17-12 favoring Juniata. 

The game was rather short on 
goals for both teams. The ball was 
continually in play but the forwards) 
seemed to be unable to make their 
"shots" good. Rupp played the best 
game for Lebanon Valley while Sell, 
forward of Juniata exhibited some 
neat work. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



JUNIORS AGAIN 

ENTERTAINED 



The girls of the Junior Class were 
entertained at tea on Tuesday after- 
noon, from 3:30 to 5:00 o'clock by 
Mrs. George D. Gossard. A delight- 
ful program was furnished by mem- 
bers of their cousin class. Christine 
Grubar gave a violin solo, accom- 
panied by Dorothy Ely. Evangeline 
Saloris entertained with two tap dan- 
ces, accompanied on the piano by 
Gem Gemmel. There was also a pi- 
ano selection by Dorothy Ely and a 
very entertaining reading was given 
hy Kathryn Mowry. The Misses Mar- 
jorie Miller and Mary Gossard 
poured. A pleasant afternoon was 
enjoyed by everyone. 



L. V. C. AFRICA DRIVE 

PLANNED BY "Ys" 



The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 
h^d a joint meeting on Sunday even- 
ts, at 5:45 o'clock, in Engle Con- 
servatory. The theme about Which 
the program centered was that of 
Sei> vice, and of the relation of stu- 
nts of L. V. C. with students of 
ot her lands. The meeting was pre- 
paratory to the Foreign Project drive 
Hich is being held this week. 

The service was opiened by Effie 
Le Van with an organ prelude, "Re- 
^ er e", by Clarence Deckinson. Harry 
^ ec k led in devotions, reading for 
scripture Hesson I Corinthians 13. 
Kathryn Lutz and Mildred Christan-* 
Sen > accompanied by Ruth Coble, 
a duet, "Whispering Hope". 
. re d Mund presented, in a challeng- 
es way the duty and priveledge of 
faring w ith others. The challenge 

as repeated by Marie Gelwick, who, 
acc ompanied by Margaret Lahn gave 
(Continued on Page 4) 



JUNIOR TEA 



HUGE SUCCESS 



The Junior girls were entertained 
at a tea by the Y. W. C. A. last 
Thursday afternoon, February 26, 
from 3:30 to 5:00 in North Hall Par- 
lor. The duties of hostess were de- 
lightfully carried out by Miss Naomi 
Shively ,a Junior members of the Y. 
W. Cabinet. Practically all the Jun- 
ior girls were present, a fact which 
atested to the popularity of affairs 
of this type. The chief diversions 
were "500" and bridge, and later 
dancing. Delicious refreshments of 
tea, chocolate, and sandwiches were 
served by the members of the Y. W. 
cabinet, while Miss Sarah Ensminger, 
president of the cabinet, and Ma- 
dame Green poured. Radio music 
provided additional entertainment 
during the afternoon, and when the 
girls finally dispersed, they all de- 
clared it a most successful affair. 



SOPH QUINTETTE 
BEATS FROSH 



FROSH AHEAD AT END 
OF THE FIRST 
PERIOD 



Scores werb evened in the tradi- 
tional rivalry of the underclassmen 
when the sophomores squeezed out 
a hard fought victory over the Frosh 
last Thursday evening in the Alumni 
Gym. The 21-17 score shows the 
air-tight ball played by both teams. 

The /Frosh guns got going early 
in the fray with Brubaker sinking 
them with great accuracy. His team 
mates held the Sophs in check and 
the half-time score showed the 
"Plebes" in the van, 10-4. In the 
second half it was a different story. 
The Frosh had practically gone their 
limit. The Sophs with Saylor and 
Speg leading the attack soon caught 
up to thia Frosh. However, the tie 
was short lived when Captain Bow- 
ers dropped in two from the side of 
•the court. The time was now get- 
ting short and the trailing second 
year men launched their greatest of- 
fensive spurt which was the most 
exciting point of the game. Clements, 
Soph forward, practically demoro- 
lized the Frosh by sinking two sen- 
sational shots from the center of the 
court. With but 50 seconds to play 
Speg put the game on ice with a 
double decker from under the basket 
after a classy exhibition of pass 
work on the part of the Sophs. 

Brubaker led the Frosh in scoring 
and Clements, Saylor and Speg were 
the main cog in the Soph scoring. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



GLEE CLUB AND 

ORCHESTRA ACTIVE 



On Tuesday evening, March 3rd, 
Prof. Crawford and the Men's Glee 
Club journied to Ephrata. The con- 
cert was a great success and the boys 
were recalled repeatedly for encores. 
Get an earful of one of their concerts 
if you want something that is really 
high class entertainment. 

The orchestra under the direction 
of Mr. Walsh is steadily forging a- 
head. It is not too late fpr anyone 
wishing to join to do so. Rehearsals 
are held every Tuesday evening in 
the chapel. 



PIONEERS SEEN 
jN CHAPEL 

JUNIORS PRESENT SKIT 
TO AID QUITTIE 
SALES 



On Tuesday, March 3, our chapel 
program was enlivened by the pre- 
sentation of a shoit sk^t, "pion- 
eers", written by Eva Peck and 
actbd by members of the 1931 Quit- 
tapahilla staff. Th e purpose of this 
skit was to stimulate sates and co- 
operation in regard to the Junioi 
class annual production. 

After a few introductory remarks 
were made by Dr. Wagner and by 
George Nye, editor-in-chief of 'the 
"Quittie", the curtain opened on a 
wild and wolly prairie scene. There 
hove into sight a vehicle drawn by 
no less a team than "Brute" Raw- 
houser and "Shorty" Early. On the 
seat of the wagon were Roy Lech- 
thaler and "Kit" Yrngst. These four 
pioneers discussed the various diffi- 
culties attendant upon their situa- 
tion, and were then joined by two 
Indians. The Indians, acted by 
Gladys Hershey and I7red Mund 
grunted in appi-oval aboriginal fash- 
ion, and finally showed their spirit 
of cooperation by lending a hand in 
thb pulling of the wagon. 

The curtain fell on the exodus of 
the covered wagon, and after Dr. 
Wagner had made a few pertinent 
remarks, there was a general feeling 
that each person should help the 
"Quittie" pioneers along by sub- 
scribing for the annual. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Thursday, March 5— Y. W. C. 
A. Sophomore tea 3:30 P. 
M. Sophomore and Junior 
Basket Ball game 6:15 P. 
M. 

Friday, March 6— Men's Glee 
Club — York Havbn, Men's 
Debate L. V. vs. Waynes- 
burg College, at home. Del- 
phian, Clionian, Philokos- 
mian Literary society meet- 
ings. Kalozetean house- 
warming. 

Saturday, March 7 — Girl's Bas- 
ket Ball game with Al- 
bright at Lebanon. Men's 
Basket Ball game with Al- 
bright at Lebanon. 

Sunday, March 8— Y. W. C. A. 
{Friendly Hour 5:45 P. M. 
North Hall Parlor. 

Monday, March 9 — Basket Ball 
Delphian vs. Clionian. 

Tuesday, March 10 — Mrs. Gos- 
sard's tea to the Sopho- 
more girls. 

Wednesday, March 11 — Debate 
— Susquehanna University 
vs. L. V. (men). Student 
Prayermeeting 6:15 P. M. 
Election— Y. W. C. A. 4:30 
P. M. 

Thursday March 12 — Debate at 
Etyzabethtown Ctfllenge — > 
Men's team. 



HISTORY CLUB MEETS 
GIVES VARIED PROGRAM 



In its bi-monthly meeting, the His- 
tory Club presented a very enlight- 
ening program, Wednesday evening, 
March 4th, 1931 in Philo Hall. 

Joe Wood, as president of the or- 
ganization presided. Harry Snavely 
gave a most interesting account of 
the past days of Lebanon Valley as 
told to him by his grandfather. His 
talk threw some interesting side- 
ights on the surrounding country. 
Eva Peck presented a life-likb pic- 
ture of Hitler, Germany's Mussolini, 
in a short but inspiring talk. Martha 
Xr^ider showed the pitiful conditions 
and ordeals of the people who live 
along the Rhine. Her remarks par- 
ticularly brought to our attention the 
conditions which exist in our own 
country. Going back into history, 
Robert MeCusker talked for several 
minutes on the "Origin of the Papa- 
cy". Following the speakers of the 
evening, the ardent History students 
discussed various phases of current 
history. 



DEBATERS LOSE 
BOTH CONTESTS 



ADVERSE CONDITIONS 
CAUSE DEFEAT 
OF TEAM 



Under a very great handicap re- 
sulting from an unusual circum- 
stance the negative team of L. V. C. 
was troundad by the negative team 
of Western Maryland College on 
Thursday evening, February 26, in 
Philo Hall. 

Our own Professor Gingrich pre- 
sided over the meeting, and before a 
large and expected audience he very 
ably and eloquently presented the 
question for debate, namely, "Re r 
solved, that the nations adopt free 
trade." However, to the surprise and 
consternation of all, upon calling on 
one side then the other to uphold the 
affimative, it was found that both 
the teams were ready to debate the 
negative side only. Then after! a 
consultation it was found that prac- 
tically the same situation obtained 
for the teams debating at the same 
time at Western Maryland College. 

The day was saved by the gracious 
offer of our own team to stand on 
the affirmative side. After ten min- 
utes of preparation, the debate was 
started, and although odds were 
great against the affimative, the Leb- 
anon Valley team made a very cred- 
ible showing. The value of material 
was higher for the negative, and the 
presentation thereof was also better. 
Of course the situation explains this 
fact. However, in the rebuttals, where 
originality and force is especially 
needed, the Lebanon Valley team was 
exceptional. Herein Etter toste to 
the fore, and with very emphatac 
refutations he not only disconcerted 
his opponents but also kept the au- 
dience in a stafe of sympathetic in- 
terest. The judges saw fit to vote 
unanimously in favor of the Wes- 
tern Maryland team. This decision 
could have been prophecied in ad- 
vance dub to the limiting factors, but 
our boys gained a moral victory by 
(Continued on Page 4) 



PASSERS SWAMP 
G-BURG FIVE 



STEWART AND HELLER 
AMASS 36 POINTS 
IN GAME 



The Blue and White won another 
game Saturday night in the Lebanon 
High gymnasium from the fast Get- 
tysburg aggregation by displaying a 
clever brand of basketball. The game 
was coloress in spots but once the 
boys Bad by Captain Heller warmed 
up it was worth watching. 

Thla bullets drew first blood when 
Citz dropped in a foul shot while 
the game was only one minute old, 
but this lead did not last long. Ste- 
wart showed little signs of being up 
to his average gamb at first but man- 
aged to drop in a field goal to put 
L. V. ahead. Then the fireworks start- 
ed. Heller dropped in a field goal 
and one foul to increase the lead be- 
fore Captain Anglemoyer slowed up 
the combination by continually tak- 
ing the ball from our "butter fin- 
gered" forwards. For a time it looked 
as though it was going to be just 
another rugged basketball game with 
poor passing and poorer shooting 
playing the major roles. Stewart 
gradually overcame his weakness 
and sank several spectular; shots) 
stretching our lead considerably. 
Buohle the lanky center for the Bul- 
lets forced Cal Heller to foul him 
three times in quick order and Shrom 
was sent in at center. The pride and 
joy of Epharta drew a round of ap- 
plause from the spectators as he 
sank two field goals and a foul be- 
fore the half ended with Lebanon 
Valley leading 21-11. 

The second half was all Lebanon 
Valley. Stewart was "on" by this 
time for good and evlary time he shot 
it meant two points. Cal managed 
to sink three field goals and four 
fouls before he went out on person- 
als. Anglemoyer and his team mates 
(Continued on Page 4) 



MODERN DRAMA 
FEATURES READERS CLUB 



The Reader's Club held its Regular 
meeting at the home of Doctor Wal- 
lace on Tuesday evening, March 3, 
Modern drama was the theme for the 
discussion. A recently revised play 
of Barrie's "What Every Woman 
Knows," was capalbly discussed by 
Sarah Ensminger. This is a humor- 
ous play which has been a great suc- 
cess as a stage production. Percy 
Clements ably brought out the high 
spots of Shaw's "Major Barbara". 
Conflicting standards of life between 
father and daughter form the cen- 
tral motivating force of the play 
Betty Lefevre presented very clearly 
the story of "Dover Road" by A. A. 
Milne. It is a satire on romantic di- 
vorce. "The Barretts of Wimple 
Street" by Ralph Baily was present- 
ed by Viola Williams. This is an 
historical epic, rather devoid of ac- 
tion, in which the life of Robert and 
Elizabeth Browning is depected. Rob- 
ert Eshleman read an excellent crit- 
icism on Anderson's play "Elizabeth, 
the Queen." After a general discus- 
sion on the plays and on actors, the 
meeting was brought to a close. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



1 weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

KDITOKIAL STAFF 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 Editor-in-Chief 

Fred Mund, '32 Associate Editor 

Hilda D. Buckley, '32. .Associate Editor 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Associate Editor 

Walter Krumbiegel, '33, 

Managing Editor 



HFI'OIITOKIAL. STAFF 

Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32 

Elizabeth Ulrick, '32 

Edward Shellenberger, '33 

Edmund Umberger, '34..Gen'l Reporter 

George Snowhili, '34 Conservatory 

Percy Clements, '33 Athletics 

Jane Muth, '33 Clionian 

Arline Heckrote, '33 Delphian 

Clarence Earley, '33 Kalozetean 

Chester Goodman, '33 Philokosmian 

Gloria Eavanture, '33.. Alumni Reporter 



per. Remember by boosting the La 
Vie you are boosting your school. If 
we have any valuable suggestion for 
the good of the papers, let's not 
keep them to ourselves; pass them 
on to the staff. If they deserve any 
consideration, they will get it ; if not, 
y't is easy to dicord them. 

So come on, students, give your 
best to the staff. Your support and 
cooperation gives the members en- 
couragement. Let's try to be broad- 
er in our views and stop this contin- 
ual "razzing", which after all, is not 
going to help the agitator. 

Cooperation is what we need. Are 
we going to get it? 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THU RSDAY, MARCH 5- 1931. 

PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Robert Rawhouser, '32, 

Business Manager 

Herman Mariano, '33, 

Ass't Business Manager 
Paul Kleinfelter, '32, 

Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 



[WHY NOT A 

DRAMATIC CLUB? 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under tne 
Act of March 3, 187a. 



COOPERATION 



"Razzing" seems to be very pop- 
ular on our campus. Why it is, we 
do not know but thta condition exists 
Persons who are very busy, try 
frantically to find some time in which 
to engage in this pleasant pastime; 
those who have nothing to do exalt 
in the so-called criticism. Why is it 
that one who has no grounds on 
which to speak always has something 
detrimental to say about the other 
fellow? And it is usually the per 
son who is really trying to carry on 
the work of the school who gets the 
"razzing". No matter what the said 
person does, it is wrong; no matter 
haw he does it, it is not the right 
way. Peculiar, is it not, that the per 
son who never does anything, who 
really cannot do anything is always 
the one who condemns what his fel- 
ilow-meighibor is honestly trying to 
do. 

Take for instance this school pa- 
per, "La Vie CollegierJe." There is a 
certain element in the college which 
takes keen delight in "riding" the 
weekly. It is poorly written, nothing- 
interesting in it, only a joke — so they 
think and do not mind spreading 
such propaganda. 

The truth of the matter is, the 
paper does not get enough coopera- 
tion. Everyone is willing to criti- 
cise it destructively but no one will 
venture his opinions on any construc- 
tive basis. The new La Vie staff 
is now operating. The members are 
starting the year with many deter- 
minations and goals but adverse crit- 
icism is a hugh force it kills spirit 
in a very short time. Are they go- 
ing to get the support they need or 
are the loyal followers of L. V. C. 
going to take the same road as for- 
merly and "razz" thle staff and its 
work. Before we can deride the at- 
tempt of others, we should be able 
to do better than the one whom we 
arte condemning. Ajte we able to 
do that? Can we honestly convince 
ourselves that the editing of a paper 
is a "snap" and that anyone could do 
it better than the present managers. 
Or will we realize that it is not all 
as simple as it seems and that it 
does require effort and "stick-to- 
itiveness" Can't we be bigger and 
better men and wom>en and not try 
to reduce every effort of the staff to 
its least value. We can all make 
it a better paper but not by "razz- 
ing". Cooperaion is what w*e need. 

It is so much easier to sit down 
and comment in a detrimental way 
about this or that which is done but 
let's not be so lazy. Boost your pa 



Since the institution of the Liter- 
ary Societies on our campus, it has 
been a custom for each society to pre- 
sent a play at its anniversary. This 
has survived to the present day. In 
its time it was a good policy because 
the membership of the college was 
much smaller than it is at present, 
making it impossible for the school 
to have a great number of clubs. 
However times havie changed. An- 
niversary plays have become obso- 
lete; they no longer hold the place 
they once did. Alumni return to the 
campus to renew old acquaintances, 
to meet newcomers, to come in con- 
tact again with the student body. 
With what are they usually greeted 
— with a play that usually takes at 
least three hours to be presented. The 
audience becomes bored as the hours 
drag; the seats which were thought 
to be comfortable when the show be- 
gan have become unbearable*. 'No 
matter how excellent the production, 
the play becomes tiresome. The an- 
ticipation of the fun which is going 
i,o follow in the gymnasium, over 
shadows the interest one might have 
had in the play. He wants to move 
around, to have more of a "get-to- 
gether" meeting than in setting for 
a period of several hours in the chap- 
el. 

Why not strike out the play idea 
then, in the anniversary programs? 
Four Society plays, together with 
the Junior and Senior class plays 
are almost to much in one year. But 
if a certain membership in school 
delights in being "Ethel Barrymore's" 
or "Robert Mantell's" why not or- 
anize a Dramatic Club? We have 
a History Club for those interested 
in History, a Chemestry Club for 
the chemists, a Reader's Club for the 
literary addicts, etc. This is the era 
of speeilization. Organize a Dramat- 
ic Club for the express purpose of 
producing good plays. Only those 
who really take a great inteiest in 
acting or those who would like to 
unearth some hidden talent in them- 
selves would be the members. In this 
way wl3 would have a concentrated 
body, working as a unit, toward one 
end, with one purpose — that of put- 
ting on stage productions. As it is 
there are only a certain few who par- 
ticipate in the anniversary programs. 
Let those few be thle Charter mem- 
bers of this new club. Remember we 
must progress. 



when Gloria as Doctor Quack entered 
and by means of her special medicine 
made both of them happy. 

Elizabeth Ulrich evoked much 
laughter by her monologue "Bore- 
dom", in which she set forth in a 
highly entertaining manner the tri- 
vial happenings which make up an 
ordinary Monday, from early morn- 
ing until night. 

The program was ended with sev- 
eral jazz tunes played by Gem Gem- 
mell. 

Hilda Buckley as chritic expressed 
the sentiments of all present by 
saying that those impromptu num- 
bers, displaying the originality and 
talent of those participating in them, 
were very successful. 

A short business meeting followed 
the program, after which the meet- 
ing was adjourned. 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



Kalozejtean Literary Society held 
its weekly meeting Friday Feb. 27. 
It was the first meeting that has been 
held in the newly decorated hall. The 
meeting room has undergone several 
changes since the lastmeeting. The 
walls and ceiling have been repainted 
in a light color and the curtains and 
rugs have been cleanled. The hall 
has taken on a new appearance and 
it is a pleasure to attend the meet- 
ings. A rousing cheer was given to 
Mr. Charles Saleck and his assistants 
for their untiring efforts to remodel 
the hall. 

The meeting was called to order 
by President Becker, a very clever 
program followed. Mr. Russell Mor- 
gan gave a short talk on "New Kalo 
Spirit in a New Kalo Hall". Thia 
was then followed by a debate be- 
tween "Bob" McCusker and Walter 
Krumtteigle entitled "Scotland ^ 
Germany." "Bob" put up some rather 
tight arguments while Krumbeigle's 
were some what foamy. George Beck- 
er and George Snowhili played a few 
popular selections on the banjo and 
the flute. After the program Pres. 
ident Becker turned the meeting over 
into an open discussion business meet- 
ing. Plans for the Anniversary were 
discussed, and every possible sug- 
gestion was taken into consideration 
in order to make the coming Kalo 
Anniversary one of the high social 
lights of the campus. It is firmly 
believed that this year, Kalo will do 
(its utmost in order to present Leb- 
anon Valley with a worth while pro- 
gram. The play committee has not 
definitly decided what Dramatic pre- 
sentation will be given. Several plays 
are in consideration namely — "R. U. 
R" "Bird- In Hand" and "Androcles 
and th)e Lion". 



The regular session of the Philo- 
kosmian Literary Society was called 
to order by President Barr. Harry 
Zech led in the devotions, using 
"Wise Speech" as his theme. 

Charles Kraybill opened the liter- 
ary program with a talk on the 
question of fraternities. He set forth 
the advantages and disadvantages of 
fraternities in an able manner, giv- 
ing illustration from his own exper- 
ience. 

The feature of the meeting was a 
debate on the subject: "Resolved 
that the old time round-up should 
come back to L. V. C." Edward Shel- 
lenbterger and Paul Emenhiser, two 
of Lebanon Valley's temporary ex- 
iles, upheld the affirmative, while 
Fred Mund and Dwight Grove, anti- 
agitators, defended the present sit- 
uation. The judges were Charles 
Kraybill, Carl Myers, and Jack Beat- 
ty, a visiting alumnus. The affir- 
mative side received a unanimous de- 
cision. All the speeches were well 
prepared and filled with wit. 

;Several of the members were called 
upon for extemporaneous talks. Joe 
Rhen gave the characteristics of 
"The Ideal Girl" in his estimation 
Mitchell Jordan commented on the 
quotation, "Truth is Beauty." Robert 
Rawhouser proved that "Actions 
Speak Louder than Words." The 
last subject, "To Make a Sweet Lady 
Sad is a Sour Offence," was very 
well handled by Carl Myers. All the 
speakers proved their ability and 
quickness of thought, and their dis- 
ccurses were received with much en- 
joyment. 

Mr. Beatty closed the program 
with a few remarks, after which the 
meeting adjourned. 

The Philo ping-pong tournament 
is fast coming to a head. Behney 
is the favored contestant for the 
mythical olive wreath, he having al- 
ready reached the finals. Either 
Rawhouser, Keene, or Watkns will 
will be his opponent. The winner will 
probably be decided this week. 



goals and 9 fouls for a total of 47 
points that hurt but its true. 



The highest score we've made so 
far this season came early in the 
year when Stewart and Heller were 

on" down at Collegeville. We had 
20 field goals and 7 fouls for a total 
of 47 points against Ursinus. 



The dear lads from Selinsgrove 
found the basket the least number 
of times on their home floor to grasp 
£he "boobie prize" in the scoring a- 
gainst our changeable five. They 
scored 3 field goals and 8 fouls for 
a grand total of 14 points. That's 
bad fellows. I'll bet they had a nice 
practide the next day. 



In the 14 games played thus far 
L. V. tossers have averaged 34 points 
per game while opponents have only 
been able to average 29.5 Sounds 
good — that's why it's herd. , 



The Sophs "paddled" the Frosh in 
the gym last Thurs. night by a mar- 
gin of 4 points. Fouls were numer- 
ous and hip movements very popular. 
Let's all go out for football next 
year and be in real shape for the 
class basketball games. Maybe the 
stiff-arm will be permitted next year. 
Bill Brown hopes so — Atta boy Bill! 



We have two more games to play 
— let's go after 'em boys and bring 
home the bacon. Bucknell has a nice 
team and wle'll run into plenty of 
trouble at Lewisburg. The best way 
to stop a Thundering Herd is to 
"buffalo 'em". Let's do it! 




KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



At the regular meeting of the Del- 
phian Litierary Society on Friday, 
February 27th, a very delightful im- 
promptu program was given. The 
chaplain, Marie Gelwicks, conducted 
an inspiring devotional service. 

Leona Allen, one of the popular 
campus musicians, was called upon 
for a vocal solo. She sang "Time 
will Tell" in her own inimitable man- 
ner. 

Margaret Lehn, Henretta Wagner, 
and Gloria La Venture greatly a- 
mused the society with a short hu- 
morous skit, " Doctor Quack". "Peg" 
as Miss Lean, and Henrietta as Miss 
Fat were lamenting about their size 



Many people have been inquiring 
as to the standing of the individuals 
on the team in point scoring — the fol- 
lowing list is complete to date ac- 
cording to the manager's score book. 



The regular meeting of Clionian 
Literary Society was called to order 
by the president, Alma Binner, Feb- 
ruary 27th, 1931. After a short bus- 
iness session the meeting was turned 
over to the sophomore girls 

The setting of the program was 
in a tavtern of which Mae Fauth, as 
Jasper, was proprietor. Miss Kath- 
ryn Lutz, a guest from the citz, sang 
"Lilies from Lorraine". Miss Licille 
Engle recited, "Down to old Aunt 
Mary's." Next Miss Helen Eddy 
danced a jig and sang "Kutchy Koo" 
a song quite fitting for the occasion. 
The latest news was expounded at 
greatlength by Kathryn Gockley. A 
tin pan orchestra then favored the 
audience with "Turkey in the Straw." 
A skit called "The Vegetable Fam- 
ily" was given; the cast consisted 
of Marion Mae as the heroine, Mir- 
iam Owen as the hero, Kathryn Lei- 
sey as the villian and Miriam Mil- 
ler as the heroine's father. After the 
skit the neighbors departed singing 
"Darling Nellie Gray." The critic 
was high in her praises of the clever 
performing of the second year girls. 





G 


F 


P 


Stewart 


74 


34 


178 


Heller 


59 


44 . 


162 


S. Light 


10 


12 


32 


Morrison 


10 


5 


25 


M. Light 


8 


4 


20 


Frey 


7 


2 


16 


Sprenkle 


4 


7 


15 


Orsino 


6 j 


1 


13 


Shroni 


3 


1 


7 


Williams 


1 


1 


3 


Reeder 


1 





2 


Fernsler 


1 





2 


Wogan 











H. Light 











Letham 













184 


107 


475 



The big game of the season is Sat. 
night in the High School gym at 
Lebanon. If we are ever going to 
show school spirit let's do it then.. 
We must beet the "cocky" boy from 
Reading. Lets cheer the team and 
they'll do their part. 100% to Leb- 
anon. We'll beat 'em fair and square 
and the town's ours! (But don't try 
to carry any particular part of it a- 
way with you.) 



Lebanon Valley thus far has chalk- 
ed up a total score of 475 point s 
while our opponents were only able 
to counter 413. Looks quite a bit 
different than the football dope — eh 
what? The big boys are not always 
the ones that know how to play bas- 
ketball. We "took it on the chin" 
while we were luggin' the pigskin 
but notice how we drop 'em in the 
hoop game. 



The worst score chalked up against 
us this year was at the hands of the 



Dr. O. E. Reynolds, head of the 
Department of Education, returned 
to the campus on Sunday, after hav- 
ing spent a week at Detroit Mich., 
where he represented the college at 
the Spring Session of the National 
Educational Association and other 
allied Educational groups. 

On Tuesday, he read before the 
National Society of College Teachers 
of Education a paper on the Penn- 
sylvania Situdy of the Relation oi 
Secondary and Higher Education. 

The convention was characterized 
by a large attendance and by specif 
interest in certain types of educa- 
tion. 



The condition of Mr. Albert Barn- 
hart, chairman of the Finance CflJ*" 
mittee is reported as improving aJ " 
the the operation which he under 
went while a patient at the G°o 
Smaraitan Hospital in Lebanon. ii 
returned to his home in Annville 
Friday afternoon. 



Mrs. Bender and Miss GilleS C 
motored to Harrisburg on r ^ xieS .^\ 
evening when they attended a r^ e \ 
given by the Harrisburg Stn 
Quartette which is under the °i ^ 
tion of Mr. Harold Malsh, instruc 
of violin in the Conservatory 



Mrs. Bender of the music dep * he 
ment entertained a number °^ j, 
members of the faculty at dinner 



Temple Owls they sank 19 field | Saturday evening, February 



28. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 5- 1931. 



PAGE THREE 




'Twas a beautiful night in June. 
The light of the moon bathed all the 
w0 rld m a dress of silver. A gentle 
breeze, whispering through the trees, 
an d fcn/3 fluttering of nesting birds 
wer e all that disturbed the silence. 
They sat together beneath a great 
oak tree, and saw nothing in the 
world but each other. He put his 
a rm around her, and she moved clos- 
er, nestling her little blonde head on 
bis big, broad sholder. He bent clos- 
er and closer until the ruby lips were 
just beneath his. All the world 
paused and waited for the loverj's 
kiss, but with a sudden movement 
he drew back. With a deep and ter- 
rible pain in his eyes he gazed at 
h>ar fair face and said mournfully: 
"Darling, you forgot to gargle with 
Listerine." 



One of our fair young things 
boarded the bus for Lebanon the 
other day and for some unknown 
reason become displeased with the 
bus driver, and immediately proceed- 
ed to bawl him out. 

"You bus drivers around here are 
nothing but a bunch of formers," 
growled the coed. 

"Lady" replied the bus driver po- 
litely as he stuck out a well-polished 
shoe, "you don't see any of that stuff 
on my shoes, do you?" 



If the birds that arts always knock- 
ing this joke column would try to 
pound one out for a change, they 
would probably keep their traps shut 
in the future. Here I am, not half 
finished, and I've worn out six reams 
of paper, ten pencils, and all the cuss 
words ever used in the British Navy, 
and all I get for my pains is a fresh 
slice of you know what from ye ed- 
itor because the old bean won't func- 
tion. 



She started for Lebanon and missed 
the bus. 
SHE WOULD 
She decides to "Hop" 
SHE WOULD 

He passes in a nifty roadster. 

HE WOULD 

She hails him. 

SHE WOULD 

He picks her up. 

HE WOULD i 

They get acquainted. 

THEY WOULD 

He pulls up a side road and parks. 
HE WOULD 

Do you want to know what happened 

next. 
YOU WOULD. 



Our idea of a class A modern 
Mother is the one who on coming in- 
to the room where her daughter is 
ln a big clinch with the boy friend 
complains about the cigarette ashes 
^ dropped on the rug. 



Prof — What's wrong with your 

young man? 
Little Fellow — I thing he has a few 
stoaways, mister. 




Recently your editor took occasion 
to discuss the friction between the 
male and female elements of the 
campus. It seems that he based his 
contentions on the scathing anonoy- 
mous epistles which had reached his 
offida. However allow me to state 
that such is not the case. I have 
questioned a few people from both 
sides and according to them no such 
friction exists. Hence it must be 
plain that these letters have come 
from people, who have desired either 
to see their handiwork in print, or 
have chosen the paper as a medium 
for advertising personal prejudices. 

It seems that the author of Joe 
Bass started the row. From a clear 
analysis of that article one cannot 
help but come to the conclusion that 
the writer is nothing more than an 
affected sophist. Fortunately I have 
had the pleasure of reading an an- 
swer to that article which, because 
of its strength in defaming the fair 
sex, had to be rejected. Nevertheless 
it violently condemmed the writer 
of ''Joe Bass" as a fish of the deep- 
est dye. 

Then of course we had that 'edify- 
ing article by D. P. who took occa- 
sion to inform us that women had a 
propensity for "gab". Of course we 
did not know that. Then the Hero- 
Worshiper" had to inform us with a 
wee bit of invective, that the men. 
too, haVa the aforesaid propensity. 
Finally D. P. in order that he may 
squeeze in his last work changes the 
subject entirely and "harps" on 
Friendship. There is no doubt that 
he consulted Bacon. 

All in all it has been childish prat- 
tle. The sooner we cast off the 
shackles of adolescence and realize 
that we are very much alike the bet- 
ter it will be for all parties con- 
cerned. 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



If I can possibly resist the rava- 
ges of that old Demon termed Spring 
]Fever I will try to get this column 
out. Spring sure is a restful time of 
the year. Everything seems to take 
a new grasp on life. I havte taken 
mine on the bed! What is so rare 
as a bed in June! My answer is the 
sanre bed the remaining eleven 
months of the year. 



The big "leaguer's" haven't got a 
thing on the aseball aspirants of this 
college. Any afternoon you can see 
Wikoff, Joe Palooka, Denny, Joe Hut- 
chinson, Luke Shrom, the "Human 
Flagpole" Ited Hugh and others out 
on our campus lazily tossing the 'ol 
Apple around. Looks like a great 
season for the local nine. Won't be 
long now. 

Have you heard Ruth Shroyer's 
latest story? That girl is clever: 



Her yarns are sbnsational! You must 
ccme "oveh". 



In spring a young man's fancy is 
supposed to turn to that's of love and' 
poetry! Being a young man and this 
weather is so "springy" it is only 
natural that I write some poetry. I 
collected my Wits ( ? ? ) and wrote 
the following vbrse. Will you for- 
give me ? 

Mule in barnyard lazy and sick 
Boy with pin on end of stick, 
Boy sticks mule, mule gives lurch 
Services Monday in Corner Church. 



Next Saturday night winds up the 
Basketball season for this year. We 
play our traditional rivals and we 
ARE going to beat them. Lets every- 
one get out and Whoop-er up like 
we never did before. You can leave 
your brass knuckles, knitting, teeth, 
sandwiches, gum, ties, hair, books 
and other accessories at home but 
don't forget to "fetch" your lunsrs! 
I will challenge anycnb to a good old 
fashioned "hollerin" contest. Jest lay 
back yer ears and let go. 



I hope you people won't think I 
have a Vallbe complex by using so 
many personal adjectives but really 
I am the one who writes this column 
and I try to keep my nose out of oth- 
er people's business and therefore 
the only subject I can write authen- 
tically about is myself. 



I TAKE MY HAT OFF TO: GUS 
DAUB'S ability to mind his own bus- 
iness. More of us should develop this 
trait. HESTER THOMPSON'S cheer- 
fulness. SEAGER'S accent. "NOSE" 
BALSBAUGH'S even temper. NAO- 
MI SHIVELY'S dimples. TRULA 
KOCH'S laugh. PAUL KEENE'S 
stage voice. GEORGE NYE'S depen- 
dability. RUTH SHROYER'S stories 
( ? ? ) PHIL. BARNES teeth. JER- 
RY WHITE'S "crooning". FREDDY 
MORRISON'S carriage. BRUTE LEH- 
MAN'S ties. MARY ANN RUPP'S 
"poisonality". GLADYS HERSHEY'S 
coyness. RED RAWHAUSER'S math, 
ability. STUMPY LIGHT'S determin- 
ation. PROF. BEHNEY'S ping-pong. 



Oh, yes ! I forgot to mention the 
fact that not one person has even 
got luke warm on the Junior Prom, 
idea! I have heard some good idea's 
but no one seems to want it, so guess 
it will go the way of all good ideas. 



I have received one name for the 
column anf if I don't get more it 
looks like this person will win the 
celluloid ice-cream cone. Send em in! 



And then we have the Frosh who 
Wa s born in Pittsburg in 1910, but 
^ h o didn't see the light of day until 



he 



came to Annville. 



The old preacher was walking a- 
*S the street one day, and by ac- 
e ident dropped his false teeth 
hr °ugh a grating. All efforts to re- 
£° v er them were of no avail until 
s niall boy produced a chicken bone 
J nd held it at the grating. Rumor 
. as it that the teeth snapped at it 
^mediately. 



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See you at the game Sat. night 
and let's let the boys know that they 
are not alone in the gym. So long. 

O. H. S. 



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33 South Eighth Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



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ISN'T IT 

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TELEPHONED 

<JMoiher and ^Dad 

? 




COLD, GR 

can never give 

this thrill! 

There's all the difference in the world 
between the cold, gray words you 
write and the warm words they hear. 

There's a thrill in a telephone chat 
with mother and dad ! It's next best 
to actually seeing them. 

Make a date to call them up on a 
certain day and at a certain hour 
each week. 

The cost is small — the charges can be 
reversed if you wish. 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 5. 1931. 



PASSERS SWAMP 

G-BURG FIVE 



(Continued from Page 1) 



fought hard and displayed clever 
passwork at times but their efforts 
were futile. Stewarts sharp shooting 
and the team's play in general kept 
the fray one sided. When thb game 
ended Lebanon Valley was on the big 
end of a 43-25 score. 

Stewart led the scorers with 23 
points while Anglemoyer thb Bullet 
flash had 8 points to lead the visit- 
ors. 

Lebanon Valley 

G >F» P 
Stewart F. 10 3 23 

Sprenkle F. 

Morrison F. 

Orsino F. 

HellerC. F. 4 5 13 

Shrom C. 3 17 

S. Light G. 

M. Light G. 

Frey G. 

Wogan G. 

17 9 43 

Gettysburg 

G (F P 
Klinger F. 113 
Citz F, 2 2 

Seeliey (F. 113 
McMillan F. 2 4 

Buohl C. 2 15 

Hass C. 

Jones G. 

Walker G. 

Anglemoyer G. 3 2 8 

Henkel G. 

9 7 25 

Heferee: Julian. 



L. V. C. AFRICA DRIVE 

PLANNED BY "Ys" 



(Continued from Page 1) 



a musical reading, "Your Mission" 
by Ellen M. H. Gates. 

The speaker of the evening, Frrd 
Mund, spokte on the subject of "Shar- 
ing With Others'". He challenged 
thes tudents to share their spiritua 1 
as well as material priviledges with 
students of other lands. He intro- 
duced his talk be relating ir.cidbnt? 
from the Bible, from literature and 
from history, in which he brought 
out the fact that gifts are by far 
more acceptable when they are shared 
by the givbr, and that small gift? 
are received as well as large ones 
He then drew a picture of religion 
and social conditions as they exist 
flt present in Africa, and pointed out 
thb fact that Christianity, the relig- 
ion that will help the natives most, 
lis doomed to failure, unless capable 
and consecrated Christian worker? 
continue to be sent to the dark con- 
tinent. Lebanon Valley Collegia with 
Ptterbein and Indiana Central Col- 
leges, is planning to help the sup- 
port of a missionary teacher on evan- 
gelist to be sent to Africa. Students 
w*ere urged to take the opportunity 
of sharing in this project when they 
are solicited for contributions this 
week. 




On the evening of March 7, the A- 
lumni in New York City and vicinity 
are having a supper at the Brooklyn 
Navy Y. W. C. A. which will be fol- 
lowed by a general get-together 
mbeting . Dr. Harry Imboden and 
Wm. E. Herr are in charge of the 
meeting, Dr. Gossard has been in- 
vited to attend the supper and to ad- 
dress the meeting. 



John R. Geyer, class of 1898, died 
at his homb in Harrisburg, March 1, 
folowing an illness of more than a 
year. Mr. Geyer was one of the most 
widely known lawyers in Central 
Pennsylvania. After hie had been ad- 



mitted to the bar he entered the of- 
fice of John E. Fox and when Judge 
Fox was elevated to the bench in 
1921, Mr. Gayer was named City So- 
licitor of Harrisburg. He filled this 
post until the time of his death. 



We certainly were glad to see the 
following Alumni on our campus 
during the past week: Roy Albright 
'30, Paul Barhart '30 Edgar Hertzler 
'30, Calvin Keene '30, Harvey Nit- 
rauer '28 and George Snyder '29. 



On February 21, Mrs. C. C. Smith, 
nee Ruth Oyer was hostess at her 
home in Wayne Penna. to Mrs. Daw- 
son Horine, nee Esther Sing'er, Mrs. 
David Fink, nee Rachael Hiendle, 
Mrs. Richard 1 Lackaye, nee Katha- 
rine Balsbaugh and Mary Yinger, all 
of whom are charter members of 
Delta Lambda Sigmia. This dinner 
was planned as a Delphian reunion 
because of the fact that they were 
unable to attend the Anniversary on 
the campus. Mrs. David Fink was 
the first Anniversary president of 
Delphian. 



Mrs. C. C. Smith also recently gave 
a party and the guests were: Prof, 
and Mrs. T. B. Beatty, Lolo D'asen- 
berg, Isabel Smith, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Rhoades Stabley. 



JUNIATA EVENS 

SCORE WITH L. V. C. 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Lebanon Valley 

G p T 
Yingst R. F. 2 5 9 



A-l SI 




WORKS WONDERS] 







ANMVILLE SHQEMAN 

207 W. Main 



Hershey L. F. 


1 


1 


3 


Miller L. F. 











Engle C. 











Gossard C. 











Armacost S. C. 











Rupp R. G. 











Weirick L. G. 

















12 


Juniata 










G 


F 


P 


Fouse R. F. 


3 


3 


9 


Replagle L. F. 


4 





8 


Hower L. F. 











Smith C. 











Fleck S. C. 











Sell S. C. 











Houck R. G. 











Howe L. G. 

















17 



Referela: Beatty 



DEBATERS LOSE 

BOTH CONTESTS 



(Continued from Page 1) 



saving an audience from disappoint- 
ment in taking a position contrary 
to that which they had prepared. 

The home team was made up of 
Gilbert Mariano, Herman Mariano, 
Russell Etter and Horace Hallman, 
alternate. The visiting team was 
composed of Thomas Gealey, How- 
ard Amos, Leslie Werner, and Wil- 
liam Wright, alternate. The judges 
were Prof. A. C. Bangher, dean of 



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LET'S GO— 

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38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 

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Elizebethtown College, Prof. Arthur 
Schrager of the Lebanon High School 
and Prof. Mary E. Clemens of the 
Hershey High School, Russell Den- 
ns managed the home team. 

Our affirmative team, visiting 
Wbstern Maryland College, also 
changed sides and thus took the neg- 
ative position. Putting up a splen- 
did opposition after but one hour of 
preparation, they lost by a vote of 
itwo to one. This team consisted of 
Gerald Heilman, Robert Womer, and 
Edmund Umbbrger with George Pa- 
trizio as manager. 



SOPH QUINTETTE 

BEATS FROSH 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Sophomores 





G 


F 


p 


Kraybill F. 


1 


1 


3 


Clements F. 


2 





4 


Saylor C. 


3 





6 


Speg G. 


4 





8 


Zach G. 











Shrope G. 













10 


1 


21 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



DEFEAT THE SOUTH 
ON TO VIRGINIA 
GIRLS! 



VOLUME VIII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 12 1931. 



No. 2 



L.V.C. and Albright Divide Basketball Honors 



MYLENMEN LOSE 
TO ALBRIGHT 

BLUE AND WHITE UNABLE 
TO KEEP UP PACE 
IN SECOND HALF 



Before the largest crowd to wit- 
.ness a home basketball ganie this 
season, the fast Albright five gained 
a second victory over Lebanon Val- 
ley in the Lebanon High Gym. Sat. 
jnight by a score of 47-39. 

The game was a thriller through- 
out and due credit must be handed 
the boys from Reading, they played 
the fastest floor game the Blue and 
White has been up against all sea- 
son. Quick breaking, clever pass- 
work and \baffiing dribbling exhib- 
itions featured the tilt with the lads 
from Pretzelvillie holding a slight 
lead in every department. Lebanon 
Valley did not display the accuracy 
and steadiness that brought them the 
overwhelming victory at the hands 
of Bucknell, but due credit must be 
given them for placing one of the 
scrappiest aggregations that ever 
handled a basketball on the floor. 

The breath taking actions began 
with the first tip-off. Lebanon Val- 
ley gained posession of the ball but 
their play failed to work. Karlip 
intercepted a pass and sank the first 
field goal of the game. Heller then 
fouled Haines under the basket and 
one good foul shot gave Albright 
a three point lead. Karlip made an- 
other foul before the Valley was able 
to score. Stewart drew first blood 
against the visitors, sinking a beau- 
tiful shot from the side of the court. 
\ickery fouled Morrison under the 
"basket, both shots were good tying 
the score. The lead see-sawed back 

(Continued on Page 4) 



PHILO ENDS PING 

PONG TOURNAMENT 



The Philo ping-pong tournament! 
kas finally come to an end. Prof. 

Bruce Behnley has proved himself 
l he best wielder of the paddle out 
°f thirty-six members of the Philo- 
k °smian Literary Society. The tourn- 
ament has been in progress for the 
ast three weeks and competition has 
Seen very keen. Rawhouser gave the 
;vi nner somle opposition and Keene 
and Mentzer deserve honorable men- 
tion fo r having reached the semi-fin- 
als. 

The following were the elimina- 
l ons: Winners of the first matches: 
jjeene, Dennis, Stewart, Watkins, 

Yers, Ranck, Goodman, Rawhouser, 
K °hler, Hughes, Wolf, Behney, Ev- 
J»coe, Mentzer, Werner, Rhen; Win- 
^T rs of the next matches: Keene, 

atkins, Ranck, Rawhouser, Hughes, 
fi e hney, Mentzer, and Rhen; Semi- 

n al s: Keene, Rawhouser, Behney, 

t> , Mentzer; Finals Rawhouser and 
8 ehm av 

Ce ne Pmg-pong set has proved suc- 
& s sful j n stimulating inlerest in this 
h le ty, for which purpose it was 



MEN DEBATERS LOSE 

TO WAYNESBURG 



The boy's debating team of the col- 
lege lost to the team of Waynesburg 
College last Friday evening in Philo 
Hall. This subject for debate was, 
•'Resolved, that all the states should 
adopt compulsory unemployment in- 
surance." Our team composed of Ger- 
ald Heilman, Herman Marianno, Rus- 
sel Etter, and Edmund Umberger, al- 
ternate, put up a good fight, but the 
battle was lost by one vote of the 
[judges. The Waynesburg team was 
xceptionally good, and the matching 
& wits throughout the entire debate 
proved very interesting to a fair sized 
audience. The visiting team was 
made up of Eric Eristron. Kenneth 
McPerson, Charles Farrel, and Wil- 
liam Dusenberry. The visitors took 
the negative position. The judges 
were Prof. J. I. Baugher, supervis- 
ing principle of the Hershey Schools, 
Mr. Clarence Becker, Lawyer of Leb- 
anon, and Mr. J. D. Leopold, a ban- 
ker of Lebanon. While neither the 
teams of the boys nor the teams of 
the girls have to date won a debate, 
the prospects are bright for the fu- 
ture, and the educational value at- 
tached to these questions debated 
can scarcely be estimated. 



SOPHS WIN AGAIN 
DEFEAT JUNIORS 



CAUSE TRIPLE TIE IN 
INTER-MURAL 
CONTEST 



The Sophomores added another 
victim to their list by trouncing the 
Juniors, last year's inter-class cham- 
pions, to the tune of 22-20 last Thurs- 
day evening in the "ice-box". The 
Sophomores presenting a neat pass- 
ing combination got going early in 
the fray and never delinquished their 
lead and the half time score stood 
13-7 in favor of the class of '33. At 
the start of the second half the up- 
perclassmen managed to creep up to 
within four points of the Sophs but 
here the rally fell short when Say- 
lor dropped one in from the side of 
the court. The Juniors came up twice 
to tie the count at 18 all and 20 all 
but Barnes, Soph forward, ended the 
game with an overhead shot from 
the sidelines. The game was one 
of the most exciting seen this year 
because the championship was at 
sake. The Sophs, however, outshone 
the Juniors. 

Barnes led the Sophs in scoring 
«ind Salek tallied most for the Jun- 
iors. Shrope Soph guard was a tow- 
er of strength on the defensive and 
was responsible for breaking up at 

(Continued on Page 4) 



GIRL DEBATERS 
BOW TO E-TOWN 

FIRST DEBATE FOR 
WOMEN WELL 
CONTESTED 



Both the affirmative and negative 
teams of the girls lost to the Eliza - 
Wehtown girls on Wednesday even- 
ing, March 4th. It was the first de- 
bate of the season for each of our 
teams, and the prospects are fine 
that after this debut, they will cap- 
ture quite a few victories during the 
season. Both teams debated on the 
question, Resolved, That All Nations 
Adopt Free Trade. 

At home, Gertrude Paul, Katherine 
Mowrey, Anna Matula, and Margar- 
ete Kohler, alternate upheld the af- 
firmative side. Before a fair sized 
audie,nce which provled very atten- 
tive, the girls of the contesting 
teams presented we 1 1-p r e <a r e d 
speeches. However, the Elizabeth- 
town team proved the better and se- 
cured, a victory of 3-0. 

Miss Lietzau presided over the de- 
bate, while Miss Clemens of the Her- 
shey High School, Miss Apple of the 
Annville High School, and Mr. Bru- 
baker of Lebanon acted as judges. 
The girls of the visiting team were 
Irene Shrom, Ruth Landis, Mrs. Say- 
lor, and Anna Reese, alternate. 

At Elizabethtown our negative 
team consisted of Martha Daily, Eul- 
alie Morton, Bettie Shoch, and Viola 
Williams, alternate lost with a de- 
cision of 3-0. The concensus of opin- 
ion is that after alterations in the 
speeches and corrections of certain 
fallacies are made, the girls will 
bring home more than one scalp. 



SOPHOMORE GIRLS 

ENTERTAINED BY "Y" 



On Thursday afternoon, March 6, 
p,t 3:30 oclock the Y. W. C. A. cab- 
inet entertained the Sophomore girls 
at a tea in North Hall Parlor. The 
class was Well represented, practic- 
ally all of its girls being present. 
Missi Ruth Coble, the Sophomore 
member of the Y. W. cabinet, grace- 
fully performed her dutiles as host- 
ess. A pleasant atmosphere for the 
affair was created by the afternoon 
music afforded by the radio. Cards 
wtere the chief feature of the after- 
noon's entertainment; some girls in- 
dulged in "500", others in bridge. 
The climax arrived when delicious 
refreshments wtere served by the 
members of the Y. W. cabinet, with 
Mrs. Paul A. W. Wallace and Miss, 
Mary S. Johnson, faculty advisors, 
pouring. The Sophomores join with 
the upper-classmen and the freshmen 
in their praises of the *'Y's" teas. 



BERNARD SHAW'S COMEDY 
CHOSEN FOR KALO 



Monday and Tuesday night found 
all Kalo's over at the Conservatory, 
under the direction of Miss M. K. 
Waltace, trying to put their person- 
alities to use in finding suitable parts 
in the play, which Kalo play com- 
mittee has selected. ''Androcles And 
The Lion." 

Miss M. K. Wallace patiently 
worked with the boys in order to find 
proper characters to portray and do 
justice to the play which is written 
by that brilliant philosopher, George 
Bernard Shaw. After some difficul- 
ties the cast was finally selected. The 
following cast has been selected: 

Audrocles — "Babe" Early. 

Megaera — Trula Koch 

Lion — Walter Krumbeiglle 

Centurion — Earl Fry. 

Captain — Joseph Hutchinson 

Lavinia — Eva Peck 

Spintho — William Leegar 

(Ferrovius — Leanard Shrope 

Lecutor — Robert Hughes 
Lentulus — Percy Clements 

Metullus — Arnold Pipilen 

Keep of the Lions — Wm. Speg 

Caesar — The Emperor — 

Allen Buzzell 

The Editor — George Derickson 

Gladiators — Lee Stone, Alvin Rin- 
ney, John Todd, 

Ox Driver — Earl Hoover 

The Call Boy— George Shirk 

The play will be presented Friday 
night, March 27, 1931 at the celebra- 
tion of the fifty-fourth anniversary 
of Kalozetean Literary Society. Miss 
M. K. Wallace will diriect the play. 



BUCKNELL BISONS 
DEFEATED 58-27 

L. V. C. CAGERS RUN UP 
BIGEST SCORE OF 
SEASON 



The Lebanon Valley basketball 
team journed to Lewisburg last Wed- 
nesday night tnd trounced the high- 
ly touted Bucknell five by a one-sided 
score 58-27. 

The game was one sided all the 
way thru but the score fails to indi- 
cate the type of game it really was. 
Although played on a poorly lighted 
floor the accurate passing and fast 
floorwork of each team made it one 
of the fastest games played by the 
locals this season. 

The valley started off with a bang 
and due to the excellent shooting 
and team work of Hleller, Mlorrison 
and Stewart had little trouble in 
gaining a decided lead. The half 
ended with the Blue and White lead- 
ing 27-11. 

The second half was much faster 
than the first. Each team scored 
two more field goals than during the 
previous period but the fast charg- 
ing and accurate shooting L. V. five 
couldn't be stopped. Time after time 
the sensational shooting of Stewart 
(Continued on P*age 4) 



GIRLS VICTORS 
OVER ALBRIGHT 

EASY GAME FOR L. V. C. 
ALBRIGHT SWAMPED 
22-20 



In an easy victory the girl's bas- 
ketball team of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege truimphed over the Albright las- 
sies, Saturday (evening, March 7, in 
[he Lebanon High School gymna- 
sium. From beginning to end it was 
decidely Lebanon Valley's game. 

In the first few minutes of the 
fray, the AnnviMe sextette had the 
Reading team completely bewildered 
by their excellent passing and shoot- 
ing. The Albright guards found it 
unable to check Yingst and Hershey, 
agilie forwards of the Lebanon Val- 
ley line-up. The passing of Arma- 
cost and Gossard in the center to the 
Annville forwards made it possible 
for L. V. to roll up the score at the 
very start. The half ended with Leb- 
anon Valley leading, 20-5. 

The second half of he game was 
more exciting as Albright forged a- 
head and succeeded in nletting twelve 
shots, raising her score to seventeen 
points. However the lead for the 
Blue and White was too great for the 
Reading team to overcome. Lebanon 
Valley was able to raise her score 
only sevbn points. The ball was in 
dangerous territory a S"ond nart of 
+he time during the last quarter, be- 
ing in the forward section thp A 1 - 
bright team but Runn and Weir'ck 
did some neat enardinfr. making it 
imnosible for Porter and Kutz, for- 
wards for Readint? to m 01 ''? g<v>d 
their shots, although they did make 
many attempts. 

Herohev was hifth scorer for Leb- 
anon Valley, pulling seventeen points 
(Continued on Page 4) 



GERMAN CLUB MEETS 

\ IN SOUTH HALL 



A regular meeting of the German 
Club was held on Monday evening, 
March 9, at 7:30 o'clock in South 
Hall Parlor. The meeting was called 
to order by Ethel Hower, the presi- 
dent. After a short business session, 
Dr. Lietzau very interestingly told 
the German students somie facts a- 
bout Vienna, Austria, where seh for- 
merly spent some time. Among other 
things she discussed the university 
as well as the public school system. 
She also described the capital build- 
ings and other public edifices of the 
city and said that the restaurants 
are like a second home to the Aus- 
trian family. She then touched on 
the plan over which the city is laid 
out, the statues, and the language, 
and in conclusion stated that she 
would very willingly select Vienna 
for a permanent residence. 

The meeting was brought to a close 
by singing a few German songs and 
everyone present voted it one of the 
most interesting meetings of the year 
as well as the most well-atended. 



i'AGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, .MARCH 12 1931. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

.4. weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 Kditor-in-Chief 

Fred MunU, "62 Associate Ktiitoi 

Hilda D. Buckley, '32. .Associate Kditor 
Dorothy Garber, '32. . . .Associate Kditor 
Walter Krumbiegel, '33, 

Managing Editor 

REl'OltTOKlAL STAFF 

Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32 

Llizabetn Ulriok, '32 

Edward Shellonbeiger, '33 

Edmund Umberger, "34..Gen'l Reporter 

George Snowhill, 'o4 Conservatory 

Percy Clements, '33 Athletics 

Jane Muth, '33 Clionian 

Arline Heckrote, '33 Delphian 

Clarence Earley, '33 Kalozetean 

Chester Goodman, '33 Philokosmian 

Gloria Lavanture, '33.. Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Robert Rawhouser, '32, 

Business Manager 

Herman Mariano, '33, 

Ass't Business Manager 
Paul Kleinfelter, '32, 

Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



EXTRA! EXTRA! 



It is to be regretted that we do not 
know what is going on in the world 
around us. We live in our own little 
circle, with our books, onr friends, 
our pleasures, but we fail to know 
what our cousins in Russia, England, 
Japan etc. or even persons who live 
across the street are doing. We hear 
that someone won the Pulitzer Prize 
in Poetry for 1930 or that Einstein 
has given the people another bril- 
liant discovery on the subject of 
space or what not that the Republi- 
can Party has changed it policies, 
that the government was almost on 
the verge of war, that Albania has 
become a democracy or the like, but 
we hear these reports in a vague 
sort of way, perhaps months after 
th!ey have happened. No one tries 
seriously to discover what is behina 
these activities. Instead one studies 
industriously about the great Caro- 
line Song Writers, that Southey was 
once poet-laurieatie of England, and 
feels verp self-satisfied in his know- 
ledge; another delves into the mys- 
teries of Archimedes and navels in 
his extraordinary way of thinking 
which so astounded the world at that 
time; another commits to memory the 
policies of the political parties which 
existed during Monroe's time; an 
other explores the histories for the 
conditions which were prevalent be- 
fore and during the Mexican War and 
can expound at great length on why 
the United States engaged in those 
bloody battles; other history students 
wade through the resolutions which 
occurred during the nineteeth century 
in Europe and learn the various 
changes which were made in the pos- 
sesions of European territories. Odd, 
is it not. We will study of the prize 
poet years from now; we will read 
Einstein twenty years hence with un- 
belief and astonishment; when we are 
party leaders of our political party 
in our vinicity wle will go back sev- 
eral years and discover the condi- 
tions which Existed in 1931; we will 
know why the World War was fought 
when the next war is with us; we 
will deligently study the conditions 
in Europe between 1925-1950 when 
those year's have long passted by. 
And so it is! And why! Are we so 
short-sighted, so backward in our liv- 
ing that we will let the wonders of 



the present day, the ever-increasing 
marviels of the time, slip by and not 
take account ? Our eyes are open 
but we do not see; our ears are open 
but we do not hear. What is needed 
to awaken us, to rouse us from this 
lethargy? Our four years in college 
are short but they should be full 
years. They should be overflowing 
with knowledge, not only that which 
we get from books, from antiquity, 
but what we gat from everyday ob- 
servation, of being wide-awake, being 
conscious of what is transpiring in 
this day and age. We become too 
dilatory, neglecting this or that from 
day to day; we allow ourselves to 
settle into a state of coma in which 
we are satisfied with what we are 
doing. We are content with our day's 
lesson for have we not learned that 
there was a great financial panic in 
1837 — not realizing that the country 
is now going through one of the most 
serious slumps that United States 
has ever known. "Let that be for 
study in graduate work, we say. More 
material will be able to be obtained, 
then." Of course, let's not give our 
own minds a chance to funtion on a 
problem of this sort. We would not 
understand it and furthermore there 
are others who are considering the 
problem. Wait until they bring forth 
their results. 

Is this the way we really live? It 
seems to be the atmosphere in which 
•a great number of students are exist- 
ing. Perhaps we could learn some- 
thing we had not known from the 
newspapers. Sometimes there is 
somthing of account in the daily 
sheet. Who knows? But especially 
let's keep our eyes and ears open. 
Let's know what is happening a- 
,'':ound us. As Robert Louis Steven- 
son said, "Books are alright in their 
own way bu they're mighty blood- 
less substitue for life." 



•Gymnasium. Those that have Entered 
are Junior Light, Bill Barnes, Fred 
Morrison, Max Light, Lee Stone, Bill 
Brown, and 1 "Ike" Buzzelle. The new 
boys took their degree in a very 
friendly spirit. The affair lasted for 
two hours and the members went a- 
way feeling "warm and satisfied". It 
is hoped that the new boys will find 
Kalo Society worthwhile and will 
soon acquire the right "Kalo Spirit". 

Friday night, March 6, Kalo opened 
up its newly decorated hall and invit- 
ed the campus to a "house warming" 
The affair started after the debate 
and lasted till the last stroke of the 
eleventh hour, when the couples slow- 
ly wended homeward. The evening 
was spent in dancing and bridge play- 
,\ing. Music for the occasion was fur- 
J'nished by radio and club talent. The 
^entertainment rangiad from "The Cli- 
jquot Club Eskimos" to "Kid Choco- 
jlate's Gum Drop Quartet." Variety 
'was offered to a great extent, deal- 
ing with popuar ballads to barn dan- 
r ce selections. President Becker did his 
j part in making everyone welcome. 
I The evening finally broke up with 
jthe guests complimenting Kalo So- 
ciety on their local talent in interior 
^decorating. 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



The Clionian literary society held 
its regular weekly meeting in Clio 
hall. The president informed us that 
the basket ball game with Delphian 
would ibe postponed until after the 
basketball season by the request of 
Miss Fencil, coach of the girl's var- 
sity basketball. 

Miss Dorothy Snyder led the de- 
votional exercises, after which the 
meeting was turned over to the Jun- 
ior girls. 

Due to the numerous activities of 
the evening, the Juniors gave a short 
but "snappyf' impromptu program, 
expressing the desire to portray their 
ability at entertaining later in the 
Spring. 

The first number on the program 
was "Country Gardens" charmingly 
played by Dorothy Garber whose 
musical technique has so oftien been 
heard in the Clionian circle Eulalie 
Morton added a bit af laughter to 
the program by reading Eugene 
Field's "The Gingham Dog and the 
Calico Cat." Perhaps as the stuffed an- 
imals of many descriptions seen in 
the dormitories inspired her to choose 
this selection. "Tea for Two" and 
"By My Side" were beautifully sung 
by Loraine Seely who, although a 
former soloist for Clio is quite a re- 
cent one for the underclassmen. Last- 
ly Ann Kiehl read quite effectively 
"Patters" by Ann Lowell. 

The talent of the Junior girls was 
w'ell brought cut in this short but 
well-rendered program. 



The regular meeting of Delphian 
Literary Society was held on Friday 
j evening, March 6. Devotions were 
: conducted by the chaplain, Marie 
|Gelwicks. A brief program was then 
j presented. 

Evangeline Salorio sang Schubert's 
j 'Serenade", accompanied at the piano 
by Gem Gemmell. She interpreted 
that familiar and lovely song in a 
pleasing manner. Eva Peck gave a 
clever sketch of a modern poet. Ed- 
win Markham, setting forth vividly 
the high spots of his life, his early 
hardships, and ultimate success. Eva 
dwelt chiefly on his poems "The Man 
with the Hoe," for which he received 
J inspiration from Millet's famous pic- 
ture "The Gleaners". He seems 
to have caught' a glimpse of some- 
thing in that picture which |com- 
monly escapes odservation, and has 
immortalized it in his famous poem. 
Dorothy Ely brought the program to 
a close with two v*ery delightful pi- 
ano solos, "The Sun Showers," and 
"Firm an Indian Lodge" by Mac- 
Dowbll. After a few remarks by 
the Critic, Ruth Shroyer, the meeting 
was adjourned. 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



The Kalozetean Literary Society 
has had a recent addition in mem- 
bership. Seven new members were 
given the third and last degree on 
Thursday evening, March 5, 1931. 
Preparations and the final adjust- 
ments were* made in the Alumni 



The Philo meeting on Friday, Mar. 
6 was short. Due to the absence of 
the chaplainfi Fried Mund conducted 
devotions. 

Edward Shellenberger gave a dis- 
cussion cn the subject, "Why We 
Believe What We Believe." Useing 
pome plain illustrations hie showed 
how we arrive at some of our be- 
liefs. He pointed out some errors 
in judgment and then emphasized the 
importance of think i n g things 
through before accepting them as 
truth. Mr. Shellenberger's talk was 
interesting and thought provoking. 

Joe Rhen, whose talent as a pian- 
ist had been shown in previous meet- 
ings, then favorled the society with 
several popular numbers. 

For the last several meetings, im- 
oromptu speeches have been a fea- 
ture of Philo programs. The lot flell 
on Ulrich and Kraybill on this oc- 
casion. Mr. Ulrich set forth the 
"Advantages and Disadvantages of 
Cave Man Tacticsi" Both his sub- 
ject matter and gestures were highly 
."musing. Mr. Kraybill spoke on "The 
Absent-minded Professor." Thlese 
extemporaneous speeches, besides be- 



ing gocd training for the speakers, 
are very intertaining to the members 
of the society. 

Mr. Dellinger, the editor, ended the 
program with "Living Thoughts." 
After the critic's report by Robert 
Rawhouser the mieeting was ad- 
journed. 

Plans are being formed now to 
make this anniversary the best in 
the history of the society. The play 
ccimmittee, meeting with Dr. Wal- 
lace, has chosen "The Knight of the 
Burning Pestle," by Beaumont and' 
Fletcher. Tryouts for the various 
parts are being held this week. 




The final tally for individual scor- 
ing including all the games in as fol- 
lows: 

G F P 
Stewart 87 38 208 

Heller 72 51 195 

Morrison 17 8 52 

S. Light 11 12 32 

M. Light 8 6 22 

(Frey 9 2 20 

Orsino 9 2 20 

Sprenkle 4 19 

Shrom 4 19 

Williams 113 
Reeder 10 2 

Fernsler 1 2 

Wogan 

H. Light 

Letham 

Stonle 

224 124 572 
Stewart led the. scorer with Cal. 
coming second. Morrison tallied 13 
points in the Bucknell to bring him 
up to third place. Orsino also ros'e 
from 8th to tie for 6th place. 



For curiosity's sake and to give 
the players an idea how their foul 
shooting averages the following ta- 
ble has been arranged including all 
the games of the past season. May- 
be our lax foul shooting could have 
influenced those one point losses. 
Player A F P 

Heller 94 51 54.2 

Stiewart 67 38 58.2 

Morrison 26 8 30.7 

S. Light 19 12 63.1 

M. Light 14 6 42.5 

Orsino 9 2 22.2 

Sprenkle 9 7 77.7 

Frey 7 2 29.9 

Shrom 5 1 20 

Williams 2 1 50 

Reeder 2 

Wogan 4 

Letham 4 CO 

Fernsler 4 00 

H. Light 3 00 

267 124 72.0 



To bad we can't handle the Al- 
bright lads as good as our co-eds 
handle the lassies from Reading. That 
was a great gamle girls, they are still 
wondering what happened during the 
latter part of the game, maybe a 
little pep talk betwden the halves 
was reponsible for heir spurt or may- 
be it was the oranges, figure it out 
for yourself. 



Bucknell's "Thund e r i n g Herd" 
turnied out to be fine "meat". From 
the way rumour have been circulat- 
ing the spectators sounded like a 
bunch of Indians on the warpath, a- 
gain the pioneer idea is stamped out, 
the Indians were therte first. That 
58-27 victory is something worth 
writing home about. 



thing that outfit trys seems to work 
v if you have any ideas you want t' 
work for sure, send them to Al 
bright. "Lady Luck" has a flourshing- 
sub-station there. 



We've often heard of feeding the 
baby onions so you can find him in 
the dark. The Albright outfit had 
the same idea in mind when they 
dressed Haines in white trunka, they 
found him too and nearly every time 
they did it meant two points. Every- 



Well now the basketball season 
over we can look back on a fai r sea- 
son. ' We won ten and lost six. Tw- 
of our lossJes were by one point bu 
just the same it was a loss. Buck- 
nell received the worst beating We 
handed out and Temple gave us the 
most powerful sock. 



Within the next few days, as soon 
as the weather permits the call will 
be given for prospective "Bahe 
Ruths" and "George Earnshaws" 
those trying to take Neil Altroch's 
place will be asked to confine their 
playing to pitching in front of the 
dormitories wher*e the co-eds can of-, 
fer a appreciating audience, the 
coaches have enough trouble trying 
to keep the regulars from appear- 
ing as clowns, if you batted .900 i n 
High School and nevbr made an er- 
ror, it might be worth your wile to 
take the daily hike to the little green 
just this side of Cleona. 




Students and friends will be glad 
to hear that Dr. Gossard, who has 
been confined to his home since last 
Tuesday with the grippe, is reported 
to be improving. 



Two members of the faculty were 
recent speakers at a meeting of L. 
V. Alumni at Brooklyn and Balti- 
more. Prof. Stokes o fthe Depart- 
ment of Business Administration 
spoke on Saturday night at a reunion 
at Brooklyn, and Dr. Wallace, of the 
English Department spoke on (Friday 
night at the meeting at Baltimore. 



A number of faculty members were 
guests of Miss Minnie Gossard on 
Friday night when she entertained 
her club at bridge. Those present 
Who represented the college were 
Mrs. Green, Miss Lietzau, Miss John- 
son, Mrs. Bender, Miss Gillispie, Mrs. 
Grimm and Mrs, Gingrich. 




The Y. W. C. A. meeting on Sun- 
day evening was given by the Day 
Student Girls, led by Ann Agusta 
Esbenshade. athryn Young acted aS 
pianist during the service. 

Dorothy Snyder led in devotions 
basing her remarks on Matt. 25:31* 
46. Dorothy Hartz gave a reading 
"What Shall I Be," by Mary Hunter 
Walch, in which the fact was stressed 
that it is not necessary for one 
drift in life and practical sug£ 
tions wiere given for the finding 
a vocation. Mildred Bomberger 
a vocal solo, "My Task". Ruth 
ler read a poem, "The Faster is 



idingr 
unter 
essed 
re & 



Com- 
lle, 



ing", by Russel Herch. "Polichme 
by Rachmaninoff, was exception* 1 
well tendered by Dorothy Haldefl^ 
at the piano. Luella Umberger 
an article, "Understanding Oursel 
and Others," in which pointed S°> 
gestions were made as to ho w 
may help ourselves as well as ^, 
to get along in our daily ass 
tion with others. The service ^ 
concluded with a prayer by 
Engle. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 12 1931 



PAGE THREE 



THE BOOMERANG 

THE COLLEGE DAY 
(As we see it) 



10:00 A. M. — Breakfast consisting 
f tea and toast, with a Bromo-Selt- 
zer for those who have a ''hang-over" 
from the night before. 

11:00 — Classes, with all the cuts 
you want. 

12:00 Noon — Luncheon, consisting 
of, not "dogs," but just anything the 
old stomach cravas. 

1:00 P. M. — Afternoon to be devot- 
ed to bridge, sleep, a hike along the 
"Quit tie" with the flame, pinochle, 
socializing, "bull" sessions, loafing 
in the Pennway, or what do you want. 

6:00 P. M.— Dinner. The kind you 
you di'jam about when you're trying 
to carve some of the scrap iron now 
served as liver. 

8:00 P. M.— A "hop" with Duke El- 
lington and Ben Bernie furnishing 
the harmony. 

3:00 A. M.— "Don't wake me up in 
the A. M., room-mate, I'm gonna cut 
classes." 



Ulrich says he's strong for South 
Hall girls everytime, but investiga- 
tion shows that it's South Hall, Ur- 
sinus College, Collegeville, Pennsyl- 



vania. 



And now we have the detective 
song, "I'm Following You." 



"Mini" Owen tells me her motto is 
that a rolling snow-ball gathers no 
frost. 



Spiaaking of snow, didja hear a- 
bout the Eskimo bandit who held up 
a snow bank in order to secure some 
cold cash. 



Miriam: Do' you have a speaking 
part in the "Kalo" play? 

John: No, I play the part of the 
husband. 



This column will positively print 
no jokes about absent-minded profes- 
sors, Scotchm<2n,< or boot-leggers. 



Sign in a restaurant: Eat here — 
diet home. 



Hester Thompson tells me that 
thirty is the proper age for a Woman. 
Well, if she isn't proper by that time, 
she probably never will be. 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



Once again time to pen the col- 
umn. The weeks may come and the 
Weeks may go but this column goes 
on just the same. So again I must 
get the "little brown book" out and 
Se e what I can find in the way of 



Preston Kohlor won the prize for 
fast" ones last week. The other 
%ht Mons. Kohler strolled forth 
* r °m the Dorm, in quest of what 
nc le Sam might have in store for 
His room mates werte confident 
na t he would bring whatever mail 
tne y had. Consequently they did not 
* 0rr y. Lo and behold! Preston re- 
plied with the news that each on'3 
°f his room mates had a laundry bag 
at the p. o. but he didn't bring them 
as he hated to carry their bags! What 
a Pal! 



* know a blonde-haired boy who 
^° es home evbry week-end, returns 
er y Monday afternoon and has a 



letter back home by 4:30. Must be 
some attraction. 



j. he most excruciating pain is aj 
^ooon-acnei 'me ouier nignc wfiUti 
euung a sandwnicn 1 suddenly grao- 
ueu my jaw and opened my mouin 
iiKe a Mississippi cairisli, at tne same 
uiue let out a yell tnat wouid nave 
uone justiea to a iSouix inuian lun 
ox hre-water. There wasn't mucn to 
oe done aoout tne acning memoer 
mat night but as tne poet's say, 
came tne dawn", l did a unaney 
x addock down to the d/intist's ouice. 
x uougnt tne Dr. eating his breaK- 
last but managed to mumDie out tnat 
i was in dire need of attention. 

Well, he puts me in his torture seat 
and start to work! Alter probing 
uiound with a singna tined iork he 
locates the seat oi trouDle. All the 
wmle I had my mouth wide open ana 
tne air was whistling through that 
molar like a "nor easter". he gets 
a tool out that looked like a syrum 
ejector we use when the hogs gets 
me Cholic back in loway. He runs 
this thing in my jaws up to the hnt 
and I begins to squirm I Finally, 
ne is done shooting and says for me 
to take it easy until this stuff taktes 
a hold. Pretty soon my mouth be- 
gins to feel like a wooden leg and he 
says he is about ready to tow that 
fang out of there. I gets set! H2 
goes over to a big supboard and gets 
out the biggest pair of pliers that I 
over saw! Then he says gentle lika, 
"this isn't going to hurt — much". 
The minute he puts them pliers on 
that tooth, I jumps. I grabbed him 
around the neck with a half-Nelson 
and puts my foot through a waterin' 
trough he had for me to spit in. All 
the time he is pullin' and yankin' at 
that darn tooth, and me a yellin'. At 
last he gives one last twist on her 
an out; she comes! He said it was 
a cross between a Mastadon and a 
Moutain Canary's. Iifj any of you 
people are in any doubt as to the 
size of this tooth, come around on 
the quiet and I'll show it to you. 



The Junior Prom. Idea is gradual- 
ly being talked up but not much en- 
thusiasm is being shown. How a- 
bout it? 



Johnny Hughes won the hollerin' 
contest at the game last Sat. night. 
I should have thought of it and hand- 
icapped him. I admit it wasn't fair 
to the rest of the contestants. Well 
you forgive me? Nice work John. 



The latest confection craze to hit 
the campus is in the form of the old 
fashioned Jelly-Beans. Rudy Miller, 
Bill Barnes and Roy Lechthaler have 
revived this old time concoction. 



I have been warned about giving 
any organizations on the campus free 
publicity but, I wil say now, that the 
Kalo's are to be congratulated on 
their anniversary idea. It is going 
to be THE social event of the season. 
"Brute" Lehman is to be commended 



PRINTING— 

Stationery, Announcements, 
Publications, Catalogues, 
Booklets, Etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO' 

Annville - - - Penna. 



THIS IS A QUALITY SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

Service, Workmanship and Materials 
Hand Stitching 

W. D. ELLIOTT, JR. 

140 N. Railroad St., 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



on his efforts and I sincerely hope 
that the party is a big success. Nice 
work gang! 



Several people have informed me 
that they are working on a title for- 
tius column. Lets have 'em. I know 
Ruth Shroyer won't hand one in as 
she is "ireful" at me for making 
foolish of her stories. 
So long. O. H. S. 




Miss Mary K. Wallace, associate 
professor of English has permitted 
this paper to publish some of the best 
themes which her pupils submit. In 
the past few weeks several excellent 
essays have been printed imitating 
Bacon's style. This week we offer 
one concerning the delightful char- 
acter of Sir Roger de Coverley, who 
is the product of the familiar essay- 
ists, Addison and Ste'ele. Miss Dor- 
othy Ely, a member of the freshman 
class, penned the following: 

jSIR ROGER AT 

THE ANNIVERSARY 



Knowing full well Si 1 " Roger's- de- 
light in the enjoyment of good plays, 
I asked the old knight to accompa- 
ny me to the Kappa Lambda Nu an- 
niversary. He aceepvd the invita- 
tion with pleasure, saying with a 
smile, "You must know that I have 
not attended a play these many years, 
and am happy at bofrig thus 'inform- 
ed of this excellent one."' 
1 When we had arrived in Engle 
Hall, wb were ushered to our places 
by a very attractive maiden. Both 
her features and her gown were 
pleasing to the knight and they 
caused him to stare at her. Conse- 
quently he sat in the wrong seat. But 
he passed off the mistake by a wave 
of his hand and a merry chuckle. 

Beff>r'e the opening of the play Sir 
Roger stood up and looked about him 
at the crowd of people. He was high- 
ly delighted at the jeering and boo- 
ing of the boys when the young folks 
appeared. Upon the entrance of the 
next couple he sat to booing in his 
loudest voice, much to my embarrass- 
ment, for the couple happened to be 
none other than a faculty member 
and his young lady friend. 

At the rising of the curtain the 
knight became quitie, but at the con- 
clusion of almost 'every scene he 
made many remarks concerning the 
actors, and he kept whispering 
in my ear that he could not conceive 
how the play would end. 

At the close of the first act the 
lights came on brightly and w r e were 
able to see about us. Sir Roger, be- 
ing highly interested in our fashions 
of dress, intently studied the Tuxedo 
on the man sitting behind him. He 
finally remarked that he would rather 



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have a "cedar chest" than sit all 
evening in ,one of those straight^ 
jackets. 

To the knight's right sat a lovely 
young girl, beautifully attired. The 
old gentleman watched her for some 
minutes, reflecting on where he had 
seen her likeness before. Suddenly 
he addressed her; "Now I know you, 
for your are the exact image of the 
Jbeautiful, commanding widow whom 
I once loved". There upon he relateu 
to her, much to her ammusement and 
interest, the details of his heart af- 
fair, and would have continued not 
a short time if the curtain had not 
been raised for the second act. 

As there was a very observable 
silence in the audience during the 
scenes, it was quite natural for us 
to express our opinions of the play- 
ers and their parts between these 
times. 

Sir Roger's account raised my cur- 
iosity so far when he thus gave his 
opinion concerning the Vicaress. ''I 
would not enjoy being a companion 
of that Nun, with her haughty and 
chiding manners. However it is well 
that women of that sort wish to con- 
fine themselves within convent walls, 
and thus rid the world of a few such 
displeasing characters.'' And again 
in the third act, when Teresa kissed 
the Sisters goodby he remarked that 
for the first time in his life he, too, 
wished to be in a convent. 

At the close of the play Sir Roger 
decided that, on acount of the late- 
ness of the hour, he would not at- 
tend the dance. Therefore, after our 
departure from the hall, which was 
made most amusing by the knight's 
remarks and comments to those near 
him, we bade each other a good night 
and departed to our respective places 
of lodging. 




Lebanon Valley Alumni in the 
Metropolitan area of New York were 
'delightfully entertained by Dr. Har- 
ry M. Imboden of the class of 1899 
at the Navy Young Men's Christian 
Association in the Borough of Brook- 
lyn on Saturday evening ,March 7th 
1931. Professor Stokes of the Col- 
lege was the Guest of Honor and 
made the principal address. The 
Toasmaster was Reverend George 
Mahlon Miller (1899) and reminis- 
cences of college life were given bv 
Professor Merle Hoover (1906) of 
Columbia University and Professor 
Roger Saylor (1911) of Newark Tech- 



nical School. 

Those who attended were Dr. Har- 
ry M. Imboden (1899; Reverend 
George Mahlon Miller (1899); Mrs. 
Mary Zimmerman Davis (Music) 

(1902) ; Mrs. Valeria Heiiman Kahn 
(Oratory) (1903); John F. Smith 

(1903) ; John B. Hambright (1906); 
Merle M. Hoover (1906); Miss Mabel 
S. Herr (Music) (1907); William E. 
Herr (1907); Mrs. Neda C. Knab 
Hambright (1908); Roger B. Saylor 
<1911); Mrs. Edna Kilmer Saylor 
(1912); Evan C. Brunner (1917); 
Mrs. Ada Beidler Herr (1918); Mrs. 
Jennie Sebastian Beck (1920); J. 
Dwight Daughter (1922); (Ferdinand 
L. Beck (1924); John F. Walter 
(1927); Samuel Meyer (1928); Har- 
ry R. Aungst (1929); Miss May Haul- 
er (1929) and Miles S. Kiehner 
(1929). 

The husbands and wives of those 
who are married were also in atten- 
dance. 

The following committee were ap- 
pointed to make plans for a perment 
organization of Alumni in the New 
York area: Miss May Hamer, Dr. 
H. M. Imboden, Wiliam E. Herr, Mer- 
le Hoover and Roger Saylor. 

A joint meeting of the Lebanon 
Valley College Club of Baltimore and 
the Alumni of Washington was held 
in Baltimore March 6th, 1931. The 
principal speaker of the evening was 
Liztatte Woodworth Reese, the bril- 
liant Baltimore poet. She gave a racy 
and profound talk on Life and Poet- 
ry. She also read a few of her own 
poems and told how they came to be 
composed. Other features of the 
evening were some singing and a 
few conjuring tricks. It was a most 
enthusiastic meeting. 

Dr. Walleace, Head of our Depart- 
ment was an honored guest at this 
affair. 



"Tommy Cochran '30 brought her 
little "angels" from Paradise up to 
see the game Saturday nite. Miss 
Cochran was the captain of the girl's 
team last year and is coaching the 
girl's team at Paradise, Penna. this 
year. 



There is some attraction! What- 
ever it may be, we surely were glad 
to have a few of our Alumni with 
us over the weieked. Those who hon- 
ored us with their presence were: 
Paul Barnhart '30, Blanche Cochran 
'30, Elizabeth Mathes '29, George 
Snyder '29, Oscar Stambaugh '30 and 
Bernita Strebig '30. 



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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE CO .LEGIENNE, THURSDAY. MARCH 12 1931. 



.IYLINZuEN LOSS 

TO Al*DRIuHT 

(Continued from Page 1) 



and forth throughout the first half 
with Haines and Karlip making the 
majority of their shots good while 
'Stewart and Heller were keeping 
yLebanon Valley in the running but 
oiot meeting with as much good luck 
as the visitors, many of their shots 
bounced out of the basket, accoum- 
panied by moans from loyal rooters. 
The half 'ended with Albright lead- 
ing by a score of 26-24. 

The second half was much slower 
than the first and both teams seemed 
to be tired out as a result of the 
breath-taking pace at which they 
played during the first period. 

Morrison tallied a field goal early 
in the period by tapping one of Hel- 
ler's wild ones in to tie the score. 
Haines and Karlip continued to find 
the basket keeping Albright a step 
ahead. The clever guarding of Os- 
liso combined with his floor play 
caused considerable troubile for L. 
V. C He intercepted pases time af- 
ter time again when it looked as 
though it Were impossible to prevent 
a score,. Orsino led the home team 
in scoring during the second half 
counting two field goals and a charity 
shot before he was removed via the 
personal foul route. Haines also left 
the game but he already done enough 
damage for one tilt. Heller soon 
followed when he fouled Vichery for 
his fourth. After his exit the team 
lost all spirit. Continual substitution 
could not remedy the ragged play. 
Albright continued to hold a safe 
lead but they nevter let down, they 
considered it a fight to the finish and. 
made it such. When the final shot 
fired Albright was on the big end 
of a 47-39 score. 

Karlip led the field of scorers with 
six field goals and 6 fouls for a to- 
tal of 18 ^points. Haines his team 
mate ran a close second with 6 goals 
and three fouls. Stewart and Heller: 
each had 14 points with Orsino and 
Morrison following with five and four 
respectively. Haines, Karlip and Os- 
liso were the outstanding players for 
the visitors while Stewart, Heller, 
Morrison, Orsino and M. Light held 
the limtelight for the fighting Blue 
and White. 

Albright 

G F P 
Karlip F (C) 6 6 18 

De Franco F. 5 5 

Hern |F. 

Haines C. 6 3 1 5 

Sneyttie C. 

Osliso G. 2 15 

Vichery G. 12 4 

15 17 47 
Lebanon Valley 
Stewart F. (C) 5 4 14 

Reeder F. 

Morrison F. 12 4 

S. Light F. 

Heller C. 5 4 14 

Shrom C. 

M. Light G. 2 2 

Sprenkle G. 

Frey G. 

Orsino G. 2 15 

Stone G. 

Wogan G. 

13 13 39 

Referee — Boyer. 



BUCKNELL BISONS 

DEFEATED 58-27 



(Continued from Page 1) 



and Morrison brought the opposing 
rooters to their feet. Heller's clever 
handling of the Bucknell centers al- 
so is worthy of commendation. She- 
noweth the Bison ace was lost on his 
own floor dule to the close guarding 
of M. Light and Frey. His only tal- 



lica were the results of many long 
cHgUj from the center of the floo.. 

l.e.i^j l^..d tJsg lcci'C-'j £„r *-:o 
jvening with eight field goals and 
three fculn. Stewart was a close sec- 
ond with eight field goals. Morrison 
came through and tallied six two 
poiners and one foul. Shenowith 
and Mills led the home-towners with 
six points each. This was the fast- 
est game played by the locals this 
season resulting in the highest score 
chalked-up against any opposition — 
a grand total of 58 points. 



GIRLS VICTORS 

OVER ALBRIG-I' 



Lebanon Valley 








G 


F 


P 


Stewart 


8 


o 


16 


Stone F. 











Morrison F. 


6 


1 


13 


Reeder F. 











Wogan F. 











Heller C. 


8 


3 


19 


Shrom C. 


1 





2 


M. Light G. 











Orsino G. 


1 





2 


Frey G. (C) 


2 





4 


S. Light G. 


1 





2 


Total 


27 


4 


58 


Bucknell 










G 


F 


P 


Ross F. (C) 


1 


3 


5 


Miller F. 


1 


4 


6 


Shenoweth jF. 


3 





6 


McGoldrig F. 


1 





2 


Smith C. 


1 





2 


Boyer C. 











Logan G. 











Martin G. 


1 





2 


Hepler G. 


2 





4 


Total 


10 


7 


27 



(Ccn'.Ir.ued from Page 1) 



while Kutz, of Reading was 
sible for (eight of her team's 
Lebanon Valley 
G 

Yingst R. F. 3 
Hershey L. F. 7 
Gossard C. 
Armacost S. C. 
Rupp R. G. 
Weirick L. G. 



respon- 
se ore. 



Albright 



Porter R. F. 
Reddig R. 'F. 
Kutz L. F. 
Biddle C. 
Immel S. C. 
Deck R. G. 
Krott L. G. 

Referee — Zerbie. 



G 
1 
1 
3 







F 
4 
3 







F 
3 
2 
2 







P 
10 
17 




27 

P 
5 
4 
8 




17 



SOPHS WIN AGAIN 

DEFEAT JUNIORS 



(Continued from Page 1) 



least half of the Junior passles. The 
score. 

Juniors 

G F P 
Pickle F. 12 4 




H. GOODMAN SONS 

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Ice Cream, Cakes and Pies 



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Try us for your needs 
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BOOK ENDS 

DIE STAMPED STATION- 
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LET'S GO— " 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

T ™ J* 8 . N ' 8th St - " : - Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



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Balsbaugh G. 
Thrush G. 

r.I-^usker G. 
Totals 



Sophomores 



Barnes, F. 
Clements F. 
Salada F. 
Saylor C. 
Speg G. 
Schrope G. 
Totals 



1 I 
4 o 
12 4 

10 2 
8 4 20 

G F P 

4 8 

2 2 



2 2 6 
2 4 
2 2 
8 6 22 



2 i henored 



I SEE BY THE LA VIE THAT 



A number of Junior girls of North 
[Hall had a very delightful supper 
and bridge, Thursday evening, Mar. 
5, from nine till eleven o'clock. This 
is the first "get-to-gether" of the new 
club jwhicbi the girls have named, 
"The North Hall Bridge Club". They 
intend to meet every two weeks. 
Bridge, of course, was the high light 
of the evening but the eatables were 
not slighted. Mrs. Green was the 



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. uost. The following J unioj , 
girls complied the club: Llary g^' 
fington, Eva Peck, "Charlie" Mum. 
mert, Elizabeth Flook, Ruth Artna- 
coct, Hester Thompson, Mary Rupu 
and "Betz" Engle. 



The famous Bernes twins celebrated 
their birthday last week. "Billi e » 
Coleman also had to put another can 
die on her cake. How the years flyi 
So say we all. 



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O N G R A T U LATIONS 
TO NEW "Y" 
OFFICERS! 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



WE'RE PROUD OF 
HELLER AND 
STEWART! 



yOLUME VIII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, /MARCH 19, 1931. 



No. 3 



T PRESIDENTS 
ARE ELECTED 



UND AND GELWICKS 
TO HEAD Y'S 
1931-1932 



At the election held on Wednesday, 
farch 18th, the following men were 
elected to office in the Y. M. C. A. 

President: Fred W. Mund. 

Vice-President: Chester 0. Good- 
man. 

Secretary: Samuel Ulrich. 

Treasurer: Charles Kraybill. 

Pianist: Joseph E. Rhen. 

Upon consultation with the new 
president, it was learned that the 
committee chairman will be chosen 
within the next few days. This is 
done in conference with the faculty 
advisor, and these chairmen com- 
bined with the officers will form rhe 
new cabinet. 

Y. W. ELECTIONS 

A general association meeting of 
the Y. W. C. A. was held in North 
Hall Parlor on Wednesday afternoon. 
March 11th. At this time reports 
were submitted by members of this 
year's cabinet, after which elections 
were held. Those elected to next 
year's cabinet are: President, Marie 
Gelwicks; Vice - President, Anne 
Kiehl; Recording Secretary, Naomi 
Shively; Corresponding Secretary, 
Eulalie Morton; Treasurer, Elizabeth 
Ulrich; Pianist, Ruth Coble; Day Stu- 
dent, Lucille Engl' e. The faculty ad- 
visors elected were: Madame Green, 
Mrs. Wallace, and Miss* Lietzau. 



JUNIORS DEFEATED BY 

SPEEDY SENIOR TEAM 



The last year men nosed out the 
Juniors by a score of 27-25 in a fast 
rough garni.} played Tuesday night in 
the college "coop." Football tactics 
played the major roles — the game 
was one of the roughest exhibitions 
of the sieason. 

The Seniors started at a furious 
pace, sinking several long shots from 
the center. The Junior s soon over- 
come the lead, however, and the first 
quarter ended with the score knotted 
at 10 all. 

The second quarter was as fast 
and amusing to watch as the first. 
Rank, substituting for Barnes for the 
Seniors, sank three beautiful field 
goals before he had been in the game 
five minutes, giving the "Fare- 
wellers" a safe lead for the time. 
Both teams showed signs of tiring 
and play became more ragged — the 
half ended with the Seniors leading 
20-18. 

The Juniors led by Shortlege* 
started the second half with a bang. 
They led throughout this period and 
would have increased their lead if 
"Lady Luck" had not deserted them 
and their shots. 

Salada sank two field goals in the 
final period to pull the lead down. 
Spangled then tied the scone with a 
foul shot anad later dropped in a 
field goal fo r the winning margin. 
(Continued on Page 3) 



READER'S CLUB PARTY 

DELIGHTFUL AFFAIR 



One of the most delightful affairs 
01 the season was held on Monday 
evening, March 16, when Dr. and 
Mrs. P. A. W. Wallace entertained 
t} ie miembers of the Reader's Club 
w ith a literary party at their home 
°n East Maple Street. Each of the 
Suests present was dressed in a cos- 
tume to represent some literary char- 
ter. Various novel literary games 
We *"e played, prizes being won by 
Sar a Ensminger and Gladys Hershey. 
After refreshments were served by 
* ne hostess, the remainder of the 
ev ening was spent in story telling. 
The guests received from their host 
fid hostess a souvenir of the even- 
t's entertainment, and also carried 
a *ay the sense of having spent a 
^° s t enjoyable evening. The 
fader's Club is most grateful to Dr. 
and Mrs. Wallace for their aid in 
fu rthering the literary and social 
pr °gram of the club. 



to 



Th 



ose present included Dr. and 



. rs - P. A. W. Wallace, Miss Ethel 
%ers, Sara Ensminger, Ethel 
*Wer, Ruth Shroyer, Gladys Her- 
Sl %, Betty Lefever, Margaret Lehn, 
^ ar Y Jane Eppley. Henrietta Wag- 
ner > Miriam Owen, Arline Heckrote, 
^iol a Williams, Evangeline Salorio, 
j* aul Evancoe, Robert Eshelman, 
|J Us sell Morgan, Clarence Earley, 
erc y Clements, and Edward Shellen- 
ber eer. 



DEBATERS WIN 
FOUR CONTESTS 



BOY'S NEGATIVE TEAMS 
DEFEATED AT 
ELIZ ABETHTO W N 



L. V. G. DEFEATED 
BY VIRGINIA 



HARRISONBURG VICTOR 
ONE-SIDED GAME 
53-25 



The girl's basketball team of Le- 
banon Valley College suffered a de- 
feat at the hands of the powerful 
sextette of the State Teacher's C*.l- 
lege at Harrisonburg, Virginia, Sat- 
urday evening, March 14, 1931, by 
the score of 53-25. 

The victory was decidedly Harri- 
sonburg's from the first few min- 
utes of play. Lebanon Valley found 
it difficult to get a start and at no 
time could the bunville lassies even 
threaten the Teachers. 

In the first quarter of the game 
the ball was continually in the for- 
ward territory of Harrisonburg, 
making it possible for the Virginia 
forwards to score eighteen points to 
two by Lebanon Valley's. 

The second quarter of the game 
was more exciting as each team 
scored approximately the same num- 
ber of points. However, Harrison- 
burg's lead in the first quarter raised 
her score at the end of the half to 
29 against 12 for Lebanon Valley. 

In the second half of the contest, 
Harrisonburg again showed her su- 
periority by annexing two points to 
every one point made by the Ann- 
ville forwards. The game ended 
with the score 53-25, awarding the 
victory to the Virginians. 

Yingst an dHershey, star forfards 
(Continued on Page 4) 



True to the expectations of those 
who first heard the debating teams 
in their early debases of prepara- 
tion and defeat, the debating teams 
of the boys as well as those of the 
girls have come through with vic- 
tories. The question debated in each 
instance was, "Resolved, that all the 
Nations Adopt -Free Trade." In a 
series of five debates, only one was 
lost. 

On Wednesday, 11th, the negative 
boy's team won the debate with Sus- 
quehanna at home. The spoils were 
divided on Thursday, 12th in the de- 
bates with Elizabethtown. The af- 
firmative team of the boys won at 
home, and the boys' negative team 
lost away. 

Again, on Friday both the teams 
of the girls came through with vic- 
tory over Western Maryland. The 
negative team won at hom'e, and the 
affirmative team proved victorious 
away. Thus far, the debates have 
been well attended, and this is no 
doubt due to their interesting nature. 

On Friday, 20th, there will be two 
debates with Franklin and Marshall, 
the negative team debating at home, 
and the affirmative team away. 



VARSITY TEAM PICKS 

ALL-OPPONENT FIVES 



L. V. C. HONORED 
IN BASKETBALL 



HELLER AND STEWART 
ON ALL-OPPONENT 
TEAMS 



The varsity basketball .squad me. 
Tuesday noon along with their man- 
ager, Dean Salada, and selected a 
first and second all-opponent team. 

Albright and Temple each have two 
men on the first team and one on the 
second. McCarter, flashy forward 
from St. John's, occupies the other 
berth on the first five. 

Haines and Karlip of Albright 
were elected by a large majority and 
judging from the kind of play they 
xhib^ted against us they well de- 
ceive the posts. Haines is a dead 
hot when he is within close range 
of the basket and plays a mighty fast 
floor game for a man of his size 
i;> is a dead shot and dribbles 
and shcots with great accuracy. H: 
led the scorers in the final Albright 
tilt. 

Beron and Fitch of Temple are a 
couple of lean, lanky, fast stepping 
players. (7itch plays forward and 
specializes in plain and fancy shoot 
'.ng — cnce under the basket the scorer 
may as well chalk up a two pointer 
Beron plays a great game at guard 
"ltd has a good eye for long shots 
He caused plenty of trouble and 
couldn't be stopped in the Temple 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Y.W.G.A. CABINET 
L i ENTERTAINER 



MRS. WALLACE HOSTESS 
AT LUNCHEON 
THURSDAY 



STEWART ELECTED 
BASKETBALL CAPT. 



ALSO PLAYS FOOTBALL 
AND BASEBALL 
WELL 



Twenty-three girls of the regular 
'Y.W." cabinet and the (Freshman "Y" 
cabinet, together with Madame Green 
(.and Miss Mary I. Johnson, faculty ad- 
visors of the "Y.W"., were delightfully 
entertained last Thursday evening, 
March 12, from 7:30 to 10:00 by Mrs. 
Paul A. W. Wallace, another advisor, 
at the new Colonial home of the Wal- 
ades on East Maple Street. 

The affair was in the nature of a 
buffet luncheon with the girls arranged 
at small tables of four in the living- 
room. After they had consumed as 
much as they possibly could of the de- 
licious food that Mrs. Wallace had 
prepared, they spent an hour playing 
cards and generally socializing. 

Mrs. Wallace was a most charming 
hostess, and the girls all agre'ed that 
this was one of the most delightful 
campus affairs of the year. They 
write in saying that by this alone 
they feel amply repaid for all the work 
find responsibility that cabinet mem- 
bership entails. 



Stewart and Heller were honored 
by being placed on Susquehanna's 
and F. and M.'s all opponent teams 
in recent elections. 

The Selingsgrove team chose Hel- 
ler as their best All-Opponent center 
on the first team, and Stewart as 
second string forward. Both are 
given due credit for their fine per- 
formances and are spoken of as be- 
ing "Among Pennsylvania's finest 
basket-ball players during the past 
season." 

The positions were reversed at F. 
and M. Heller was placed on the 
s'econd team being displaced by 
Haines of Albright, but Stewart was 
given the honorary first string for- 
ward post. 

These are the only reports of All- 
Opponent fives being selected by our 
opposition. If other teams did make 
such selections there is little doubt 
that L. V. C. would be well repre- 
sented. 



At a recent meeting of the varsity 
basketball team, Robert Stewart of 
York, Pa., was elected to the hon- 
orary position as capain for the past 
season. 

Stewart well deserves the honor 
bestowed upon him by his team 
mates. He played his third and best 
season at L. V. C. this year. He led 
the team in scoring with 208 points 
during the past months, being picked 
on Susquehanna's and *F. and M.'s 
all-opponent team. "Stew" will be 
with us again next season and we 
are counting on him doing his bit 
to keep L. V. C. at the head of the 
newly formed basketball league. 

Basketball is not the only sport on 
"Stew's" card. Handicapped during 
the early part of the football season 
by illness, he came out and was 
changed from a half-back to a wing 
man to replace men lost by injuries. 
As soon as spring is here to stay he 
will don the baseball togs and hold 
down a position on the college nine 
Playing short last season he met 
with fair success. This year he will 
probably foe switched to catcher to 
fill a vacancy left bv Glenn Bendigo 
two seasons ago. If he stops the 
speedy slants like he handles the 
basketball — there will be no doubt a? 
to his success. 

Hats off to Stewart! Long mav 
he remain a clean cut athlete. We 
all appreciate your services and are 
looking forward with you for a big- 
ger and better season next year. 



HISTORY CLUB PLANS 

FINE PROGRAM 



The Hitsory Club Program Com- 
mittee met recently and outlined 
chair program for the remainder of 
the year. The majority of topics are 
those concerning contemporary his- 
tory. 

March 18th: 

"The Greatest Civilization." 

1. The Ancient World.-Prof. Ohl 

2. The Middle Ages 

Prof. Stevenson 

3. The Present Prof. Gingrich 

General discussion. 

March 30th: 

"Who Should go to College?" 

1. Nearly Everybody 

Paul Emenheiser 

2. Educate a Few — and do it well 

Warren Lebo 
General discussion 
April 15th: 
"The British in India" 

1. They Should Get Out 

Alvin Kinney 

2. They should Stay In 

Dean Salada 

General discussion. 
April 22nd: 
"Shall we Recognize Soviet 
Russia?" 

1. W'e Should Martha Daley 

2. We Should Not. ..Ruth Shroyer 
General discussion. 

May 6th: 
"What About Mr. Hoover?" 

1. He is a Great Statesman 

Lolita Mumert 

2. He is a Failure 

Gladys Hershey 
General discussion. 

May 13th: 

Professor Shenk will speak on a 
topic of interest to be selected 
later. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 1931. 



Jfo lie (lalkgunnt 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



V weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL. STAFF 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 Editor-in-Chief 

Fred Mund, '32 Associate Editor 

Hilda D. Buckley, '32. .Associate iiiditor 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32 
,,, , Associate Editor 

Walter Krumbiegel, '33, 

Managing Editor 



HEI'ORTOUIAI. STAFF 
Elizabeth Ulrich, '32 
Edward Khellenberger, '33 
Edmund Umberger, '34..Gen'l Reporter 

Dorothy Garber, '32 General Reporter 

George Knowhill, '34 Conservatory 

Percy Clements, '33 Athletics 

Jane Muth, '33 uiioina.ii 

Arline lieckrote, '33 Delphian 

Clarence Earley, '33 Kalozetean 

Chester Goodman, '33 Philokosmian 

Gloria L.avanture, '33.. Alumni Iteporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Robert Rawhouser, '32, 

Business Manager 

Herman Mariano, '33, 

Ass't Business Manager 
Paul Kleinfelter, '32, 

Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English JJept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of th e Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies io cents 

Subsc ription $1.50 per y«ai 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under uie 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



HISTORY CLUB! 



Irish program. Queb e Nye acted as 
chairman. 

The first number was the history of 
St. Patrick and several interesting and 
humorous stories concerning his 
work with the Irish people. This was 
very well prepared by Marie Ehrgott. 
Next, Ethel Mae Hower gave a talk 
on "The Wearing of the Green." In 
this speech she showed that green was 
a color, not uncommon to any of the 
students, especially not to the Fresh- 
man. Alma Binner, the president of 
the society, proved her versatility by 
playing a piano solo entitled "Spring 
Song." The life of Thomas Moore and 
two of his poems "Oh! the Shamrock" 
and "The Minstrel Boy" were read by 
Edna Early. The Olive Branch 
was reviewed by Quebe Nye, whose 
selection of Irish jokes showed the 
witty nature of that nationality. 

The critic in her remarks sug- 
gested that the Olive Branch be con- 
tinued. The president appointed 
Ethel Mae Hower, editor of this 
page. You who do not know the 
nature of the Olive Branch may be 
interested to know that it is a page 
containing the humorous happenings 
and events of the week. It is read at 
the conclusion of every program. 
This ended the program which gav*> 
due credit to the Irish race. 



A few days ago a large poster 
was exhibited on the bulletin board 
in the Administration Building. As 
it was attractively printed ana 
worthy of notice, many students 
stopped for a few minutes to read the 
information. The placard was one 
showing the program of the History 
Club for the remainder of the school 
year, work which required much 
thinking on th e part of the program 
committee. The history meetings are 
held every two weeks and for teach 
date an interesting and instructive 
debate has been arranged. 

The History Club, although an in- 
fant organization on the campus, de- 
serves much credit for its work so 
far. Many current tid-bits and high 
lights on present day topics have been 
discussed which otherwise would be 
overlooked by the student. The Club 
aims to develop an (enthusiasm for 
history in the young men and women. 
So far thi syear the club has not 
been operating to any great extent 
due to the great number of other ac- 
tivities. However, this carefully 
planned program shows that the of- 
ficers of the organization are anx- 
ious to stir up some real interest in 
the group. Th e club is indeed worth- 
while; the meetings are educational 
and also provide a means for social- 
izing. Let's support the History 
Club and attend the meetings. It 
will be gratifying to the speakers to 
see that the students want to hear 
them. Also the faculty advisor and 
officers will feel amply repaid for 
endeavoring to band together the 
history addicts. Let's give ourselves 
a holiday from our usual work and 
routine and visit the next History 
Club meeting. The club will be glad 
to have us and the program will be 
worth the effort we put forth in at- 
tending. 

Let's be boosters — boost the club 
for it is seriously trying to make 
itself a living force on the campus 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



The regular meeting of Delphian 
Literary Society was held on Friday, 
March 13, with the Sophomore girls 
in charge. 

After devotions conducted by the 
chaplain, Marie Gelwicks the Del- 
phians were introduced to the salon 
of Madame "Billy" Coleman, where 
the newest of spring fashions were! 
displayed. While Leona Allen at the 
piano softly played the newest jazzy 
tunes. "Billy" ushered in her models. 
Beautiful lingerie was first displayed, 
n rd then clever pajamas, both for 
b-ach and formal wear. Sports 
came next, and complete outfits for 
swimming, golf, tennis, motoring, 
yachting, and riding wer e charmingly 
shown bv the various models. After 
i brief intermission during which 
Leona entertained by singing popular 
~ongs, the fasihon show was resumed. 
Lcvely afternoon frocks delighted 
everyone, end also the chic town 
dresses and hats. The last display 
wps of spring evening gowns and 
wraps, after which "Billy" closed 
He* salon until a later showing. The 
models fo r the displa v were Ma-ion 
Kruger, Agusta Traehte, Helen 
^-anklin. Luella Heilman, Harriet 
Miller, Mildred Christman, and Arline 
TJf eckrote. 

Elizabeth Ulrich, critic, gave her 
report, after which a short business 
meeting was held. The society then 
adjourned. 



we're all acquainted with the line be- 
ginning "Now when I was a Fresh- 
man — ." The appropriate subject "Be- 
ware the Ides of March" was given to 
Clinton Allen in the absence of Mr. 
Whistler. Mr. Allen's talk proved 
to be the funniest on the program. He 
kept his audience in spasms of 
laug-hter. 

The impromptu speakers were Mr. 
Christman, Mr. Mund, and Mr. Myers. 
Mr. Christman, speaking of "Star 
Gazing" dwelt on the pleasantness of 
this occupation, especially to a young- 
couple on a Spring evening. Mr. Mund 
gave a unique description of the symp- 
toms of "Spring Fever." Mr. Myers 
told why he took Physics in High 
School. 

After a general criticism by Mr. 
Wise, the society was listening to the 
propositions of several men displaying 
favors. Suddenly a bat fiew into the 
hall. Whether it was an ill omen or 
not, no one knew, but everyone armed 
himself with a broom or a song book 
and took his turn beating the air as 
the bat flew near. Excitement was at 
a high pitch until the bat flew over 
into the Biology Museum, where it 
probably found relatives. Order was 
soon restored, and after the business 
was finished, the meeting adjourned. 



tournament. A straw vote was taken 
and it was found that two-thirds of 
our boys can "shuffle the deck" and 
things certainly look promising for 
the high score holders. 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



Franklin and Marshall college, we 
read, will next year become the 
Freshman's paradise*. The college, 
with the consent and approval of the 
faculty, has abolished all first year 
regulations except those concerning 
the dink, the tie, and the identifica- 
tion badge which is worn the first 
few weeks. We wonder what the ef- 
fect on the lucky plebes will be. 



lived alone in an old house on a 
most priceless plot of New York* aL 
estate. On her death last t^J" 6 ' 1 
was announced that the whole t ^ 
tune would go to various chanV 
Old Johann Wendel, as he was a 
sing his wealth, probably ^ 
dreamed that this would be th> 7^ 
of his fortune. ~ ate 



The police in that staid villag 
Chicago were given a thrill 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



In the regular business meeting of 
the Clionian Literary Society, plans 
for the joint session with the Philo- 
homions were discussed. 

The chaplain led in devotions and in 
the singing of several Irish songs. The 
Senior girls then entertained with an 



The members of the Philokosmian 
pterary Society enjoyed an interest- 
ing program on Friday, March 13. 
Francis Barr presided and Chester 
Goodman led in devotions. Messrs. 
Christman, Dellinger, Goodman, apd 
Howard were installed in the posi- 
tions of judge, editor, chaplain, and 
seargent-at-arms, respectively. 

"Talk" was the subject of a speech 
delivered by Mr. Goodman. He ex- 
plained the importance of talk in our 
daily life and told how we can im- 
prove ourselves along this line. 
Three new members furnished the 
musical entertainment for the even- 
ing. Donald Shope rendered a saxo- 
phone solo, accompanied by Joe 
Rhen. A vocal solo was sung by 
Allen Ranck, also accompanied by 
Mr. Rhen. 

Woodrow Dellinger, substituting 
for Mr. Whistler, ably spoke on the 
subject "Reminiscing." Of course 



The Kalozetean Literary Society 
did not hold its Literary session on 
Friday night. An informal gather- 
ing replaced the regular meeting 
after the college debate. Radio 
music and bridge playing until a 
late hour furnished the youths with 
entertainment. A short impromptu 
debate was given on "The Evils of 
the World." "Ike" Grant and Joe 
Hutchinson on the positive side while 
"Sergeant" Long and Walter Krum- 
bright rendered the negative side. 
The judges were Earl Fry. Percy 
Clements and Alvin Kinney. The 
decision of the judges was a draw. 
Howls of merriment rent the air as 
the different points from 'each side 
were given. "Babe" Earley presided 
as chairman. The Kalo's showed 
their real versatile talent in debating 
and I'm sure Prof. Stokes missed 
some good material when these boys 
passed up the Varsity Debating team. 

Plans for the Anniversary wene 
also discussed. The program and 
seating committees have marshalled 
their jFreshman usher force and 
"consideration and courtesy" is their 
motto. This year in Kalo's Fifty- 
fourth Anniversary; it will surpass 
all other social events that have been 
held on the campus, and will remain 
as a high mark for all other societies 
to shoot at. 

Oh, co-eds, co-eds, what crimes 
have been committed in thy name. 
What the poor boys have been suf- 
fering, all on account of you innocent 
females. Every night for the past 
week has found all brave-hearted 
boys over at Kalo, dragging their 
weary feet around in incomprehen- 
sible mazes in a stern effort to mas- 
ter the fox-trot, "Harvard hop" and 
the "Emeigh Teck Swing." Sh-s s s, 
you see it's only a matter of days 
until the big date is here for Kalo's 
birthday and the boys want to sur- 
prise their "sweet mammas" by ask- 
ing them to the dinner dance at the 
Penn Harris. If yo u listen closely any 
night you can hear the blare of a 
jazzy band and Joe Hutchinson 
counting one, two, three,— one, two, 
three, as his weary dancing class 
clench their fists and curse their 
lower anatomy. 

Bang! and Kalo's off again! This 
time we are going to run a bridge 



Dr. Ales Hrdlicka, a noted anthro- 
pologist, tells us that the tendency of 
babies to walk about on all fours is 
a weakened but still a continued in- 
heritance from the prehuman past. 
He claims that such infants show 
tokens of health, sturdiness, and life 
assurance. If you look up your baby 
pictures, there might be cause for 
much rejoicing. 




The business depression, we are 

told, has caused a decrease of a 
hundred million dollars in the gov- 
ernment receipts from income taxes. 
This will be a partial cause of the 
estimated half billion dollar deficit 
that our government expects to face 
on June 20. 



Madame Greene, Miss Litzau and 
Professor Stokes visited Miss Yvonne 
Greene at her apartment in Balti- 
more on Saturday. 

Miss Yvonne Grdene is attending 
Johns Hopkin's University at Balti- 
more. 



The Nautilus, Sir Hubert Wilkins' 
polar-exploring submarine, has left 
Philadelphia on the first leg of its 
voyage to the arctic regions. While 
in the North, Sir Hubert hopes to de- 
termine the exact effects which polar 
phenomena have on weather condi- 
tions in the rest of the world. He 
also intends to prepare some much- 
needed maps and charts, and to test 
the efficiency of the new gyro-com- 
pass when near the North pole. 



Mrs. Samuel Saylor was at home to 
the faculty, Wednesday evening 
March 11, 1931. 

The house was beautifully decor- 
ated with lovely spring floWers. 

After a most sumptuous dinner 
they retired to the library where they 
had coffee. 

/Following this there were four 
tables of Bridge in the drawing 
room. 



Y. W.-Y. M. NOTES 



Eugene O'Neill is being sued by 
Miss Georges Lewys because of al- 
leged plagarism. Miss Lewys claims 
that O'Neill pirated his ideas for 
"The Strange Interlude" from her 
novel, "The Temple of Pallas 
Athens." In defense, O'Neill has se- 
cured as a witness his friend, George 
Jean Nathan. So that high-browed 
New York critic must attend one 
show that he can't walk out on. 



Eighteen hundred editors, pub- 
lishers, and writers of seven hundred 
newspapers printed in schools and 
colleges throughout the country are 
gathered at Columbia Universitp in 
New York. Arthur Brisbane, who so 
scintillatingly adorns the columning 
"profession", says that the editorials 
of college newspapers are in a posi- 
tion to be among the most useful in 
journalism because "they reach the 
young mind while it is open to new 
ideas." 



One of the nation's oldest and 
greatest fortunes is at last to be dis- 
solved. Over a hundred years ago, 
Johann Wendel amassed a large for- 
une through his activities in the 
pioneer work of the fur industry. 
This great wealth descended intact 
to his children and finally rested in 
the hands of his seven grandchildren. 
These queer people hoarded this pile 
of money, at one time over $100,000,- 
000, and as, on e by one, they died 
off childless, their individual shares 
accumulated in the hands of the sur- 
vivors. Finally the whoDe fortune 
was in the possession of Miss Ella 
Wendel, the last of the family, who 



The Y. W. C. A. Friendly Hour 
Service on Sunday evening was in 
charge of the cabinet, and led by Sara 
Ensminger. 

For devotions Ruth Coble read a 
selection from a devotional book, 
"Streams in the Desert. The central 
thought of the reading was that we 
should be willing to be a "voice in 
the wilderness," and to "bear witness 
to the light," and that God's most 
faithful workers are often called 
from the unknown multitude. Mary 
Buffington and Mildred Christiansen, 
accompanied by Leona Allen, ren- 
dered a vocal duet, "Now the Day is 
Over." Elizabeth Ulrich reported 011 
an article, "Out of the Lives of Men 
from Far Horizons," in which brief 
sketches of the work of the educa- 
tional, the evangelical and the 
medical missionaries were given. * 
piano solo, "Minuetto" by Beethoven, 
was given by Eulalie Morton. Na- 
omi Shively gave a brief talk 
"Getting Acquainted with Jesus,' 
which it was emphasized that 
should make as many contacts, fe? 
phases of our lives, as possible wit 
Tesus, in order to know him fully- 
The meeting was brought to a close 
with the singing of "Follow 
Gleam," and with the usie of 
Mizpah Benediction. 



on 
' in 
we 
all 
ith 



the 
the 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



:e of 

Dr. Edwin Reynolds reported that 611 
thief had stolen his automobil* i 
which contained enough phials f ^' 
phoid fever and smallpox germs f 
start a serious epidemic of e j t v 
disease. What is it, another racket? 



Thursday, March 19 — Mrs. 
sard's tea to the Sophomore % 

Friday, March 20 — Commerce 
dinner, 5:30. 

Sunday, March 21— Y. W. C - 
Friendly Hour, 5:30, 



Gos- 
iris- 
Cl« b 



Wednesday, 
bate. L. V, 
qu'ehanna. 



March 25— Men's 



vs. Susquehanna 



at S*S' 



i 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 1931. 



PAGE THREE 



ling 
alti- 



mer 
they I 

four 
ving 



lour 
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id a 
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t we 
e in 
;nes>3 
most 
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Vtary 
isen, 

ly is 
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luca- 
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Go?' 
rls- 
Cl« b 

i A- 




Ye writer has been collecting sta- 
tistics again. A survey conducted 
among the "Frosh" of the college 
during the past week produced the 
following astonishing results. The 
class has an aggregate weight of six- 
teen tons. If sold as junk or fer- 
tilizer, they would bring about $5.98. 
The average height is five feet, ten 
inches. If they were placed end to 
end they would reach over a half 
mile in any direction except towards 
the cemetery. 



Mund: Don't go. You are leaving 
m'e entirely without reason. 

Sara: I always leave things as I 
find them. 



Dean: I hear she's quite economical 
with her kisses. 

Skee: Yeah, she makes one last an 
awfully long time. 



Zech: Where'd you get that bump? 
Chet: I was in an argument. 
Zech: Poker? 
Chet: No, she poked me. 



Prof.: Will your parents be sur- 
prised when you graduate? 

Stud: Nope, they've been expecting 
it for many years. 



Kit: What will the modern girl be 
twenty years from now ? 

Sonny: Oh, about three years 
older. 



Stew: What's on the radio? 
Red: Oh, just a little dust. 



Flooky: I didn't know she was in 
school this year. 

Hester: Oh yes — cats always come 
back. 



Are you a friend of the groom? 

Lady: No indeed \ I'm the bride's 
mother. 



Ko-eds report that an empty stock- 
ing may bring gifts on Xmas day, 
but a well filled one brings them any 
day. 



I tell you, pal, I believe that every 
man should have a wife, preferably 
his own. . 



Phil: How come you always carry 
that satchel with you? 

Bill: I'm in the secret service now. 
J' 11 * a bootlegger. 



Mr. Hall: What do you want? 

Dellinger: I want a soda. 

Mr. Hall: Yeh, soda the rest of us. 



The fellow who blows hot and then 
blows cold doesn't belong in a jazz 
fenestra. 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



The Ides of March! The good oY 
j* es ! Bringing with it snow, rain, 
Jket, chill Mains, "Codes in di 
^odse!" gum boots, slickers, snow- 
a Us, wet feet and mustard plasters. 
The Campus this morning must 
av e been an inspiration to anyone 
^ ltn a poetic turn of mind. The 
r ees reminded one of descriptions of 
Pine scenery. Arousing the sense 
beauty to ecstasy! In spite of 
I have said about the beauties of 
ure y° u cannot get very poetical 
^ h en a big chunk of snow lazily 
°Ps off a telephone pole odwn your 



neck. It has a natural power to bring 
one back to earth. 

This sudden squall of snow has 
ruined everything. Base ball men 
have again put gloves, bats and slid- 
ing pads back into dusty trunks laden 
with moth balls. The joyously shed 
"great Coats" have been donned with 
many a sigh and harsh adjectives 
against the fickleness of Dame Na- 
ture. Fred Christman's home pruned 
nose fern has a drooping atmosphere 
about it. 

I have been grossly accused of 
"Hoopleism"! I fear wrongly ac- 
cused. I have been for the past 
month trying to arouse some interest 
in a Junior Prom, to little or no avail, 
vainly trying to kindle the spark of 
enthusiasm within the breasts of a 
dormant audience! Now some one ac- 
cuses me of having ''an axe to 
grind!" With this accusation I throw 
up the sponge and take my place in 
the ranks of the jealous hearted and 
selfish! 

I learned last week that a cat 
hasn't nine lives \ Not when you try 
to chloroform one with Benzine! 
For demonstration see either Jim 
Monteith or Ray Pickel! 

I have been requested nay, 

ordered to leave the name of 

mister r. e. dennis out of this col- 
umn. I remonstrated with him, even 
pleaded, but all to no avail, mr. 
dennis wants no more publicity and 
that's the end of another prolific 
source of snappy stories. 

I may have to fall back on my old 
friend J. W. Light for material with 
which to fashion these delicate gon- 
gorisms 

And if you don't think kthat's the 
proper word to use, look it up in 
Webster's Best and see for yourself. 
There's no reason why I should con- 
fine my remarks in this space to trite 
and exoterical phrases just to please 
r. e. dennis, who doesn't possess a 
dictionary. 

Now comes the Listerine song: 
"Just a Gargilo!" 

Joseph Hutchinson whose only dis- 
tinguishment is that of being the 
room mate of Ike. Grant, blossoms 
forth with a name for this column. 
Joe says "Tid-Bits" would be a suit- 
able monicker! I'll bet I get a name 
for this "dern thing" yet! Have you 
sent your in? 

DID YOU KNOW THAT: 

John Hughes can be heard eleven 
miles, seven rods, forty-five feet and 
three centometers on a clear day! 

After Kalo. initiation Bill Brown 
is going in for Gymnastics! 

Joe Wood is a strong follower of 
Earle Leiderman! 

Bill Fishburn is taking toe-dancing 
lessons! 

"Dutch" Brubaker has a tough 
time with De r Dutche! 



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Booklets, Etc. 

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Service, Workmanship and Materials 
Hand Stitching 

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ANNVILLE, PA. 



Oley Orsino at one time considered 
a stage career! 

Prof. Wagner spent fourteen 
months in th e Aviation Corps! 

Murph. Kazulsky doesn't like to 
tend babies! 

The "quittie" needs suscriptions ! 

There will be no classes July 4! 

Gem Gemmel gets afraid. Not in 
the dark either! 

Roy Lechthaler's middle name is 
Melvin! 

Kit. Yingst gets angry when the 
ball fails to go through the hoop! 

Ruth Armsost is ticklish! 

Dr. Gossard. Prof. Gingrich and 
Prof. Butterwick got sea-sick on a 
fishing expedition! 

This column don't amount to much! 

The author is superstitious and 
feeble-minded! 

This thing has gone far enough! 
So long. 

0. H. S. 



JUNIORS DEFEATED BY 
SPEEDY SENIOR TEAM 

(Continued from Page 1) 



The play of Shortlege was the fea- 
ture of the tilt. He scored nine 
points and his floor play deserves 
credit. Hughes ran a close second 
with six points for the Juniors. Wood 
and Rank were leading scorers for 
the Seniors, each having six points. 

The final game will be played next 
week between the Sophs and Seniors. 
Get your dimes together and witness 
a real game. The Sophs lost to the 
Seniors earlier in the season but their 
play in reecnt games shows much 
improvement. — All out for the "ice 
box" festival. May the luckiest team 
win! 

Box Score: 

SENIORS G. F. P. 

Rugh, F 2 4 

Patrizio, F 10 4 

Salada, F 2 4 

Barnes, C 

Rank, C 3 6 

Spangler, G 13 5 

Wood, G 2 2 6 

Total 11 5 27 

JUNIORS G. DP. P- 

Hughes, F 2 2 6 

Pichel, F 2 2 

Saleh, C - 1 1 3 

KoMer, C 

Shortlege, G 3 3 9 

McCusher, G 2 15 

Total 8 9 25 



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• • • 



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fJMoiher and ^Dad 

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YOU DON'T NEED 

a shave — or a haircut 
or a stiff-bosomed shirt! 

You don't have to dress up to 
pay a voice visit back home. 

Just go to the nearest telephone 
— give your home telephone num- 
ber to the Operator — and ex- 
change news of the campus for 
news of home. 

Make it a habit. Telephone home 
every week. The cost is low — 
and charges can be reversed if 
you wish. 





PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 1931. 



L. V. C. DEFEATED 

BY VIRGINIA 



(Continued from Page 1) 



for Lebanon Valley, made some good 
shots, usually succeeding in getting 
two points whenever the ball came 
their way which was not very often. 

There were no outstanding players 
on the Harrisonburg team for each 
player was especially good and the 
team-work was exceptional. One in- 
teresting feature of the shooting of 
the Harrisonburg forwards was that 
only shots were attempted when the 
fojrwardis (were directly under the 
basket. Sullivan was high scorer for 
Harrisonburg, annexing twenty- 
seven points for her team while 
Yingst scored fourteen points for 
Lebanon Valley. 

Line up: 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. Total 

Yingst, R. F 5 4 14 

Hershey, L. F 4 3 11 

Gossard, C. 
Engle, C. 
Armaoost, S. C. 
Rupp, R. G. 
Brant, R. G. 
Weirick, L. G. 



25 

HARRISONBURG 

G. F. Total 

Sullivan, R. F 13 1 27 

Bones, R. F Oil 

Johnston, L. F 3 6 

Hobbs, L. F 9 1 19 

Nebbett, C. 
English, C. 
Ralston, S. C. 
Leith, S. C. 
Duke, R. G. 
Coyner, L. G. 
Farinholt, L. G. 



53 

Referee: Fogg of Sweetbriar Col- 
lege. 



VARSITY TEAM PICKS 

ALL-OPPONENT FIVES 

(Continued from Page 1) 



game early in the season. Both of 
these Temple lads will be back next 
year and if nothing happens, our first 
game will be against tb3 Owls. They 
bear watching because they are twc 
of the east's best basket-ball players. 

The second team consists of some 
mighty fine players displaced from 
the first five because of their play 
against Lebanon Valley. These se- 
lections are based only on their in- 
dividual showings against the home 
team. Other selections were not con- 
sidered. DeFranco of Albright and 
Lodge of Ursinus hold down the for- 
ward posts with Gudd of Temple at 
center. Glenn of Susquehanna and 
Horst of F. and M. turned in the next 
best guard play agaist L. V. C. 

Both teams and their respective 
schools are as follows: 
FIRST TEAM 
Fitch (Temple) Forward 
McCartie (St. John's) {Forward 
Hairies (Albright) Center 
Karlip (Albright) Guard 
Beron (Temple) Guard 
SECOND TEAM 
Lodge (Ursinus) Forward 
DeFranco (Albright) Forward 
Gudd (Temple) Center 
Glenn (Susquehanna) Guard 
Horst ((F. and M.) Guard 



HISTORY CLUB MEETS 



At the meeting of the History 
Club, Wednesday evening, March 18, 
in Kalo Hall, there was an unusually 
interesting program presented. The 
question under consideration was — 
"Which is the Greatest Civilization?" 

Ancient civilization was capably 
reviewed by Prof. Ohl. Prof. Steven- 



son in his talk on Medieval civiliza- 
tion, expressed a desire to have lived 
in the romantic period of the Middle 
Ages. Whereas Prof. Gingrich hu- 
morously brought out some of the 
sidelights of modern civilization. 

The fact that there was an un- 
usually large attendance indicates 
the degree of interest that is being 
shown by this acive club, which 
proves that it is more than a mere 
name on the campus. 



LIFE WORK RECRUITS 
HOLD MEETING 



A meeting of the Life Work Re- 
cruits was held on Thursday, Febru- 
ary 12, with Ruth Liller presiding. 
Stuart Werner led in the devotions. 

Fred Mund displayed his latest 
tal'ent by playing an accordian solo. 
He played a medley of old hymns 
which were much appreciated by all 
those present. 

Miss Ethel May Hower was the 
speaker of the (evening. Her subject 
was "Philosophy and Religion." She 
traced the history of Philosophy and 
gave the theories of several philoso- 
phers. She also showed how the 
Harms are distinguished from each 
other. Following her talk the regular 
discussion was held. 

After a short business session, the 
meeting was adjourned. 

On Monday evening, March 16, 
the Life Work Recruits w*are guests 
of Dr. C. A. Lynch, representing 
Bonebrake Seminary, at a banquet 
held in the Pennway Hotel. Dr. and 
Mrs. R. R. Butterwick, Dr. and Mrs. 



Jones, and Prof. J. Bruce Behney 
were guests of honor. 

Mr Paul. Emenheiser acted as 
toastmaster for the occasion. Spicy 
after-dinner speeches werti delivered 
by Dr. Butterwick, Prof. Behney, and 
Dr. Jones. Messrs. Ray Harris, Fred 
Mund, Edward Shellenberger, and 
Melvin Hitz, representing the four 
college classes, offered greetings. 

Dr. Lynch closed with a few re- 
marks. His week-end visit has proved 
successful in helping som'3 of the 
ministerial students with their prob- 
lems especially as regards attending 
seminary, and in strengthening the 
ties between Bonebrake Seminary 
and Lebanon Valley College. 



A-l SKTJL, 
WOMSWMBERS 




BEFORE 



ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 

207 W. Main 



TRIP TO VIRGINIA 

ENJOYED BY GIRLS 



The girl's basketball team of Le- 
banon Valley College is loud in its 
praise of the Virginia trip which it 
made oVer the week-end. 

Leaving (Friday noon, March 13, 
the girls travelled by car to Har- 
risonburg, Virginia, where they were 
guests at the State Teacher's Col- 
lege located there. The southern 
girls were particularly hospitable and 
friendly to the L. V. C. maidens and 
proved to be delightful entertainers. 
Ten o'clock found the Annville las- 
sies very tired and bed was most 
welcome. 

On Saturday morning, the team of 



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Ice Cream, Cakes and Pies 



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RINGS 

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LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 

Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



GET OUR RATES ON SPECIAL BANQUETS 
AND DINNERS 

The Pennway 

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L. V. C. practiced in the large gym- 
nasium at the college, in order to be 
in trim for the game in the evening. 

As Virginia is the home of the 
Natural Caverns, the girls took ad- 
vantage of the trip and spent an in- 
structive hour going through the 
Massanutten Caverns, which ana 
only five miles distant from Har- 
risonburg. For most of the party 
it was a rare treat as the Caverns 
are truly remarkable. 

After the visit to the Caverns, sev- 
eral of the girls took a dip in the 
large indoor pool of which the col- 
lege boasts. The weather was de- 
cidedly much warmer in Virginia 
than it is in Pennsylvania at the 
present time. 

After the gam£ Saturday even- 
ing, the girls of the State Teacher's 
College tendered a reception to hter 
guests which they greatly enjoyed. 

Sunday morning found the Travel- 
lers headed north. From Harrison- 
burg the team journeyed to Washing- 
ton, D. C, where the co-eds took in 
the sights of the Capital City. About 



half of the number visited the CapJ, 
tal Building and noted especially the 
new contributions of the present 
artist employed by the government. 
The entire party was disappointed at 
not being able to enjoy the sights at 
Mount Vernon as the >estate was 
closed for the day. 

The girls arrived home late Sunday 
evening, tired and sleepy but voting 
it a most successful trip. 



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When you want work 
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lalfieCflll^iennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



BEST OF LUCK 



TO KALO ! 



VOLUME VIII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 1931. 



No. 4 



F.&M. DEBATERS 
VICTORIOUS 

V. MEN LOSE IN 
CLOSE CONTESTS 
2- 1 



The men's debating teams of Le- 
banon Valley College lost a pair of 
close, hard-fought debates when 
they encountered the Franklin and 
Marshall teams last Friday evening. 
The debate at Annville attracted one 
of the largest audiences of the year, 
thus showing the lively interest 
aroused by the question: Resolved, 
"That the nations adopt a policy of 
free trade." 

The Lebanon Valley men, Gilbert 
Mariano, Herman Mariano, and Rus- 
sel Etter, ably supported the negative 
side against the (F. and M. affirma- 
tive team, which was composed of 
Messrs, Emily Nagy, Twittmeyer, 
and John Dotterer. The judges, Col. 
M. L. Case, Mr. D. S. Hammond, and 
Rev. J. L. Hynson, returned a two 
to one verdict in favor of the visiting 
debaters;. j 

At Lancaster, the Lebanon Valley 
affirmative debaters, Gerald Heilman, 
Robert Womer, Edmund Umberger, 
and Edward Shellenberger, argued 
against the F. and M. protectionist 
element, represented by A. E. Mc- 
Collough, C. F. Foltz, Jr., and A. B. 
Herr. The judges decided by a mar- 
gin of one vote in favor of the nega- 
tive side. 

Th e Franklin and Marshall teams 
were among the best that our men 
have met this year. However, the 
Lebanon Valley forensic gladiators 
ar e not dismayed and hope to return 
to their winning streak in the debates 
scheduled for the remainder of the 
season. 



KALO DINNER DANCE 

PENN HARRIS HOTEL 



Plans are nearing completion for 
f he biggest and best anniversary 
celebration ev^r attempted by the 
Kalozetean Literary Society. Break- 
ln £ awa y from the traditional Satur- 
da y Evening Play, Kalo will this 
year present Shaw's "Androcles and 
th e Lion" on Friday, March 27. 

°n Saturday, March 28, the first 
Ar *nual Dinner Dance will be held 
the Penn-Harris Hotel in Harris- 
, Ur g, the music for the eevning be- 
l ng furnished by Brownagles Record- 
t? 0rcnestra - This formal affair is 
L he first of its kind to be held on 
t _ e hanon Valley Campus in celebra- 
° n of the anniversary of a Literary 



So, 



ciety. 



^nt 
ar 6 



^ Kalos both of the present stu- 



hody and the active alumni, 
^ supporting the event whole 
^artedly, and it is expected that this 
will be one of the finest ever 
eld hy the school. 



Y.M.C.A. CABINET 

APPOINTMENTS 

After consultation with the faculty 
advisor, Dr. Butterwick, Fred Y. 
Mund, the new Y.M.C.A. president, 
announces the appointees on his cabi- 
net. The committee chairmen are 
as follows: 

World Fellowship .... Paul Kleinfelter 

Social r George Nye 

Ray Pickle 

Devotional Paul Emenheiser 

Publicity Allen Buzzel 

Freshman Cabinet Paul Keene 

Properties John Morris 

Program Alvin Kinney 

This line-up promises a successful 
year for Y.M.C.A. work on the cam- 
pus. Interest in the general "Y" 
work, and application to the work as- 
signed, constitute the requirements 
for maintaining one's position on the 
cabinet. The first real training for 
the entire group will be obtained 
when the State Convention is held 
on our compus, April 23, 24, 25, and 
26th, 1931. Robert Roudabush, who 
is planning this conference in con- 
junction with the State Y. M. C. A. 
leaders, will divulge the complete 
plans for the conference in the near 
future. 

In addition to the regularly elected 
officers of th e Y.W.C.A., the ap- 
pointed members of the cabinet have 
been chosen by Miss Marie Gel- 
wicks, the new president. They are 
asfollows: Program, Henrietta Wag- 
ner; Social, Mildred Christiansen; 
World Fellowship, Mary Buffington; 
Devotional, Luella eHilman; Proper- 
ties, Dorothy Barber; Freshman 
Commission, Kathryn Mowry. 



SENIORS VICTORS 
OVER SOPHS 

SOPHS LEAD AT START 
BUT WEAKEN IN 
SECOND HALF 



By defeating the Sophs in a hard 
fought battle in the Alumni Gym 
Tuesday night by a score of 37-30, 
the Seniors won the interclass bas- 
ketball title for the year. 

The game was fast rfom the very 
first with each team trying hard to 
establish a lead. The Seniors drew 
fifrst blood when Wood sank two 
charity shots after having been foul- 
ed by Baines. The Sophs soon came 
back however, and three successive 
field goals by iBaines, Saylor and 
Speg put them well in front. The 
game was nip and tuck during the 
entire first half— the Sophs holding a 
slight edge with their passing at- 
tack and shotting. Rough plays 
served as a stimulant to urge the 
players on — Clements of the Sophs 
drew four successive fouls in the 
second quarter to go out via the per- 
sonal route. The half ended with the 
score 17-13, the second year man on 
the big end. 

The second half was faster than 
the first but the rough Senior five 
completely outplayed the tearing 
Sophs quintet. Due to the shooting 
of Wood and Rank the Sophs lead 
(Continued on Page 4) 



SINNER CHOSEN 
MAY QUEEN 

STAGER MAID OF HONOR 
PLANS FOR FETE 
BEGUN 



With the appearance of the robins 
and various other signs of spring on 
the campus, thoughts of May Day 
presented themselves. Plans for 
this annual fete were begun last 
Thursday morning in chapel, when 
the election of this year's May 
<Jueen and her court was held. Alma 
Binner was the member of the Sen- 
ior class who received the special 
honor of being chosen as May Queen. 
Miss Binner is a graduate of the Le- 
banon High School of the class of 
1927. During her first three college 
years, she was numbered among the 
day students. Consequently, it was 
not until this year that the day stu- 
dents learned to really know her. In 
a short time, by means of her quiet, 
modest manner and pleasing person- 
ality, she had won her way into the 
hearts of all who came in contact 
with her. Mary Stager, also of Le- 
banon, was selected as Maid of 
Honor. The following girls were 
elected to the Queen's Court: Caro- 
line Fisher, Dorothy Hafer, Ruth 
Liller, Margaret Light, Dorothy 
Thompson, Margaret Young. 



SOPHOMORE GIRLS 

GUESTS AT TEA 



Mrs. G. D. Gossard very charm- 
ingly entertained the girls of the 
Sophomore Class at bridge and a tea 
in her home on Thursday afternoon, 
Farch 19. The guests enjoyed a pro- 
gram wihch was presented by their 
class cousins, the Seniors. The first 
mother was a piano solo by Margaret 
Young. A vocal solo by Dorothy 
Hafer followed this. Caroline Fisher 
entertained with a recitation, which 
was very pleasing to her listeners. 
The concluding feature of the pro- 
gram was several charades, which 
were splendidly enacted by the Senior 
girls, and which aroused a great 
deal of interest. The girls then in- 
dulged in bridge until the serving of 
the. delicious refreshments by the 
Senior girls, with Caroline Fisher and 
Dorothy Hafer pouring. 



REFRESHMENTS FEATURE 
GERMAN CLUB MEETING 



The German Club held its bi- 
monthly meeting on Tuesday even- 
ing, March 24, at 7:30, in South Hall 
Parlor. An interesting program was 
presented. A Chinese Poem, trans- 
lated into German, was given by 
Luella Umberger; piano duets were 
rendered by Dorothy Snyder and 
Alma Binner; Edna Early recited a 
Child's Poem. The program was 
concluded with jokes and humor by 
Margaret Paris. After the business 
meeting Miss Lietzan served re- 
freshments. 



BOOST THE "QUITTIE" 

ORDER YOURS NOW 



There's a grinding of broad-tired 
wheels, oxen are straining in the for- 
ward movement, the canvas of the 
covered wagon flaps in the midst of 
the chattels, the men on horseback 
are on the lookout for Indians. The 
pioneers are going westward. They 
are paving the way for expansion in 
a new country. The hardships are 
innumerable, and the risk is. great, 
yet on and on they press. Through 
these enterprising spirits shall the 
territories of a great nation be 
..cunded out, and their children shall 
reap untold benefits. 

The rise of a college is similar to 
the rise of a nation. Pioneers have 
gone before. They have given their 
best years for such a college as we 
Slow inherit. Lebanon Valley College 
has had a glorious past, and com- 
parable to the best. It has been due 
:o the untiring effort and consecrated 
zeal of her pioneers — her men of 
vision. 

With such a background in mind, 
the Junior Class dedicates its "Quit- 
tie" to the Pioneers of our college. 
An immense amount of labor has 
gone into this book. Its features are 
interestingly original, and it will be 
far above mediocrity. The art work 
embodied in the various designs, 
borders and features all points 
toward the one theme, "Pioneer." It 
will be a treasure to every person 
who obtains one. Although it is 
dedicated to those who have blazed 
the trail in the past, it is strikingly 
progressive in outlook. It is not only 
a dedication but also an inspiration. 
No student should be without one. 
The pleasures accrued as a result of 
having one will far exceed the mone- 
tary outlay. Now, let's get, behind 
the Juniors in their great work, and 

make it a year in which every man 

« 

owns a "Quittie. ' 



INSTALLATION 
OF T OFFICERS 



NEW OFFICERS ACCEPT 
CHALLENGE OF 
"Y" WORK 



The entire student body had the 
opportunity to witnes a most impres- 
sive ceremony on Thursday morning, 
March 26, during the regular chapei 
period, at which time the installa- 
tion of the new Y.W. and Y.M. cabi- 
nets took place. After an organ pre- 
lude and a hymn, "A Charge to Keep 
I have," the Scripture lesson was 
read by Fred Christman, the retiring 
Y.M. president, followed by a prayer 
led by Miss Sarah Ensminger, the re- 
tiring Y.W. president. A beautiful 
vocal duet, "My Task," sung by Earl 
Wolfe and Miss Hester Thompson, 
introduced the ceremony of the chal- 
lenge of the new Y.W. and Y 
presidents, Miss Marie Gelwicks and 
Fred Mund, by the old presidents to 
carry on the work of the "Y" 
Candles symbolized the "gleam" 
which is to be the guiding light of 
the new leaders. After this Dr. R. 
R. Butterwick challenged both presi- 
( Continued on Page 4) 



EURYDICE GIVES 
FIRST CONCERT 

VERSATILE PROGRAM 
LENDS MUCH 
COLOR 



On Tuesday evening, March 24, the 
Euydice Choral Club, unedr the able 
direction of Prof. Crawford, scored a 
victory before a large audience in Le- 
banon. This recital appearance arous- 
ed much coment and the club is to 
be congratulated. The numbers by 
the club were quite enjoyable and the 
entertainment was enriched by the 
piano solos by Dorothy Haldeman, 
vocal solos by Margaret Young and 
-cello solos by Henrietta Heilman. The 
skit, "Silvia's Aunt," was cleverly per- 
formed. 

The program was as follows: 
PART I 

Alma Mater Lehman-Spessard 

The Smiling Down Handel 

The Call ... Mark Andrews 

The Brown Bear Mana Zucca 

THE CLUB 

Consolation in E Liszt 

Polichvelle Rachmaninoff 

(Dorothy Haldeman) 
All the World's in Love 

Woodman-Deis 

Indian Serenade Beresford 

In a Boat Greig-Hawes 

PART II 

Silvia's Aunt Dorothp Waldo 

Characters: 

Francis ». Marion Kruger 

Edith Mildred Christiansen 

Lois, Nan — mischevious Sophs 

Milred Nye, E. Salorio 
Eleanor, a dignified Senior 

Elizabeth Flook 

Elizabeth Hester Thompson 

Ruth, a Freshman Helen Colby 

Miss Madeline Smith ....Eulalie Morton 
Miss Martha Smith Quebe Nye 

(Continued on Page 4) 



FROSH "Y" CABINET 

ENTERTAINED AT TEA 



Members of the retiring Y.W.C.A. 
cabinet, Madame Green, Miss John- 
son, Miss Lietzan, and Mrs. Wallace 
were delightfully entertained on 
Tuesday afternoon in North Hall 
Parlor, by the Freshman "Y" cabi- 
net. The program furnished a violin 
duet by Christine Gruber and Char- 
lotte Weirick, accompanied on the 
piano by Kathryn Mowrey. Martha 
Kreider gave a very pretty interpre- 
tation of the wee dance. Mildred 
Nye and Mirian Book gave a piano 
duet, while Christine Gruber delight 
ed everyone with her musical read- 
ings, "I Ain't Going to Cry No 
More," and "Circumstantial" Evi- 
dence." 

Exceptionally good refreshments 
were served by the hostess, after 
Which cards and dancing were enjoy- 
ed for the rest of the afternoon 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 1931. 



ffo Wxt (Eoile^iemte 

ESTABLISHED 1925 

V weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 Kditor-in-Chief 

Fred Mund, '32 Associate Editor 

Hilda D. Buckley, '32. .Associate Editor 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32 

Associate Editor 
Walter Krumbiegel, '33, 

Managing Editor 

REPOBTOUIAL STAFF 

Elizabeth Ulrich, '32 

Edward Shellenbcrger, '33 

Edmund Umberger, '34.. Gen 1 Reportci 

Dorothy Garber, '32 General Reporter 

George Snowhill, '34 Conservatory 

Percy Clements, '33 Athletics 

Jane Muth. '33 £ 1 ?°£! an 

Arline Heckrote, '33 Delphian 

Clarence Earley, *33 Kalozetean 

Chester Goodman, '33 Philokosmian 

Gloria Lavanture , '33.. Alumni Rep orter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Robert Rawhouser, *32, 

Business Manager 

Herman Mariano, '33, 

Ass't Business Manage- 
Paul Kleinfelter, '32, 

Circulation M anager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. W agner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Mi ddle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1-50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



are not prepared or wish to do some- 
thing else. Let's show the faculty 
a 100 per cent, attendance. We will 
become more interested and en- 
thused in our studies if we get all 
the connecting links from day to 
day instead of missing important 
points frequently. Notice how you 
will not want to miss one recitation 
after you have started the habit of 
attending every class. Let's try it! 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



CUTS ! 



What are cuts? The question is 
often asked of a college student by 
one who has never heard the expres- 
sion. Then the young fellow will 
tell him that "cuts" are excused ab- 
sences which every one is allowed to 
take, the number being twice as 
many as the amount of hours in aca- 
demic work that onet akes in a 
week's school time. 

When "cuts" were first introduced, 
they were given for the express pur- 
pose of emergency or necessity; peo- 
ple were to make use of them during 
sickness or absence from the school 
or what not. Of late years the prac- 
tice has been abused. Students miss 
classes whenever they feel so inclin- 
ed, often taking more than the per- 
mitted number of absences. The pun- 
ishment meted out for this is that 
the student must take an "over-cut" 
examination and also donate to the 
Library Fund three dollars. This 
practice is both disliked by the fac- 
ulty and by the student for it re- 
quires extra work which might easily 
by avoided. Students come to col- 
lege to learn; they pay money to have 
advantage of this privilege, yet they 
come and voluntarily miss class reci. 
tations and thus do not recive the 
education for which they are here. 
The professor is not harmed by the 
student's continuous failure to ap- 
pear at the period of the meeting of 
the class. It is the student who suf- 
fers finally. At the time he may 
feel perfectly content with himself 
and very self-satisfied that he has 
not attended his daily classes, per- 
haps missing a valuable lecture or 
an important examination. Some 
students find it too inconvenient to 
attended eight o'clock classes; others 
are too tired to go to late afternoon 
recitations. So thus the situation 
stands. Many times, professors 
must lecture before ill-attended 
classes only because the students do 
not realize the importance of get- 
ting the full benefit of their college 
education. The student body simply 
cannot realize that the "cuts" which 
are permitted, need not be taken. 
Let's try to get more out of our edu- 
cation, to get all that it is possible 
to receive from our studies. In the 
end we will be greatly profited even 
though we feel quite satisfied at be- 
ing able to miss classes whenever we 



The regular' meeting of the Clion- 
ian Literary Society was called to 
order Friday evening, March 20. 
Money-making plans were discussed. 
The society decided upon the rainy 
day bags which are to be given out 
the first of April. 

Eulalie Morton acted as chairman 
of the program. A piano solo was- very 
well played by Dorothy Snyder. An 
interesting and well prepared debate 
on the question "Resolved: That an 
Old Maid is more Popular than a 
Bacheloir" was the second number. 
Ethel Howe r upheld the affirmative 
side, while Christian Gruber debated 
the negative side. The society mem- 
bers acted as judges, and agreed with 
Miss Hower in their decision. This 
may have been due to the fact that 
Miss Hower gave the women credit 
for having enough pluck for trying 
to get their man, even though some 
points were expressed for both sexes. 

Lorraine Seeley and Kathryn Lutz, 
our West Hall harmonizers, sang 
"Just a Gigalo" and "When Your 
Hair has Turned to Silver." After 
these selections, the campus "wise 
cracks" were read by Ethel Hower, 
the Editor of "The Olive Branch." 

After the critic's report, the meet- 
ing was adjourned. 



educational talk on "Recent Art 
Finds in Pompeii." He told of the 
115-piece silver table set decorated 
with scenes from the life of Hercules 
which has just been unearthed in the 
ruins of the old city. 

The mebers of the Philo orches- 
tra, including Mund, Allen, Ulrich, H. 
Zech, and Shope, although unable to 
play, due to the absence of the 
pianist, formed themselves into a 
sextette and sang "Old Folks at 
Home," much to the amusement of 
the society. 

Paul Keene gave the experience of 
one of his week-ends in a talk en- 
titled "The Pleasures of Hopping." 
It was very interesting and several 
new things were learned of John 
Hughes, a worthy member of the 
society. 

Fred Mund, substituting for 
Woodrow Dellinger, offered Living 
Thoughts. He read several original 
poems pertaining to love and spring- 
time. Where Mr. Mund reecived his 
inspiration is a subject of conjecture. 
The meeting adjourned after the 
critic's report by Charles Wise. 

The Philo Anniversary play for 
this year promises to be one of the 
best on the campus thus far. The 
committee has chosen "The Knight 
of the Burning Pestle," an Eliza- 
bethan play written by Beaumont 
and jFletcher. The following is the 
cast: 

Speaker of the Prologue Dellinger 

A Citizen Taylor 

His Wife Margaret Lehn 

Ralph Eshleman 

Venturewell Evancoe 

Humphrey . Mund 

Ferrythought Wolfe 



Ion. By piecing together clues from 
three clay tablets, one in th eBritish 
Museum, one belonging to Goucher 
College and one at Yale, Dr. Dough- 
erty has identified the site of the 
city of Tema which King Nabonidus 
conquered and ruled as that now oc- 
cupied by the oasis Tema in an in- 
accessible part of the Arabian desert. 

Nabonidus was the father of Bel- 
shazzar whom he left to act as ruler 
of Babylon, while he went away at 
the head of an army to conquer Tema 
and set up his court there instead of 
returning to Babylon, remaining 
eight years, the greater part of his 
entire reign. 

Dr. Dolgherty is an alumnus — 
A.B. '97, and many of the student 
body will remember him as he de- 
livered the Baccalaureate sermon 
here last Commencement time. 

Prof. Charles A. Fry, '06, Princi- 
pal of the Roosevelt High School in 
Portland, Oregon, was a recent caller 
at Annville. He atended a convention 
of School Pension and Retirement 
Officials in Detroit. He is the presi- 
dent of the Teachers' Retirement 
Board in Portland and was their of- 
ficial representative at the Detroit 
meeting. 



Dr. H. H. Baish, '01, Secretary of 
the Teachers' Retirement Board of 
Pennsylvania was also in attendance. 



Rev. A. H. Kleffman '16, Pastor of 
the West Presbyterian Church, Wil- 
mington, Del. for the last four years, 
has recently been called to the Be- 
thany Presbyterian Church, Philadel- 
phia, the church founded by the late 
John Wanamaker, with a member- 
Jasper Keene I shi P of over 2,000 and a Sunday 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



A large crowd of Delphian s wended 
their way to the big tent, Delphian 
Hall, on Friay edvening, March 20, 
to witness the Junior Circus. How- 
aver, the circus train had been de- 
'ayed and the show could not be pre- 
sented. This temporary disappoint- 
ment was soon effaced by the clever, 
snappy program which was pre- 
sented. Marie Gelwicks, chaplain, 
conducted devotions, and then the 
Barker, Gladys Hershey, took charge. 
She introduced "The Emotions," De- 
mureress. Horror, Silliness, Haughti- 
ness, Intelligence (typical L. V. stu- 
dent), Anger, and Astonishment. 
Three rousing cheers were given to 
Evangeline Salorio as a prize for 
guessisg all these. Henrietta Wag- 
ner, "Peg" Lehn, Ruth Shroyer, 
Edith Fields, Elizabeth Ulrich, May 
capably portrayed the emotions. An 
eld-fashioned "spelling bee" was 
then held, in which everyone partici- 
pated. "Peg" Lehna cted as master 
of ceremonies, and read off "eighth 
grade words" until one side finally 
was vanquished. Ruth Shroyer and 
Gladys Hershey, the versatile girls, 
demonstrated their musical ability 
by singing several new pep songs, 
and trying to teach their audience to 
sing them also. These songs were 
reecived with much enthusiasm by 
the society, and may help to infuse a 
better spirt into it. The critic, Sarah 
Ensminger, made very favorable 
comments on the program and on the 
spirit which prompted it when the 
original program scheduled could not 
be given. The meeting was then ad 
journed. 



Michael Knisely 

Tim H Emmenheiser 

George Hughes 

Host Werner 

Barber Barr 

Luce Benturewell Anne Kiehl 

Mistress Ferrythought.. Betty Lefevre 
Pompiona Evangeline Salario 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



School of 1,800. It is one of the 
three largest churches in Philadel- 
phia and in membership the 35th 
among the 10,000 Presbyterian 
churches in the United States. The 
Le Vie congratulates our alumnus 
upon the honor of being called to so 
large and important a field of 
service. 



Prof, and Mrs. William H. Behney, 
'25, announce the arrival of a son, 
Harry, in their home at 355 S. Union 



The Kalozetean Literary Society 

held a regular business meeting last 
T7, • ■. • . i. . g n . i. St., Burlington, Vt., where the proud 

Friday evening m their Hall m the I c ^ ._ 6 _ . Z, 

Engle Conservatory. Due to the an 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



The regular Philokosmian literary 
session on /Friday, March 20. was 
called to order by Francis Barr, after 
which Chester Goodman led in devo- 
tions. 

Stuart Warner delivered a very 



niversary, the literary session was 
dispensed with. 

The purpose of the meeting was to 
decide whether or not the society 
should buy the radio which had been 
loaned to the society. The society 
decided in the affirmative and bought 
besides the radio, a four piece wicker 
suite, six bridge tables and four 
smoking stands. It is hoped that 
through the purchase of these ar- 
ticles, the members might find more 
justification for having joined the so- 
ciety. 

The work of the anniversary com- 
mittee has also progressed well. On 
Friday evening, the society will pre- 
sent Bernard Shaw's play "Androcles 
and the Lion," which will be followed 
by a reception in the gymnasium. 
Saturday evening the society will 
hold their first Annual Dinner Dance 
at the Penn-Harris Hotel in Harris- 
burg. Ted Brownagle and his or- 
chestra will furnish the music for 
the dancing. 



father is a professor in the Depart- 
ment of Zoology. 



Miss Mary McCurdy, '30, has been 
elected to a teaching position in the 
High Schools at New Windsor, Md. 
She is teaching Biology and General 
Science. Miss McCurdy was a week- 
end visitor of Miss Cynthia Benzing 
and visited the campus on Sunday. 





According to an account in "Sci- 
ence News Letter" for January 24, 
Dr. Raymond P. Dougherty of Yale 
Babylonian Collection has been able 
to fit together evidence that makes 
clearer one of the most mysterious 
stages in the career of King Naboni- 
dus, last of the native kings of Baby- 



With the aid of Ed. Shellenberger's 
writing machine I will endeavor to 
pen the old column once again. It 
js a bit of fun and all that, especially 
when news is so plentiful. 

Have you ever allowed your wife, 
sister or Mother bamboozle you 
into going into a women's wear lair 
with her, ostensibly to aid in the pur- 
chase of a hat ? Well, if you haven't 
—DON'T. You will feel very silly 
and practically useles, and she will 
buy the one she wants anyway. 

The other night my sister decided 
she'd buy a hat and for some mys- 
terious reason known only to her 
she decided that I'd go along. Now, 
I know scarcely anything about hats, 
and a somewhat vague anamness of 
our few previous shopping excur- 
sions together brought forth no evi- 
dence that I'd ever been of any serv- 
ice in selecting her head-gear. How- 
ever, we compromised, and I went 
Irotting along and she dragged me 



into a swanky shoppe and the next 
thing I knew I was surrounded by; 

All of a half a thousand hats, 

Each of a different shade, 
And all of a hundred slinky shapes 

For a matron, miss and maid; 
And here was a symphony in red 

And there was a dream in green, 
And one was a lovely Paris type 

With a softly silken sheen. 

Well, Veva (that's her name) must 
have tried on half-a-dozen creations 
— any one of which would have been 
alright — before she found one that 
merited consultation. That one 
shimmered like a green-and-gold 
meadow on a June afternoon as she 
pressed the delicate mesh carefully 
down on her head — 

"Oh, here's a wonderful turban, dear, 
And don't you like the flare?" 

And she tilted a perky vision 
Over all her Auburn hair. 

She tweaked it halfway over an eye 
And tucked her hair below, 

And "How d'you like it thus," she 
said, 

"And how d'you like it so?" 

; 

I was just about to get enthusi- 
astic about it and really help Marie 
make a sale when Marie who had 
been piling hats on the bar — I mean 
counter — with reckless abandon, sud- 
denly uttered a politely repressed but 
ecstatic scream. "Veva!" she said, 
"Just look at this one with the halo 
on it!" Well, I got interested again 
and looked at it too — 

And that had a droopy, purple brim 
And a purple halo 'round it, 

That fitted over her touseled head 
"At last," I thought, "She's found 
it" 

But a halo isn't her type, alas, 
And that, too, was rejected 
And tossed beside the rest; she 
bought 

The first one she inspected. 

I always had the idea that when a 
man went in for music on a large 
scale that he had to give up all 
worldly pleasantries that the rest of 
we mortals are allowed to engage in. 
However, last Thursday night I saw 
a promising young operatic baritone 
with a oversized cud of chewing to- 
bacco in his mouth. I thought this 
manly art was reserved for ball 
players and circus hands. Alas, we 
learn too late to console our disillu- 
sioned minds. 

I had a letter from a good friend 
of mine in my home town and he in- 
forms me that the City Council has 
banned the ringing of the old curfew 
as it woke too many people up! 

Earl Howard has submitted the 
following letter and in case it meets 
with disapproval I hereby dissolve 
myself of any connections other than 
the laws of Journalism edict: 

Dear Student: 

The college is in need of funds. As 
you know, the chief source of such 
funds is from the students. Yo ^ 
bill is now overdue, and if it is at a 
possible, please make payment a 
once. 

Yours truly, 
THE FINANCE COMMITTED 
Paduka U- 



Dear Sir: 



of 



Am in reecipt of your letter 
need. I can indeed sympathize w 
you. It seems impossible that y 
need the money worse than I. ^ ^ 
have need of it worse than I, it lS g 
deed a case of great need, and s ^ 
step should be taken to remedy 
Yours truly, 

O. H. S. 
A student and fellow suffe^ 
Good-day. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 1931. 



PAGE THREE 




Prof. Stokes rides to his Economics 
class on a business cycle. 



Editor's Note: The following is 
n intimate glimpse into the private 
life of ye Boomerang column editor 
w hile at work on tnis week ' s column. 

Ho-ho-hum, another week, and an- 
other column. What a job! "Hey, 
r oom-mate, did you see my "College 
Humor? What? Speg borrowed it 
again. Well, how the blazes am I 
t0 write this week's column?" My 
gosh, now I have to think up some 
original cracks. Well, here it goes. 
It seems there was a salesman, and 
pdxc?wov6&A. Ye gods, ever since 
Tony Reeder has been writing his 
Campus Quills on this machine it's 
so hot it types of its own accord. 
The only thing to do is to take that 
red ribbon out. Now, that's better. 
"No, Taylor, I do not have a cigar- 
ette, and, furthermore, don't forget 
to close the door when you go out." 

girls, did you hear the dirt about 
Paul Keene? He smoked a cigar- 
ette. And did you hear about that 
man in kilts, McCusker. He gets a 
box of candy from the young maidens 
in South Hall. Does he eat it? Well, 

1 guess not. He takes it to his room, 
ties a pink ribbon around it, and 
then moves in the general direction 
of W. H. (meaning West Hall), and 
presents it to a certain party by the 
name of Gem. Oh Bobby! "What's 
that, room-mate? Ruth Shroyer on 
the phone ? Tell her this column will 
absolutely be done in five minutes." 
The miracle has happened: Dellinger 
had a date. How about walking her 
to the post one of these days, 
Straeyr, so we can see what she looks 
like. Trula Koch suggested that I 
print my picture in this column. 
Wonder what she meant by that? 
You know I wrote a biography of 
that man from the old country, 
Walter Otto, but when the censors 
were done with it, there were only 
three pages left. "No, Peter, I did 
not borrow your pink necktie. Better 
ask Johnny Hughes." Poor Ulrich, 
he don't know which one of his girls 
to take to Philo. Take 'em all, Sam- 
my. "Hello, Spuggy. thank gosh you 
brought my "College Humor" back. 
Now I can start work on this col 
umn." Before signing off I wish to 
join Brother Reeder in shouting for 
a Junior Prom. How about it! Come 
on, gang, let's go! And don't forget, 
vacation's approaching. Have a swell 
time, all. Going, going, GONE. 



We want to point out that while 
every man has his wife, only the ice 
man has his pick. 




What happened to the Private Sec- 
retai'y? Where's the Private Secre- 
tary? In answer to these and nu- 
merous other questions, the staff 
wishes to make the following an- 
nounceemnt: 

The Private Secretary is dead. 
After many years of long and faithful 
service, he has been laid to rest with 
his faithful typewriter at his side. No 
longer will his column grace the pages 
of the "La Vie," and bring cheer to 
all. No longer will his fun and cheery 
wit be enjoyed by all, for he has de- 
parted from our midst. 

But weep not, my friends, his place 
has been filled .Into his shoes will 
step "College Boy." "College Boy" is 
full of vim, vitality, and vigor. He is 
modern, full of pep, and fun-loving. 
Look for our new friend, "College 
Boy" in the next issue. 



TENNIS SCHEDULE 

IS ARRANGED 



Dayton, Ohio. All who wish to try 
out for the team and were not at 
the meeting are requested to see 
either the manager Joe Hutchinson 
or Coach Stevenson. 

The schedule to date is as follows: 

April 17 — Bonebrake Here 

April 18— 17. & M Away 

April 24 — Elizabethown Here 

April 24 — St. Joseph's Here 

May 2 — Dickinson Here 

May fi — Elizabethtown Away 

May 13— Albright Away 

May 15 — Juniata Here 

May 16 — Susquehanna Here 

May 19 — St. Joseph's Away 

May 20 — Moravian Away 

May 23 — Dickinson Away 

May 27— Albright Here 

May 29 — Juniata Away 

May 30 — Susquehanna Away 

The Tennis Association requests 
the cooperation of all the students in 
keeping the courts in shape. Never 
use the courts unless wearing regu- 
lation tennis shoes. All shoes with 
heels especially rubber soled oxfords 
and girl's hockey shoes do quite a 
bit of damage to the courts. Let's 
all cooperate and keep the courts in 
shape— it's to the good of all that 
this request be carried out. 



Spring Fashion Note: Camels will 
not be smoked on the campus this 
season. 



This Week's Song Hit: I don't 
wind your looking up my family 
tree but let my limbs alone. 



Dot: What happened to Rudy? 
Ann; Drowned while skating. 
Dot: Fall through the ice? 
Ann: No, he fell down and spring 
c ame before he could get up. 



At a recent meeting of candidates 
for the tennis team along with the 
coach, Prof. Stevenson and manager 
Joseph Hutchinson, plans for the 
coming season were discussed and 
the schedule to date was announced. 

The team this year will be some- 
what weaker than last year due to 
the loss of three first stringers by 
graduation. Shroyer, Hertler and 
Fink occupied births last season and 
their services will be sorely missed. 
Donmoyer, Hutchinson, Rank and 
Miller will form the nucleus of the 
outfit this year. Each has had var- 
sity experience which adds a great 
deal to college competition. Don- 
moyer playing third place last sea- 
son will probably occupy the first 
man position during the coming sea- 
son due to his brilliant play and ex- 
perience. He has never lost a match 
j since he has been playing college cir- 
cles. He won the Lebanon County 
championship last year defeating 
Shroyer of Annville — also a number 
of the flashy L. V. C. team last year. 

Those atending the meeting were 
Donmoyer, Rank, Miller, Hutchinson, 
Bonner, Letham, Spangler, and Leh- 
man. A great deal of interest is be- 
ing aroused by the team and it of- 
fers more home tilts than any other 
fcport on the college calendar. The 
games are free and carried on at a 
loss so the cooperation and support 
of the entire student body is neces- 
sary to put them across. 

Practice will begin as soon as the 
weather permits and the team is ex- 
pecting to be in great shape for their 
initial encounter on April 17th with 
Bonebrake Theological Seminary of 



Y. W.-Y. M. NOTES 



My Room-mate: I'm in a terrible 
and don't know where to get 
some money. 

Me: Good. I was afraid you 
thought you could get some from me. 



Stranger: I represent a society for 
the prevention of profanity. I want 
to take profanity entirely out of 
y °ur life and 

Lick: Hey, Pat, here's a man wants 
to ouy your Ford. 



Some girls let a fool kiss them; 
°ther s let a kiss fool them. 



Then there's the Frosh who thinks 



On Sunday evening an especially 
interesting (Friendly Hour was enjoy- 
ed by th e girls of the Y.W.C.A. The 
topic of the meeting, which was led 
by Henrietta Wagner, was the Y.W. 
C.A. and other Christian work in for 
eign lands. 

Henrietta Wagner read as the 
Scripture lesson Zechariah 2:15, 
after which Sara Ensminger led in 
prayer. Christine G ruber, accom- 
panied by Kathryn Mowrey at the 
piano, gave a violin solo, "Inter- 
mezzo," from "Cavallerie Rusticana." 
Miriam Book gave an interesting re- 
sume of the work done by the Y.W. 
C.A. in other countries, to which Miss 
Lietzau added a few facts concerning 
the work in Greece. Esther Smelser 
told some of her personal experiences 
as a child in Japan. 



PRINTING— 

Stationery, Announcements, 
Publications, Catalogues, 
Booklets, Etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO' 

Annville .... Penna. 



THIS IS A QUALITY SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

Service, Workmanship and Matei'ials 
Hand Stitching 

W. D. ELLIOTT, JR. 

140 N. Railroad St., 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



Worthwhile 
Literature 
for the Student 

HUMANITY UPROOTED. 

By Maurice Hindus 

UNCLE SAM'S ATTIC. 
An Intimate Story of Alaska 

By Mary Lee Davis 
$3.50 

THE AMERICAN LEVIATHAN 
The Republic in the Machine Age 
By William and Charles Beard 

CLEMENCEAU. 

By Jean Martet 
$5.00 

UNIVERSITIES. 

American - English - German 
By Abraham Flexner 
$3.75 

ELIZABETH BARRET 
BROWNING. 

By Louise Schultz Boas 
$3.50 

THE ENDURING QUEST. 

A Search for a Philosophy 
of Life 

By H. A. Overstreet 
$3.00 

BOLLMAN'S 

33 South Eighth Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Miriam Book introduced her talk 
by giving reasons why we should be 
interested in the work being done 
outside our own country: first be- 
cause knowledge of and co-operation 
with those working with us in other 
lands is essential for our own spirit- 
ual and intellectual life; second, be- 
cause we should share our experi- 
ences with others, and lastly because 
the woman's movement is world-wide 
in scope. Outlines were given of the 
work being done in countries the 
world over. In Cuba, it was learned, 
■there are great opportunities for 
service to the working girls, who 
could be very easily reached, and 
greatly helped by the Y. W. C. A., 
which has, as yet, not been able to 
carry an extensive work there. In 
Buenos Aires, the center of Y. W. 
work in Argentina, great service is 
rendered in traveler's aid work, an 
employment bureau, physical educa- 
tion, clubs and religious work. In 
Rio de Janerio the "Y" is working 
for free education for women. Girl's 
clubs aie organized and health work 
is carried on. The chief work in 
Santiago, Chili, is done through the 
English Circle and the Camp Club. 
In Greece, it was revealed, the Y.W. 
C.A. meets on the golden staircase 
of an old palace in Athens. The or- 
ganization was started after the fire 
in Smyrna, as a refuge for the vic- 
tims. In Turkey the "Y" has served 
chiefly by its health work. A normal 
school for physical education was 
started there through the efforts of 
the "Y". The chief work in Syria 
is industrial. In India the "Y"' mem- 
bers ar"e working for the ideal of 
world brotherhood, in their East and 
West Club. The chief work in China 
is that done in Sunday Schools and 
in Bible study groups. In Japan an 
extensive work is carried on which 
includes a large number of business 
girls and factory workers .The work 
in the Phillippines, organized only 
five years ago, already reaches a 
large number of girls and young 
women. Miss Lietzau added a few 
remarks about the work being done 
in Greece. She brought out the fact 
that the reason for the success of 
the Y.W.C.A. in so many different 
countries is that it is so versatile in 
its interests and can adapt itself so 
well to the conditions and needs of 
the people it serves. 

Esther Smelser gave an account of 
her life in Japan. Of especial in- 



terest were her descriptions of her 
life in a Japanese school, of the life 
in a Japanese home before and after 
Christianity had entered it, and of 
her visit as a small girl to a mission 
station in the slums of a Japanese 
city. 




Do you remember that story car- 
ried in this column last week, the story 
of the great Wendel fortune, which, 
on the recent death of apparently the 
last member of the Wendel family, 
was to be distributed to charity ? Well, 
as was probable in a case like that, 
there have arisen a number of claim- 
ants to the enormous pile of wealth. 
There are no less than six persons, in 
widely separated portions of the earth, 
who, because of supposed relation- 
ships, old parchment documents, sec- 
ret marriages, and other evidence 
brought forth, demand shares of the 
Wendel millions. We wonder how 
many of these claims are genuine. 
What would you do if your surname 
were Wendel? 



In the news of the week, we read 
two separate items which seem to have 
a very definite connection. The oil 
producers and operators are striving 
to obtain permission to limit the sup- 
ply of oil, of which there is a great 
surplus on the market. On the other 
hand, there is the news that the Die- 
sel engine, an oil-burning motor, is 
nearing perfection and is expected to 
be soon in widespread use. Here is 
another example of that oft-recurring 
phenomenon, the appearance of a new 
market for an over-produced commo- 
dity. 



Our literary tid-bit this week is 
concerned with a squabble between 
two members of the intelligensia, Sin- 
clair Lewis, who was awarded the 
Noble prize, and Theoodre Dreiser, the 
Genius. These two literary giants 
had been invited to a party given by 
Ray Long, the editor. In a speech .at 
the party, Lewis charged Dreiser with 
filching three thousand words from a 
book by Dorothy Thompson, Lewis' 
wife. Bad led to worse, and near the 
close of the party, Dreiser let fly two 
stinging slaps to Lewis' face, but he 
could not provoke physical retaliation 
by the red-haired creator of Babbit. 
Except for forthcoming statements, 
the affair ended there. Was this quar- 
( Continued on Page 4) 



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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 1931. 



EURYDICE GIVES 

FIRST CONCERT 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Place: College room at L.V.C. 
Time: Present. 

Out of the Dusk C. Edwards 

Night M. H. Brown 

A Fairy Visitor V. Leoni 

(Margaret Young) 

Cello Solo — Serenade Badine 

Gott meria 
(Henrietta Heilman) 

Bridal Chorus Cowen-Spichler 

Coquetry H. S. Greyer 

THE CLUB. 



INSTALLATION 

OF "Y" OFFICERS 



(Continued from Page 1) 



dent and later all the members of 
the cabinets to see their opoprtuni- 
ties on the campus and to live up to 
their convictions, thus acting as true 
religious and moral leaders among 
the student body. Fred Fund offered 
the closing prayer and the conclu- 
sion of the program was the singing 
of "Follow the Gleam" by both 
cabinets in unison. 



STUDENT PRAYER MEET- 
ING OFFICERS ELECTED 



Offcers for the year 1931-31 were 
elected at the Student Prayer Meet- 
ing on Wednesday, March 18. This 
activity is headed by a chairman and 
a chairlady, namely, Chester A. Good- 
man and Ruth Coble. Both of these 
persons are well equipped to lead 
this body, as both have had one 
year's experience in "Y" work. 

The Student Prayer Meeting con- 
stitutes one of the major spiritual 
influences on the campus, and is well 
supported by the student body. The 
work will undoubtedly continue to 
prosper, if intruding activities are not 
allowed to completely srut it out. 



DELPHIANS VANQUISH 

CLIONIAN GIRLS 



The Delphian Basketball team 
won a fast but one-sided game from 
the Clio outfit in the Alumni Gym 
last Thursday night by a score of 
31-17. 

The game was colorful in spots due 
to the fast floor play of the girls- 
the majority of whom had seen var- 
sity experience during the past sea- 
son. Both outfits exhibited good 
passing attacks but were at a loss 
when it came to sinking the wto 
pointers. 

Clio started the fireworks by run- 
ning up a five point lead before the 
Delphians could get going. Due to 
the shooting of Yingst and Gemmil 
at forwards the lead was soon over- 
hauled and Delphian forged ahead 
holding this place for the remainder 
of the game. The half ended with 
the score standing 13-10 in favor of 
the followers of the triangle. 

iDuring the second half the Del- 
phians outclassed their hard fight- 
ing opponents 18-7. Rupp and 
Armacoirt displayed beautiful foimi 
at the center posts while Miller did 
all of the scoring for Clia. Shroyer 
and Fields of Delphian played a 
good game at guard keeping the Clio 
forwards closely guarded throughout 
the tilt. The game ended with a 
final score of 31-17 in favor of Del- 
phian. 

Yingst led the scorers for the 
evening with a total of 22 points, 
while Miller had the grand total 
of 17. 



SENIORS WIN 

OVER SOPHS 



(Continued from Page 1) 

was soon cut down and the Seniors 
started a barrage of field goals that 
did not end until the final whistle 
had blown. Time after time the 
Sophs threatened but they lacked the 
punch and vitality necessary to put 
on a scoring spurt. Speg and Baines 
resorted to long shots during the 
closing moments of the game but to 
no avail — the lead was too great to 
haul down. 

Wood of the Seniors led the scor- 
ers with six field goals and four 
fouls. Rank, his team mate and hero 
of the last minute spurt, scored four 
field goals and a foul during the last 
quarter for a total of 9 points. Say- 
lor and Baines led the Sophs with 
the latter having a slight lead — by 
»y scoring 4 field goals and four 
fouls for a total of 12 points. Speg 
played his usual good game at guard 
but was off on his long shots. 

Thus ended the "ice-box festi- 
vals" for this season. By next year 
the cuts and bruises deceived as 
scars of battle this ear will all be 
healed and each class will have a 
team on the floor fighting for the 
glory of their class, to see their name 
in print and to help buy footballs for 
our gridiron heroes — Long may it 
live I 



A-t SI 




mmswomERS\ 







ANNV1LLE SHOEMAN 



207 W. Main 



READER'S CLUB WILL 

ATTEND PASSION PLAY 



On Monday, March 30, some of the 
members of the Reader's Club are 
planning to attend the performances 
of the Passion Play to be given at the 
Zembo Mosque in Harrisburg. The 
performance will be the same as was 
given in Germany, but will be pre- 
sented in the English language. The 
proposed trip is consistent with the 
plans of the Reader's Club in attend- 
ing several good plays during the 
course of the year. 

IThose planning to attend are Dr. 
and Mrs. P. A. W. Wallace, Betty Le- 
fever, Mary Elizabeth Stephens, Viola 
Williams, Paul Evancoe, Earl Wolf, 
Edward Shellenberger, and several 
members of Dr. Wallace's English 
classes. 



EXCHANGE PAPERS MAY 

BE SEEN IN LIBRARY 

The attention of the student body 
is called to the fact that publications 
of many colleges are placed weekly 
in the Library. Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege has a wide exchange, and for 
those interested in journalism, gen- 
eral student activity, and the course 
of events in colleges, it provides an 
excellent source of material. No stu- 
dent should overlook the opportunity 
for broadening his horizon. 



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Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



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BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



(Continued from Page 3) 



rel merely a temperamental outburst, 
or was it caused by a thoughtless, 
petty nature? 



President Jacobs, of Ashland Col- 
lege, has studied the physical measure- 
ments of six thousand girls over a 
period of fifteen years. He finds that 
young ladies, in spite of short skirts 
and light clothing, are steadily gain- 
ing in height, weight, and lung capa- 
city. We do not know if Pres. Jacobs' 
findings are pleasing intelligence to 
the feminine element, but this column 
has always stood for bigger and bet- 
ter girls. 



One of the periodical attacks on the 
moral, social, and political conditions 
of New York City is again under way, 
but this time it seems to be wide- 
spread enough and vigorous enough to 
raise it out of the ordinary class. 
Mayor Jimmy Walker, the smiling, 



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charges against Mayor Walker, while 
Rev. J. H. Holmes and Rabbi Stephen 
S. Wise ask his removal. All in all 
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Irish executive, who is now faced with 
a real situation out of which to joke 
his way. 



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"Y" Conference to be held at Lebanon Valley April 23-26 



REMEMBER THE 



"Y" CONFERENCE 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



CONGRATULATIONS 
KALO ! 



VOLUME VIII ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 


16, 1931. 


No. 5 


Kalo Scores Big Success 


in Ann 


iversary 



SHAW'S PLAY 
WELL PRESENTED 



BIG EVENT OF SCHOOL 
\ YEAR; MANY VISITORS 
ATTEND HUGE SUCCESS 



The fifty-fourth anniversary of the 
Kalozetean Literary Society was held 
on Friday evening, March 28, at 8:15 
P. M. in Engle Conservatory. The 
house as usual was filled to capacity 
with students, faculty, friends, and 
alumni of the college. After the in- 
vocation by Russell Morgan, Mr. Al- 
fred K. Mills presented a very inter- 
esting description of "Ancient Kalo," 
followed by a short sketch of "Mod 
ern Kalo" given by Willard Trezise. 
In the course of his talk, Mr. Trezise 
took occasion to thank publicly Miss 
Mary K. Wallace for her willing and 
able direction of Kalo's plays. In ad- 
dition he regretfully made the state- 
men that this was to be the last play 
given at Lebanon Valley under her 
direction because of her intended de- 
parture from the campus at the end 
of this year. 

The presentation of the 'evening 
was George Bernard Shaw's "Andrtf- 
cles and the Lion." The time of the 
action was about 50 A. D. and was 
mainly concerned with the Christian 
persecutions under Caesar. The pro- 
logue showed Androcles and his wife 
Megaera traveling through the forest, 
(Continued on Page 6) 



BOOST THE "QUITTIE" 

ORDER YOURS NOW 



Every year the Junior Class of Le- 
banon Valley undertakes the responsi- 
bility of producing a year book. The 
demand for one arose quite a few 
years ago and it is sincerely hoped 
that the demand will not decline this 
year nor in future years. The Quit- 
tie has always been something of 
which we may be proud, something 
which we can safely exhibit as repre- 
sentative of Lebanon Valley. It has 
always stood comparison with the 
an nuals of other schools and the 1932 
Quittie shall not be an exception. 

The 1932 Quittie represents a con- 
siderable amount of work for which 
there is no pecuniary remuneration 
a nd the sole reward is the satisfac- 
tion it brings to the student body. 
However, it also repreesnts a large 
lnv estment, and it is to remove the 
ligations incurred by that invest- 
ment that YOUR support is solicited. 

Nor will this year's annual lack 
jj°velties; many new features have 
bee n added; new photos, drawings, 
^tc. Another year is waning and the 

est Way to preserve the year is to 
bu y a 1932 Quittie. As you know, 
Photographs absolutely refuse to 
-S^ow old! 



GERMAN CLUB PASSES 

FIRST YEAR MARK 



The first anniversary of the Ger- 
man Club was observed at the regular 
meeting which was held in Soutlh 
Hall parlor on Tuesday evening, 
April 13. A short history of the 
club, including its origin and develop- 
ment, was given by the President, 
Ethel Hower. 

The program was divided into two 
parts. Medieval Germany was first 
portrayed. This was of a classical 
nature. Dorothy Haldeman played a 
piano solo, and Violet Morton sang 
a German song. 

The second part of the program was 
concerning modern Germany. Mar- 
garet Paris gave a reading in Ger- 
man on "Radio Trouble." A poem. 
"Walzutraum" was read by Louella 
Heilman. A humorous reading in 
Pennsylvania German was given by 
Ethel Hower. The program was 
brought to a close by the singing of 
a song composed by Ethel Howai 
commemorating the anniversary of 
the club. 



KRUMB1EGEL TO 
EDIT QUITTIE 

SHELL ENBERBER AND 
DELLINGER TO 
ASSIST 



At a meeting of the sophomore 
class, Monday, April 13th, Walter 
Krumbeigel received the signal honor 
of editorship of the 1933 edition of 
the "Quittapahilla," annual year book 
of L. V. C. As his asociate editor, he 
has selected Edward Shellenberger, 
who ran a close race with Krumbeigel 
for the position. Woodrow Dellinger 
was elected business manager. 

Mr. Krumbeigel is well fitted to as- 
sume the arduous duties of the helms- 
man of the annual. He, as managing 
editor of the "La Vie" has had ex- 
perience in the publishing world and 
he is especially interested in journal- 
ism. He will, no doubt, give to the 
school a book of which is can be 
very proud. 

Edward Shellenberger, as associate 
editor will be most valuable as Krum 
beigel's right-hand man. He had 
showed much ability along this line, 
having edited an excellent year book 
in his high school. He is also a rep 
resentative of our paper staff. 

Woodrow Dellinger, as business 
manager, will leave nothing to be de- 
sired. He has held the office of 
treasurer in his class for several 
terms. He has shown especial apti- 
tude for the managing of business 
transactions and will exert his best 
efforts in the financial end of the 
book. 




The ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 
at Lebanon Valley College 



"Y" CONFERENCE 
ON CAMPUS 



CRANE, HART AND DIX 
Y. M. C. A. NOTABLES 
WILL SPEAK 



The fortieth Annual Cabinet Train- 
ing Conference for Central Pennsyl- 
vania that is sponsored by the State 
Student Council will meet at Lebanon 
Valley College on April 23, 24, 25, and 
26. 

Among some of the leaders that 
have been secured for the Conference 
are: Dr. Henry H. Crane of Scranton, 
Pa.; Rev. John R. Hart, Episcopal 
Chaplain at the University of Penn- 
sylvania; Mr. Philo C. Dix, State Sec- 
retay of the Y.M.C.A. of Pennsyl- 
vania; President G. Morris Smith of 
Susquehanna University; Dean W. 
E. Tilberg and Dr. W. C. Waltemyer 
of Gettysburg College. 

The theme of the Conference will 
be "Training for Personal Christian 
Leadership." 

In the Spring of each year new of- 
ficers are elected to take charge of the 
Y.M.C.A. at the colleges for the com- 
ing year. The Training Conference 
has been conducted for a great many 
(Continued on Page 3) 



BALTIMORE SEEN 
BY CHEMISTS 



EDUCATION TOUR MADE 
BY STUDENTS TO 
ALCOHOL PLANT 



STAR COURSE AND 

HANDBOOK EDITORS 

At a joint business meeting of the 
Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. it was decided 
to have a Star Course Programme for 
next year. Unlike former years, the 
memlbers of the two "Y" cabinets will 
constitute the Star Course Committee. 
The chairman of the Star Course is 
now Paul D. Emenheiser, having just 
been elected. In the near future var- 
ious fatures will be considered, and 
a selection will be made before the 
summer vacation. 

At this same meeting the officers 
of the Student Handbook were elected. 
The editor is Fred W. Mund, and the 
Associate Editor is Henrietta 
Wagner. 



Taking advantages of the sudden 
outburst of delightful weather the 
Chemistry Club journeyed to Balti- 
more, Md., last Friday where they 
visited the paints of the U. S. Com- 
mercial Alcohol Company. 

Leaving the campus about ten o'- 
clock, the party, consisting of about 
thirty, motored to the oyster city. 
Arriving early in the afternoon they 
immediately set out forthe planets. 

Under capable instructors, serving 
as guides they were shown through 
the entire establishment that special- 
izes in manufacturing the "forbidden 
liqu'd." Many interesting ad educa- 
tional explanations accompanied their 
trip. The strange way in which the 
manufacture of the alcohol was car- 
ried on caused a great deal of com- 
ment among the visitors. All of the 
test tubes, pumps, vats ,etc. used in 
the process of making the liquid were 
sealed and government inspectors 
and guards were stationed at close 
intervals to prevent any misappropri- 

( Continued on Page 6) 



CLUBS ATTEND PLAY 

WELL RECEIVED 



On Monday, April 6, members of 
the Readers and German Clubs jour 
neyed to Harrisburg to see the "Frei 
burg Passion Play" which was pre 
sented at the Zembo Foscque. The 
production was given in German, and 
was thoroughly enjoyed by those 
present. Even if one was unable to 
understand the script, the costuming 
and scenery more than made up for 
the deficiency. Especiallyo utstand- 
ing was the performances if Adolf 
Fassnacht in the role of The 
Christus. Those attending reported 
an evening well spent. 



DINNER DANCE 
SMART AFFAIR 



KALO DESERVES PRAISE 
FOR FORMAL EVENT 
AT PENN HARRIS 



The Kalizetan Literary Society 
completed its fifty-fourth anniversary 
^n Saturday evening, March 28, by 
holding a formal dinner dance in the 
Penn Harris Hotel at^ Harrisburg. 
The affair lasted from eight util 12 
o'clock. 

Despite the rainy weather, the true 
"Kalo spirit" dominated and a very 
large crowd, composed of alumni and 
present club members attended the 
event. At exactly eight o'clock the 
guests sat down to an elaborate din- 
ner served at tables of six individ- 
uals. 

Gayety and laughter mixed with 
tapping feet reigned during the oc- 
casion. Music was furnished by Ted 
Brownagle and his Victor Recording 
Orchestra. Novelties and several 
classical selections were rendeied dur- 
ing the course of the dinner. 

Dr. and Mrs. Light, Dr. Ohl and 
Professor Stokes acted as chaperones 
for the occasion. There were seventy 
couples present and this gala even/ 
proved that the students of Lebanon 
Valley College would attend events 
worthwhile. 

Through this formal dinner dance, 
Kalo Society expects to create a new 
tradition upon the campus by having 
this affair followed by bigger and 
better formal events. This was a 
step forward in the social functions 
of the schol. Next year we are going 
to look forward to another Kalo an- 
niversary as one of the high lights of 
the esason. 



GIRLS HOLD OPEN HOUSE 
VISITORS WELL PLEASED 



Just ,as the bright outdoors is 
calling forth admirers and lovers of 
nature, so did the girls open wide 
the doors of their respective dormi- 
tories Wednesday afternoon, April 
15th from 4:30 to 5:30 o'clock. 

The male element of the school 
filed by two's and three's in the vari- 
ous halls to see how the other half 
of the world lives. Each girl had 
spent a little time in giving the pro- 
verbial spring house-cleaning to her 
own little home in order that the 
rooms might present a pleasing ap- 
pearance. 

The visitors were royally entertain- 
ed, being treated to delicious eatables 
in each room. The hour sped by 
only too rapidly. But next year will 
soon be here and then on to receive 
the hospitality of the fair sex. 




PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, Ai'Rll. 1(>, WM 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

\. weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 

Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 Editor-in-Chief 

Fred Mund, '32 Associate Editor 

Hilda D. Buckley, '32. .Associate Editor 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32 

Associate Editor 
Walter Krumbiegel, '33, „ JJ 

Managing Editor 

REFORTORIAL STAFF 

Elizabeth Ulrich, '32 

Edward Shellenberger, '33 

Edmund Umberger, '34..Gen'l Reporter 

Dorothy Garber, '32 General Reporter 

George Snowhill, '34 Conservatory 

Percy Clements, '33 Athletics 

Jane Muth, '33 .Clionjan 

Arline Heckrote, '33 Delphian 

Clarence Earley, '33 Kalozetean 

Chester Goodman, '33 Philokosmian 

Gloria Lavanture, '33. -Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Robert Rawhouser, '32, 

Business Manager 

Herman Mariano, '33, 

Ass't Business Manager 
Paul Kleinfelter, '32, 

Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a ( member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle A tlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



SPRING FEVER! 



to evade it. Too much is lost dur- 
ing the important spring days in 
which we forfeit our time and energy 
to this nemesis of work. 




On Saturday, March 21, 1931, the 
"Harmonious Circle Trio" of which 
Mrs. Andrew Bender is a member, 
gave a concert at the Women's Club 
in Lebanon, Penna. 

The program consisted of four 
movements of the Mendelssohn Trio, 
a group of four other varying num- 
bers, and four numbers sung by Mrs. 
Mills. 

The personnel of the trio consisted 
of: Mrs. Andrew Bender, piano; Miss 
Sanders, violin; and Miss Gingrich, 
'cello. 



What is spring fever? We often 
ask ourselves this question. It isn't 
quite tangible; it is something we 
feel and are almost unable to over- 
come. It comes upon us when we 
are unconscious of it; it steals into 
our very being, our actions, and oui 
thoughts. We usually dread its com- 
ing for we realize the destruction 
it brings in its wake in the way of nc 
preparation for our usual duties. Wt 
speak of the dread disease during the 
winter months, sure of its arrival as 
the first crocus springs up from the 
fertile ground. It is the harbinger of 
spring, the sign that new life is 
beginning and manifesting its signt 
in Nature. We would not think 01 
disputing the sway which this menace 
of mankind holds over us. We grant 
its complete hold on us, surrendering 
quite cheerfully to what we like to 
think is an uncontrollable factor in 
our lives. 

And what is it? Let us ask our- 
selves frankly. When spring is in 
the air and the sun shines brightly 
and the whole outdoors lures us from 
our class rooms to our old haunts 
of former spring days, we go, but 
first deciding that it is nigh impos- 
sible for us to resist the call of spring 
fever. We cannot help it, we say — it 
is spring fever. How many times we 
can use this oft-worn excuse when 
important duties call. Let us be 
honest. Is not spring fever merely 
a mental condition? We allow our- 
selves to be convinced that the ele- 
ments have obtained a hold on us 
and we are uanble to thwart it. But 
it is not this. We have accustomed 
ourselves in accepting this mechan- 
ism as an excuse for mental and phy- 
sical laziness. And the strange part 
of it is that a great number of men 
and women accept it. 

Spring fever may be beneficial ii 
we consider that it does call some 
from their strenuous work to the 
great outdoors and gives them a 
much needed rest which all the per- 
suasions of a physician (brought tc 
no avail. But on the other hand we 
should realize that many people are 
allowing themselves to be captured 
and conquered by the demon spring 
fever. Each year it takes a stronger 
hold on them. It cultivates indif- 
ferent, dilatory habits which are 
bound to show their imprint later in 
life. 

Let us, this year, not allow spring 
fever to be all powerful. Let's try 



Rev. Dr. Elmer R. Hoke, a former 
member of Lebanon Valley's faculty, 
died March 25, at Catawba College, 
Salisbury, N. C, where he was Presi- 
dent of that college. 

He came to our campus in 1922 as 
head of the Education Department 
and remained here until 1924 when he 
was elected to the presidency at Ca- 
tawba College. 

The Faculty and Student Body 
express their sincere sympathy to his 
widow, Mrs. Mary Hoke and their 
four sons. 



The Faculty and Student Body 
wish to extend their deepest sym- 
pathy to Dr. Ohl whose mother died 
Saturday, March 28th and also to 
Mrs. Derickson whose mother died 
Wednesday, April 1st. 

We were very glad to h?.ve Dr. 
Wagner back with us this week. Due 
to an operation he had been unable 
to meet his classes for some time. 



Vacations — Where ? ? 

Miss Myers spent some time with 
friends in Baltimore, Md. 

Mis? Mary K. Wallace spent her va- 
cation with her parents in Delaware 
Ohio. 

Miss Louise Fencil visited friendf 
n Hartford, Connecticut. 

Miss Lietzau visited her aunt at 
Peekskill, N. Y. 

Miss Johnson spent her vacation 
with friends in Baltimore, Md. 

Dr. Ohl was at his home in Ard- 
more, Penna. 

Dr. Reynolds visited the University 
of Rochester where he was formerly 
a member of the faculty. 




years died at her home in Lebanon 
last Thursday, April 9, 1931. 




One of Lebanon Valley's most dis 
tinguished graduates, Horace Kep 
hart, met his death in an automobile 
accident April 6, 1931. 

Mr. Kephart graduated from Le 
banon Valley in the class of 1879. He 
is a nationally known author, famous 
for his tales of the southern mountain 
folks. 

He met his death while on a moon- 
light sight-seeing tour with Fiswoode 
Tarleton ,another southern author. A 
few miles from Bryson City, N. C, 
the machine left the road and turned 
•over several times, killing Kephart 
and Tarleton instantly. 

Kephart is the author of "Our 
{Southern Highlanders," a work of 
such historical value that it has al- 
ready been listed with American clas- 
sic literary productions. 

Mr. Kephart has the distinction in 
being listed in the "Who's Who of 
America." 



Miss Sara E. Helm who graduated 
from Lebanon Valley College in 1903 
and who was teacher and principal 
of Lebanon Schools for thirty-two 



A bad penny always returns! It 
never rains but what it pours! A 
task slowly done is a task well done, 
and other verbal adages. If the lat- 
ter is logic this column ought to be 
a "whiz" as I have been into the 
Muses for quite a spell and I haven't 
the slightest idea of what the rest of 
the contents shall contain. Maybe it 
is lack of facilities! 

This weather is enough to cloud the 
mind of any "Kolumnist" and me 
being very "Amatoorish" the affliction 
takes full affect. In the words of the 
Old Maestro, "Will you forgive met" 

Just received notice that I am sup- 
posed to participate in a "looking-for- 
butterfly-dance" in the annual May 
Day Program! Some one sure is an 
optimist! Not that I have any con- 
temption for an affair of this kind 
but me with my skinny legs that 
were moulded around a Horse's Abdo- 
men has no place in exhibitions of 
this nature! Egad! I would re 
semble the Crane, Stork or other 
species of bird that is blessed with 
elongated shanks ! 

Besides I am not talented! My 
dancing is symbolic of the Toad! My 

voice Well, we will not go into 

th^t! I never could recite poetry ex- 
cept when properly inspired! And 
that type couldn't be recited in the 
presence of more timid and modest 
individuals! 

The third and final excuse is one 
that I am most sensitive about! We 
all have our pet "weaknesses." Mine 
is especially so. My feet are too big \ 
I hate to confess this but I want to 
save myself and partner emberrass- 
ment. If I should happen to awk- 
wardly step on the pedal extremities 
of my fair partner during one wild 
gesture (which I am sure to do) the 
show would be called on account of 

"unavoidable" circumstances No 

-ir! My puppies are too mature! 

A few of the boys ar ebeginning 
to "whoop-it-up" again in regards to 
a Junior Prom. Geo. Nye, Stewart, 
Balsbaugh, Lehman and many others 
too numerous to mention. I swore I 
had washed my hands of the affair 
but if the majority want one I will 
stay in the buggy and push on the 
reigns 'til the old dash-board gives 
in! 

Regardless of what I may say 
about the proposed event there can 
be no certainty until the proper au- 
thorities warm up to the idea. So 
far there hasn't been much enthusi- 
arm displayed. Hold on! There is a 
class meeting today and many things 
may develop, so watch for further 
particulars. 

Bob McCuster the Gaelic Gent, who 
directs the forces of the Junior troops 
has told me that he wanted to set the 
date as May 16. The place, Hershey 
Park. However, this is only an da- 
vance suggestion and made before the 
authorities at Hershey Gecided to open 
the park on that night. So that seems 
to be out! Nevertheless, if enough en- 
thusiasm is shown the date and place 
will be arranged. 

George Brubaker is the spirit of 
Devotion! He likes a certain Radio 
program and buys the tooth-paste 
even tho' he says it is terrible ! 
(Much to my disgust). 

DON'T FORGET TO SAVE FOUR 
BUCKS FOR A "QUITTIE"! 

Professor Stokes our amiable in- 
structor in Business Administration, 
recently had an invitation to judge a 
debate in a neai'by high school. In- 
closed in the letter were two tickets 
one for the Prof, and the other for 
Mrs. Stokes! Are you holding out 



Prof.? I could smoke a good cigar! 

Another budding novelist has 
arisen! Chas. Kraybill is the author 
of "Love Overworked." Success to 
you Chas.! Where did you get your 
inspiration ? 

Many of the "superior" sex are 
resembling half-done Hams! Their 
faces shiny and red. Wrong again 
Watson, 'tis the aspirants for the 
baseball team! Old Sol has brought 
havoc on the beautiful complections 
of Luke Shrom, russell dennis, Bob 
Stewart, Murphy Kazulsky, Pat. Pat- 
rizio and myself! My nose is taking 
a beating and has begun to peel! 

Did you know that Charles Mum- 
mert has a pet pig named "Annie 
Laurie?" Maybe I should have put 
that in the past as "Annie" probably 
has gone the way of all Pork \ 

My congratulations may be late 
but as the Vacation came before I 
had a chance to write this column I 
want to Congratulate the entire cast 
of "Androcles and the Lion." "Speshul 
bokays" go to Shrope, Eva Peck, 
Seegar, Krumbiegel and Babe Early! 

BE SURE AND SAVE FOUR 
KOPECS j?OR A "QUITTIE." 

My room-mate has become suddenly 
enamored! He "lards" his hair now, 
perfumes hisself and forgets my mail! 
The lad used "right good jedgment" 
when he done his pickin'! 

My boss Miss Shroyer (can't call 
her by her first handle now) told me 
she liked my "shopping poetry" that 
appeared a while ago. How about a 
raise, Editoress? 

Now that I have properly bored you 
I think I shall close up the typewriter 
and ' unlax" for about three hours. I 
feel terribly dumb and hope you are 
the same. 




thfi Spanish Monarchy is no more, 
^.he rpirit of democracy has been 
■.tirring among the Spaniards for 
me time, and the latest and most 
force.ul evidence of its existence is 
the recent overthrow of the Monar- 
chist party. As a consequence, King 
Alfonso XIII has abdicated his throrie, 
and a republican form of government 
is in control. So ends another long 
line of rulers, and so arises a new re- 
public. Have you any opinion as to 
which will be the next nation to fol- 
low Spain's example? 

Our three large cities, New York, 
Chicago, and Philadelphia, have been 
the scenes of energetic house-clean- 
ings during the past few weeks. In 
Chicago, the Republican regime of 
Mayor William Hale Thompson has 
been upset, and a Democratic mayor, 
Anton Cermak, has been elected. 
Mayor Cermak promises to sweep the 
cobwebs from Chicago political ma- 
chinery. New York has been the 
scene of further reforming elements 
which seek his removal. The smiling 
Jimmy has returned to face the mu- 
sic, and it remains to be seen if his 
infectious personality can bring him 
through. The City of Brotherly Love 
has witnessed some events not espe- 
cially indicative of fraternal friend- 
ship. Judge Harry McDevitt has ap- 
pointed receivings for the Philadel- 
cause of the compasy's insolvency, 
phia Rapid Transit Company, not be- 
but because of averred maladminis- 
tration by Mitten Management, the 
concern that has been guiding very 
profitably the destiny of Philadel- 
phia's great utility. Among the en- 
dearing epithets employed by Judge 
McDevitt are "financial vultures," 
"malodorous transactions," and 
"huge swindles." 

Lovers of music will be interested 
to read that a new piano has been in- 
vented by Emanuel Moor, a Swiss 
musician. This instrument has a 
double keyboard, one above the other 
as in a two-manual organ. A key 



on the upper keyboard controls a 
tone an octave higher than does the 
corresponding key on the lower key- 
board. Among the advantages 
claimed for the new piano are: sim- 
plification of complicated finger tech- 
nique, greater richness and sonority 
because of the more extended chords 
that can be played, and a chromatic 
glissando, which is not possible upon 
an ordinary piano. 

While Sir Hubert Wilkins' submar- 
ine, the Nautilus, is traveling under 
the Arctic ice, an expedition of an en- 
tirely different nature will be attack- 
ing the summit of one of the great 
Himalaya Mountains, Mount Kermat, 
in northern India. Trie ascent of the 
25,447 foot mountain will be under- 
taken by a group of young British 
mountaineers. This expedition is at- 
tempted mainly because of the love 
of adventure which is the motive for 
most mountain-climbing, but the ex- 
plorers hope to obtain information 
concerning the source of the Ganges 
and the topography of the surround- 
ing country. The men will use special 
equipment in order to withstand the 
rigors of the fierce Indian climate, 
for in the heights to which they ex- 
pect to climb, it is entirely possible 
for a person to receive sunstroke in 
the head and frostbite in the feet at 
the same time. 

"Culture for all" seems to be the 
watchword of contemporary Ameri- 
can philanthropy. A group of men, 
acting in behalf of John D. Rocke- 
feller, Jr., have announced that they 
are going to spend $100,000,000 to 
bring culture to this country over the 
radio. Dr. Levering Tyson, of Co- 
lumbia University, and John rskine, 
authority on Helen of Troy, are lead- 
ers in the move toward a new Renais- 
sance. We expect that Haydn and 
Handel will be household words, and 
that Schopenhauer, Kant, and Hamil- 
ton will be the authors of the future 
best-sellers. 

We blush with pride on reading an 
article in the Literary Digest which 
says, "The columnist is king in the 
American newspapers to-day . . This 
specialized effort is now the best-paid 
feature of modern editorial work." 
And, dodging the missels hurled by 
our colleagues employed in other de- 
partments of the paper, we calmly 
pocket the check representing our 
munificent weekly salary. 



HISTORY CLUB ARGUES 

VALUE OF COLLEGE 



An interesting meeting of the His- 
ory Club was held Monday evening, 
March 30, in Philo Hall. The pro- 
gram consisted of a debate on the 
question, "Who Should Go to Col- 
lege?" Paul Emenheiser expostu- 
lated on the viewpoint that every- 
one should be given the privilege of 
receiving a college education. The 
opposite side of the question was up- 
held by Warren Lebo, who quoted 
the opinions of various writers i n 
support of his arguments. Both 
sides of the debate were well taken 
and showed preparation. Then fol- 
lowed an open forum in which every- 
one present was given the opportu- 
nity to voice his opinions and an in " 
teresting and thought-provoking dis- 
cussion took place. 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Thursday, April 16.— Bucknell Uni- 
versity debate. . , 

Friday, April 17.— Philo-Clio J° in 
Session. . 

Saturday, April 17.— Tennis Mate" 
—Franklin and Marshall (away)- 

Sunday, April 19.— Y. W. c - **' 
Friendly Hour, 5:45 P. M. Y. M. G 
Devotional Meeting, 5:45 P. M- & 

Wednesday, April 22.— Men's G le 
Club Concert — Scottdale. 1 

Thursday, April 23.— Y. M. c - ' 
Convention begins. Men's Cluib 
cert — Johnstown. 



4 



LA VIE COLLEGIENE, THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 1931. 



PAGE THREE 




«y" CONFERENCE 

ON CAMPUS 



PHILO DIX 



(Continued from Page 1) 



years to help the newly elected of- 
ficers in their work on the college 
campus. 

To help in the conference the fol- 
lowing Committees have been appoint- 
ed: Robert L. Roudabush, Chairman; 
j)r. R- R- Butterwick, S. Fred Christ- 
man, Robert Rawhausear, 7red Mund, 
Willard Trezise, Russell Morgan, Paul 
Emenheiser, Gardner Saylor. Pro- 
gram Committee: Lewis R. Fox, 
Chairman; Donald L. Gulden, Irwin J. 
Bright, Robert L. Roudabush, Presi- 
dent G. Morris Smith, Raymond H. 
Hallman, Harry G. Paul. Publicity 
Committee: Thomas S. Dietrich, 
Chairman; Floyd Bloom, William E. 
Holley, LeRoy Rosenberger, Bernard 
Piela, H. Wilson Sieber. Faculty Com- 
mittee: President G. Morris Smith, 
Chairamn; Dean W. E. Tilberg, Pro- 
fessor S. S. Shearer, Professor Geo. 
B. Strait, Dr. P. H. Burt, Professor 
V. Z. Zener. 




SUNDAY EVENING 

Y. M. C. A. MEETING 



The Y.M.C.A. held its first Sunday 
evening meeting under the auspices 
of the new regime on the 12th of 
April. The speaker was Paul D. 
Emenheiser, who spoke on, "Who Is 
A Christian?" Edward Shellenberger 
led devotions, and Clinton Allen was 
at the piano. One of the features 
of the meeting was a clarinet and 
saxophone duet by Harry Zeck and 
John Zeck. The meeting was spirited, 
and the singing was inspiring. There 
were about twenty fellows present, 
and the prospects are good for very- 
interesting meetings during the rest 
of the year. On the coming Sunday 
evening, Robert Roudabush will speak 
on "Does Science Help or Handicap 
Religion?" 



Philo Dix is State Secretary of the 
Y.M.C.A. in Pennsylvania and is re- 
garded as one of the foremost Asso- 
ciation leaders in the country. His 
extensive experience and his compre- 
hensive grasp of the work of the 
Y.M.C.A. gives him a place of unique 
leadership in the whole nation. 



JACK HART WILL ATTEND 
STUDENT TRAINING CONF. 



DR. HENRY H. CRANE WILL 
SPEAK AT CONFERENCE 





Rev. John (Jack) Hart will be a 
leader at the Training Conference 
that will be held at Lebanon Valley 
April 23 to 26. "Jack" Hart, as he 
is affectionately known in many col- 
leges in Pennsylvania, was a f u 
letter man while he was at college 
and also has the unique distinction 
of being a strong dynamic Christaii) 
'eader. Those who have heard hi 
nessages are imp'essed with the s.r. 
;erity and earnestness of the man. 

Rev. Hart will lead the devotional 
n Saturday and will give an ad Ires 
,n Saturday night at the Conference 
banquet on the theme "How Can M 
Life Witness for Christ?" He wil 
Uso close the conference on Sunda: 
-norn"ng with an address in th' 
United Brethren Church. 



:"Y" PROGRAM 

FOR CONFERENCE 



Enthusiastic reports are being re- 
ceived from many campuses regard- 
ing the privilege of again hearing 
D r. Henry H. Crane at the Training 
Conference. Doctor Crane is one of 
the outstanding leaders with young 
People and is eagerly sought by stu- 
dent audiences. While he was in 
college he took part in many activi- 
ties, being leader of the Glee Club, 
member of the BasketJball Squad, 
member of the Tennis Team, and a 
leader in Dramatics. 

Doctor Crane's theme at the Con- 
ference will be: "The Price of Chris- 
tian Leadership." 

Doctor Crane is Pastor of the Elm 
p ark Methodist Church at Scranton. 
•^though the Church is the largest in 
the city, the auditorium is filled to 
opacity morning and evening by 
young people as well as grown-ups 
w ho come to hear this young fearless 
leader. 



Thursday, April 23rd 

5:00-8:$$ P.M. Registration in Read 
ing Room, Engle Conservatory. 
8:30 P.M. Camp Fire Fellowship of 
Delegates. Welcome by S. Fred 
Christman. Meditation: "Personal 
Christian Leadership,'' Robert L 
Riudabush. 

i 

Friday, April 24th 

7:00 A.M. Individual Morning 
Watch. 

7:30 A.F. Berakfast in homes. 
8:30 A.M. Morning Devitions. Lead- 
er: Dr. W. C. Waltemyer. 

9:00-10:30 A.M. Opening Session. 
John C. Saylor, Presiding. 
"History and Bckargonud Ci mine 
"History and Background of the Y. 
M.C.,' by John G. Cattron. 

10:00 A.M. Intermissiin. 

10:15 A.F. Organization of the Cabi- 



net. Leader: Leo H. Kohl. 

1. How analyze our task on the 
campus; meb2rship work with 
freshmen, budget, publicity, etc. 

2. Training cabinet members; 
sources of help. 

11:16 A.M. Demonstration Cabinet 
Meeting. Leader: Irwin J. Bright. 

12:15 P.M. Dinner. 

1:30 P.M. "Cooperation with Schiol 
and Facutly," John G. Cattron, Pre- 
siding. 

Leader: Professor George B. Sti-ait. 

1. Cooperation with the Admin- 
istration; the College. 

2. The task of the faculty ad- 
visor. 

3. Cooperation with the facul- 
ty; faculty firesides, etc. 

2:30 P.M. Separate Cabinet Meet- 
ings by Colleges with Faculty Ad- 
visor. 

1. Preparing for the Y.M.C.A. 
work back on the campus. 

2. Outlining a tentative pro- 
gram for 1931-1932. 

3:00-5:30 P.M. Recreation. (Registra- 
tion if additional delegates.) 

5:45 P.M. Supper in College Dining 
Room. 

7:00 P.F. Tower Chimes. 

7:15 P.M.. Meditation: Organ Con- 
cert in United Brethren Church. 

7:S0-9:30 P.M. Evening Session. (De- 
montration Meeting in charge of 
Dickinson "Y" Cabinet.) 
Address: "The Price of Christian 
Leadership," by Henry H. Crane. 

Saturday, April 25th 

7:00 A.M. I n d i vidual Morning 
Watch. 

7:30 A.M. Breakfast in homes. 

8:30 A.M. Morning Devotions. Lead- 
er: Rev. John R. (Jack) Hart. 

J:00-10:00 A.M. Council Session. John 
C. Saylor, presiding. 

1. The place and meaning of 
the State Student Council; the 
Field Council ? 

2. How Associations receive 
help on programs, speakers, 
printed material, etc. 

10.15-11:45 A.M. Training Groups: 

1. Y.M.C.A. Officers. Presi- 
dents,, Vice-presidents, Secre- 
taries, Treasurers). Donald L. 
Gulden, Presiding. Leader: Leo 
H. Kohl. 

2. Cabinet Members and Com- 
mittee Chairmen. Lewis R. Fox, 
Presiding. Leader: Jack Cat- 
tron. 

3. Faculty Men, Faculty Ad- 
visors of College Y.M.C.A.'s. 
President G. Morris Smith, pre- 
siding. 

a. faculty leadership in the 
Y.M.C.A. on the campus. 

b. Personal work with stu- 
dents. Dean W. E. Tilberg. 

12:00 M. Conference Picture. (In 
front of North Hall). 



DR. GOSSARD 
Geirge Daniel Gossard, B.D., D.D., 
LL.D., president if Lebanon Valley 
College, where the conference is be- 
ing held. 




The United Brethren Church, Ann- 
viile, Penna., where the conference 
will be served three of its meals, and 
v.here the Friday evening and Sun- 
day morning srvices will be held. The 
pastor of this church is J. Owen 
Jones, M.A., D.D. 

This church building is one of the 
finest in the East. It is built of 
limestone throughout, and its impres- 
sive tower houses a set of chimes 
weighing six tons, and which can be 



heard at a distance of three miles. 
The church organ is of the Midemer- 
Losh make, and is equipped with full 
harp and chimes attachments. Re- 
cently the basement of the church 
was remodeled, and excellent facili- 
ties for dining arrangements are 
available. 

The Mite Society under the direc- 
tion of Miss Emma Gingrich will pre- 
pare and serve the meals for the 
members of the conference. 



12:15 P.M. Dinner. 

1:30-2:30 P.M. Special Group Ses- 
sions. 

1. Faculty Group. (Continua- 
9:00-10:30 P.M. Social Period. 

Sunday, April 26th 

7:30 A.M. I n d ividual Morning 
Watch. 



tion of morning meetings). 

2. Program Building in a De- 
nominational College. Chair- 
man, Lewis R. Fox. 

3. Program Building in a 
Teachers' College, Chairman, 
Oliver Krapf. 

2:30-3:00 P.M. Separate Cabinet 
Meetings by Colleges. (Continued). 
1. Outlining and planning pro- 
gram back on the campus. 
3:00-5:30 P.M. Recreation. Individual 
and group games. (Tennis, volley- 
ball, baseball, hikes, etc.) 

5:45-8:30 P.M. Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege Conference Banquet. 
World Outlook Emphasis. 

Chairman, President George D. 
Gossard of Lebanon Valley 
College. 

Toastmaster: Robert L. Rouda 
bush. 

Special music, college songs, 
etc. 

Address: "How Can My Life 
Witness for Christ," Rev. John 
R. Hart. 

Address: "The Message and 
Work of the Y.M.C.A.," Philo 
C. Dix. 

8:30-9:00 P.M. Meeting of State Stu- 
dent Council. 

7:45 A.M. Breakfast in homes. 
8:30 A.M. Morning Devotions: Rev 
W. C. Waltemyer. 



9:00-10:00 A.M. Dedicatory Service. 
C Saylor, Presiding. 
Installation of New Council Of- 
ficers and Members by President G. 
Morris Smith of Susquehanna Uni- 
versity. 

"Can Jesus Count on Me Back on 
the Campus?", Rev. John R. Hart. 

10:30 A.M. Closing Service in Unietd 
Brethren Church. 

Address: "Follow Me," Rev. John 
R. Hart. 




On Tuesday evening, April 14, the 
Euridice Choral Society gave a con- 
cert at the U. B. Church in Hummels- 
town. Selections by the club were 
well received as were the piano solos 
by Miss Helleman, vocal solos by 
Miss Young and 'cello solos by Miss 
Helman. After the concert the girls 
paid a visit to Indian Echo Cave 
which is located in Hummelstown. 
Their next concert will be given in 
Lebanon, April 20th. Better make 
arragements to attend this concert. 



There will be a recital at Engle 
Hall Tuesday evening, April 20th, 
8:00 P.M. 




FROSH THOUGHTS 



A CITY STREET 

This is another theme, deserving of 
attention which was written by Miss 
Fary Groff, a member of the Fresh- 
man Class. She is one of Miss Mary 
K. Wallace's pupils. 



One cold, dreary evening about a 
week before Christmas, I was saun- 
tering down Market Street toward 
Broad Street Station, wondering bow 
to put in' an hour before train time 
Darkness had just replaced twilight, 
and a wet, heavy snow was begin- 
ning to fall. Tired, bundle-laden 
Christmas shoppers were rushing for 
crowded, smelly subways, snow cov- 
ered trains, and clanging street cas. 
Dirty, ragged newsboys cried, ''Ex- 
tra, extra, all about the big murder!" 

Stamping her half-frozen feet on 
the icy pavement, a girl from the 
Salvation Army jingled her few coins 
and succeeded in attracting the at- 
tention of several passerbys by her 
tinklink bell. Negro chauffeurs drove 
their Packards and Cadillacs up to 
the curb, opened the dors for fur- 
coated ladies, and, with a honk of 
the horn, drove off again into the 
dense dinner-hour traffic. ([Forlorn 
looking stenographers and weary 
business men hailed taxis. Poor look- 
ing women peered into the cheerful 
shop windows with longing eeys. 
Happy children clung to their 
mothers' hands begging to see Santa 
Claus. 

As I reached my destination I stop- 
pe dto look into the fruit shop which 
is a few steps from the station en- 
trance. Decorated with laurel, holly 
wreaths, mistletoe, poinsetta and 
other greens, the window created a 
true holiday atmosphere. Dainty 
boxes of glazed fruit were scattered 
throughout the window. Baskgets of 
fresh fruit containing huge Maloga 
grapes, bright yellow tangerines, red- 
cheeked apples, and luscious pears 
were artistically arranged. Smill 
packages of dates and figs hidden be- 
tween two pieces of fruit suggested 
the Wise Men and the Orient. 

Two hungry looking boys of about 
nine years came up beside me in or- 
der to follow my example and take 
in the delightful sight. On my other 
side I noticed two well-dressed young 
men who were discussing what sort 
of basket they would send their 
mother for Christmas. 

The shop next to this fruit store is 
a flower store. This window was an 
exquisite summer garden in the midst 
of a snow covered street. Flowers 
of every kind were cleverly arranged 
— American Beauty roses, delicate 
sweet peas, stately gladiolas, together 
with graceful bunches of holly and 
twigs of the traditional mistletoe. 
Gay, young men selecting flowers for 
their sweethearts were going in and 
out letting out into the cold, damp 
air, the sweet odor of spring 

Finally I looked at my watch and 
decided that it was about time to 
go for my train, but before leaving 
this buzzing, crowded street with its 
wet sidewalks reflecting the brightly 
lighted store fronts, I ciuld not help 
thinking how many different types of 
people, how many different types of 
homes — happy, sad, rich, poor, mid- 
dle class — are represnted on one 
street corner in one hour. Yet, isn't 
there a certain, similarity about them 
all? Are they not all asking the 
same thing of life? 



PLANS FOR JUNIOR PROM 
EVERYONE SUPPORT IT 



Philosophers tell us that there are 
only two things that are certain 
namely; death and taxes! However, 
this afternoon the Junior class met 
and definitely decided to hold a Junior 
Prom. 



Final decison rests with the Faculty 
and from all reports no opposition 
has been offered from this quarter. 
The members of the faculty that were 
interviewed seemed to be highly in 
favor of the affair. No official action 
has been taken as yet but the out- 
look is highly favorable. 

President McCusker appointed vari 
ous committees and they have began 
to function immediately. The ques- 
tion of time and place have been 
Kinder consideration and members of 
the class are going to Hershey tomor- 
row to investigate the proper author- 
ties of the Country Club. This seems 
to be the ideal place as the spacious 
verandas and ball room provide 
ample space for amusement, both 
dancing and cards. 

This promises to be the biggest 
social affair of the season as the class 
is going to sponsor an election on the 
campus to select some lucky gentle- 
man to lead the Promenade. Each 
class will be asked to nominate a can- 
didate and a final election will be held 
at large to select the winner from the 
fjou,r candidates. The election like 
the Prom, itself, awaits faculty sanc- 
tion and the class hopes sincerely that 
both ideas meet with approval. 

The date is quite indefinite yet but 
May 8th or 9th seems to be the most 
opportune time as it does not inter- 
fere with any other function. 

This is not to be entirely a danc- 
ing party! Dancing of course will be 
in progress but we are trying to en- 
courage the non-dancing students and 
faculty to attend. Cards and other 
amusements will be on the program. 

This is the first affair of its kind 
ever to be held on the campus and 
naturally it takes a great deal of 
"Pioneering" to sponsor it. The pri- 
mary purpose is to create a greater 
feeling of friendship between faculty 
and students than already exists. All 
members of the faculty will be in- 
vited guests and we hope they will 
respond one hundred percent. 

Further particulars will be an- 
nounced from time to time so watch 
for them and let's all plan to turn 
out and have a great time. 

Class officers will be asked to hold 
meetings soon to nominate their can- 
didates for the honor of-leading the 
Promenade. 



BASEBALL TEAM IN SHAPE 
VERY GOOD PROSPECTS 



The athletic field, dormant since be- 
ing deserted by the "pigskin toters" 
once more has become a scene of ac- 
tion. Ball playing, bats cracking 
and gloves smacking announce the 
arrival of America's greatest pastime 
■ — baseball. 

The team under coach Mylin has 
been working out daily since return- 
ing fro the Easter vacation with fa- 
vorable results. This season the out- 
fit will be made up chiefly of veterans 
from last year's nine. The addition 
of a few new recruits to the roster is 
expected to strengthen the positions 
that were somewhat weaker last sea- 
son than in former years. 

Stewart, a shotstop last year, has 
been switched to catcher and is rap- 
idly rouding into shape. He has a 
good arm and is plenty reliable when 
it comes to stopping the slants. Wy- 
coff a Freshman, is showing up well 
at short although he is a little wiry 
with his peg to first. Reeder is round- 
ing out into a nice twister. He has 
plenty of curves and a nice fast ball. 
Daub and Patrizio will be our old 
reliables on the mound again this 
year. 

The opening game is scheduled for 
April 22 with Juniata at Huntingdon. 
Although it is a little early for a final 
report as to the starting line up, it 
looks as though the following nine 
will start: Dennis, first base; Trezise, 
second base; Wycoff, short stop; S. 



Among Our Seniors 




ALMA BINNER 




RUSSELL MORGAN 



ALMA BINNER 



Hail to our May Queen. Ling may 
she live! It is indeed a great honor 
to be elected queen of the May Day 
festivities but Alma is wirthy if the 
acclaim which her fellow students 
have acorded her. Quiet, gentle, and 
sweet — such is Alma. Very unassum- 
ing, she goes along her way, loved 
by all and loving all. 

As Alma commuted to school her 
first three years of study, not many 
students had the opportunity to learn 
to know her. Eut this year Alma 
lives in North Hall and has entered 



into the spirit of the dormitory life 
•with much enthusiasm. 

Of Alma we acn say she is a friend, 
a student of which we can be proud 
and a worthwhile member ofo ur be- 
loved school. We doff our hats ti the 
Queen of May. 



RUSSELL MORGAN 



Gentle am n and scholar! No two 
words could better express Moose's 
atributes. Gentleman certainly. Who 
is so base as to deny him that title. 
Scholar surely. Few men have equal- 
le himd in industry and accomplish- 



ment in the academic field. Last year 
as editor of the "Quittie" he certainly 
proved his industry. 

Also he is one of the most popular 
chaps on the campus, having hek 
presidencies in his society, class and 
clubs. 

Needless to say he is interesting 
and always sympathetic though his 
roommates deny the later character- 
istic. 

His is majoring in Biology and in- 
tends going to Med. School next year. 
"Doctor" Morgan if you please! 
Luck to you Moose! 



Light, third base; Shortledge, center 
field. The other two outfield posi- 
tions will be filled by either Patrizio, 
Daub, or Reeder, depending on the 
mound choice for the day. Kraybill, 
Williams and Gibble are showing 
gradual improvement and they are 
expected to see plenty of action dru- 
ing the season. 

The schedule: 

I 

April 22 — Juniata Away 

April 28 — Ursinus Away 

May 2 — Juniata Home 

May 9 — Ursinus Home 

May 11 — Temple Away 

May 13 — Dickinson Away 

May 16 — Susquenhanna Home 

May 20— F. M. C Away 

May 23 — Susquenhanna Away 

May 29— Mt. St. Mary's Away 

June 6 — Albright Away 

June 9 — Albright Home 



WILL DURANT ENTHRALLS 
LARGE AUDIENCE 



Befoi-e a very attentive audience, 
Will Durant, fascinated a large num- 
ber of his admirers in the Lebanon 
High School Auditorium, Wednesday 
evening, April 15, at 8:30 P.M. 

Durant based his lecture on the 
question, "Is Our Civilization Prog- 
ress?" After building up some ar- 
guments against progress which 
seemed to be almost unable to over- 
come, he proceeded to break them 
down with complete ease and proved 
conclusively that we are living in a 
progressive age, that our civilization 
is ever forging ahead. 

All those who were fortunate 
enough to hear the noted speaker are 
lou din their praises of this super 
scholar and teacher. It was indeed 
a golden oportunity to hear a great 
mind such as Durant's. 



FROSH GIRLS GUESTS 

AT DELIGHTFUL TEA 



On Wednesday afternoon Mrs. Gos- 
sard entertained the girls of the 
Freshman class at a delightful tea 
at her home. The afternoon was 
spent in cards and dancing, and en- 
tertainment by a number of Junior 
girls, to say nothing of the delicious 
refreshments which are so character- 
istic of Mrs. Gossard's teas. 

The entertainment provided by the 
Junior girls consisted of a piano solo 
by Mary H. Goshert, a vocal solo by 
Hester Thompson, a dance by Mary 
Anne Rupp and Lolita Mummert, and 
a number of very ingenious charades 
planned by Elizabeth Flook. 

Refresments were then served, 
Mary Anne Rupp and Elizabeth Flook 
pouring. After a number of very en- 
joyable dances the guests took their 
leave, having found their first tea at 
the home of Dr. and Mrs. Gossard 
an altogether enjoyable and not soon- 
to-be-forgotten occasion. 



FILIPISO IN ADDRESS 

STRESSES MISSIONS 



During the chapel program on Fri- 
day, April 10, the student body was 
afforded an opportunity of hearing 
two inteersting addresses by Rev. H. 
P. Widdoes and Mr. Julian P. Bacalzo. 

Rev. Widdoes is engaged in mission 
work in the Philippine Islands. In a 
short talk, he told of some of his ex- 
periences in the islands, and of the 
unexpectedly great degree of success 
which attended the efforts of his col- 
leagues and himself. He then intro- 
duced his pupil, Mr. Bacalzo, who is 
a native Filipini, and who has re- 
ceived his higher education at Bone- 
brake Seminary. 

Mr. Bacalzo gave an excellent ad- 
dress, in which he related interesting- 
facts concerning the Filippinos, tell- 
ing of their origin, their social con- 



ditions, and the benefit they derive 
from American rule and from the 
Christian missions in the islands. 

The speakers made quite clear the 
need there is for further mission ac- 
tivity in the Philippines. It is to be 
hoped that their addresses will turn 
the attention of Lebanon Valley stu- 
dents toward foreign mission work in 
the islands. 



ET CETERA 



"Training for ' Perosnal Leader- 
ship," is teh theme of the Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet Training Conference. No 
more approprite note could be sound- 
ed, for on nearly every campus new- 
ly elected officers are being installed 
for the year 1930-31. This confer- 
ence will acquaint them with their 
responsibilities as well as their op- 
portunities. Men who have had ex- 
tensive experience in "Y" work will 
lead the conference in speaking and 
conducting of traiig groups. It will 
be with characters such as "Jack' 
Hart, Philo Dix, Hery H. Crane, and 
Leo H. Kohl that much inspiration 
shall be obtained. 

At a recent business meeting of the 
local Y. M. C. A. it was decided t0 
register the entire cabinet. It is 
hoped that other colleges will follow 
suit. Plans are being made f° r 
healthy recreational periods, ard all 
delegates are expected to bring some 
old clothes suitable for play. A fea- 
ture of especial interest will be an 
informal concert of the Lebanon Val- 
ley College Glee Club. They will 
sing on aSturday evening after the 
banquet under the direction of P 1 ' ^' 
Alexander Crawford. 

The students and faculty are look- 
ing forward with much enthusiasm 
and great anticipation to the guests 
which will be with us during the con- 
vention. When the delegates arr| v 
on our campus, a warm reception 
awaits them. 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 1931. 



PAGE FIVE 



gull: When did you start studying 
f r that class? 

Scotty: Ever since the "prof.' - ' 
threatened to kick me out. 



Did you hear about the big, big 
ke-man on our campus who calls his 
society pin "Soldier" because it has 
been on so many fronts. 



Jack: Something seems to be wrong 
w ith this engine, it . 

Jill: Don't be silly, wait until we 
get off the main road. 



with some of your quaint college 
yells. 



Driver of Collegiate Car: Do you do 
repairing here? 

Garage Owner: Yeah, but we don't 
do manufacturing. 



Tony Reeder told me that now that 
the "Stein Song" has enjoyed so 
much popularity, a ballad ought to 
be written to the Yale Bowl. 



If you can't carry your liquor, send 
it back. 



Billie: What ya writing? 
Glo: A joke. 

Billie: Send him my love. 



Fred: Where are you going? 
Bill: Library. What are you going 
to do? 

Fred: Oh, I'll get my date over the 
'phone. 



Buyer: How much milk does that 
cow give ? 

Farmer: I don't rightly know, but 
she's a darn good natured critter and 
she'll give all she can. 



Mother: I'm afraid Robert is burn- 
ing the candle at both ends. 

Father: Huh ! That boy has cut the 
candle in half and lit up all four ends. 



If all true confession writers were 
placed side by side against a well, 
they'd still be lying. 



Speg: I don't like the flies in here. 
Mr. Hall: Sorry, there'll be some 
new ones tomorrow. 



I loved a girl, and she loved me, 
too. At least, she said so. But she 
said she would never marry me until 
her father gave his consent. Well, I 
(followed this girl around for ten 
years, and kept looking for her old 
man. And then I found out that 
her old man died when she was born 
Can you beat it? 



She was so dumb she thought 
noodle soup was a kind of shampoo 



The recent Congressional inquiry 
into Prohibition seems to have proved 
three things: The wets are wet, the 
drys are dry, and the bootleggers are 
prosperous. 



There was the absent-minded pro- 
fessor's wife who found the profes- 
sor kissing one of his prettiest and 
youngest students, and she laughed 
and laughed because she knew the 
professor was so absent-minded. 



With most movie actors, when 
they're asked to take a dangerous 
role, it's doubles or quits. 



Freshman: He is all the world to 
me. What would you advise me to 
do? 

Senior: See a little more of the 
world, my dear. 



It seems the diffeernce between 
Burlesque and Art is Earl Carroll. 



She: The minute he kissed me I 
knew he played a trombone. 



She also wonders if it is possible 
to die in a living-room. 



Y. W.-Y. M. NOTES 



friendly, informal spiiit prevailed 
that is present among Campfire Girls 
pr other out-door girls in their meet- 
ings. The girls formed a "campfire 
circle" on the floor, and evetyone 
participated freely" in the meeting, 
favorite songs and hymns were sung., 
and favorite passages of Scripture 
were recited. Instead of formal, spe- 
cielly prepared talks, each girl was 
invited to take part in a discussion, 
which centered about the question: 
"Where do we find God, and what is 
He?" It was found to be the experi- 
ence of most of the girls that they 
find God especially present just at 
this spring season of the pear, in the 
out-of-doors with Nature, a glorious 
and beautiful example of His power 
and goodness. The belief was ex- 
pressed that God is love, and that it 
is easy to have faith in His goodness 
when life runs smoothly and we are 
happy, but that on the other hand, 
hardship and troubles strengthen and 
deepen one's faith in God. It wa- 
also noted that to understand ana 
appreciate Him fully man must striv. 
to be like Him, for understanding and 
appreciation are strengthened ~ by 
similarity of character and person- 
ality. 

Other numbers were a piano solo. 
"Moonlight on the Hudson" by Ruth 
CaJble, and a poem, "A Dwelling 
Place," read by Henrietta Wagner. 



Then there is the (Frosh who won- 
dered whether the B. & 0. Railroad 
fired their employees who used Life- 
buoy Soap. 



Dad: Your studies are suffering, 
s °n. Do you need a coach? 
Son: No, Dad, a roadster'll do. 



In a real small town you can trust 
ev en the traffic ights. 



Little Girl: Auntie, why do you put 
Powder on your face? 

Aunt: To make me pretty, dear. 

Little Girl: Then why doesn't it, 
auntie dear? 



A college graduate is a person who 
a d a chance to get an education. 



Absent-minded College Professor 
( af ter a date): We'll go on from here 
ne *t time! 



This Week's Tragedy: The Scotch- 
man who found that he had to major 
n a course of Liberal Arts. 



Time: Vacation. 

Place: The family reunion at Aunt 
anny's. 

S Peaker: The college student's 
Mother. 

Mother: Now, Percy, entertain us 



The topic of the Y.W.C.A. Friendly 
^Elour Service of Sunday evening, 
March 29, was that of Easter. A spe- 
cial feature of the meeting was a 
choir which rendered pleasing musical 
numbers. 

The meeting was opened by a selec- 
tion, "The Day of Resurrection," sung 
by the choir. As Scripture lesson Ar- 
line Heckrote read Matt. 27:1-10, 
followed by prayer, lead by Eva 
Peck. Naomi Shively gave a well- 
prepared talk on "What Easter Gave 
the World," in which she emphasized 
the fact of Christ's reality and what 
He means to us through Easter. She 
also stressed the importance of Easter 
in relation to all phases of Christian- 
ity, and the message of the cross, — 
sacrifice, — of which it has come to be 
a symbol. There followed another 
selection by the choir, "Christ the 
Lord is Risen Today." Henrietta 
Wagner gave a short talk in which 
she interpreted the meaning of Easter 
as a gift in which we receive a new 
hope, and new life. The final number 
of the program was a poem, "I Too 
Shall Bear a Cross," read by Mildred 
Christiansen. 

A splendid opportunity was given 
on Wednesday morning, just before 
the Easter holiday for students to 
enter into the true spirit of Easter, 
tion was made to seem more real, 
more personal and vital in a short 
but very effective program presented 
by the Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. 

The opening number of the program 
A short dawn service was held in 
North Hall parlor from 6:30 to 7:00 
o'clock. The coming Easter celebra- 
was a saxophone solo by Richard 
Slaybaugh. The Easter story as found 
in Matthew 28 was read by Luella 
Heilman. A mixed choir sang "Day 
of Resurrection," which selection was 
followed by prayer by Harry Zech. 
Kathryn Mowrey gave a short talk 
in which she brought out the spiritual 
significance of Easter. In the last 
number of the program Margaret 
Lehn gave a very beautiful reading 
on "Easter" in which the true mean- 
ing of that holy day was presented. 

In the Y.W.C.A. Friendly Hour 
Service on Sunday evening the same 



The first general Y.M.C.A. meeting 
under the new administration was 
held on Sunday. April 12, at 5:45 P.M. 
in the Men's Dormitory. 

Mr. Paul Emenheiser, newly ap- 
pointed devotional chairman, oenduct- 
ed the meeting. Edward Shellenber- 
ger had charge of devotions. Harry 
Zech and John Zech then rendered a 
saxophone-clarinet duet. Their talent 
was much enjoyed by those present. 

Mr. Emenheiser gave an interesting 
talk on "Who is a Christian?" He 
pointed out the value of following 
Christ rather than worshipping him 
like an idol. His discussion was an 
inspiration for better living. 

The meeting was closed with a few 
sentence prayers. The program of 
speakers has been arranged complete- 
ly for the remainder of the year. It 
is hoped that the male students will 
renew their interest in the Y.M.C.A. 
and cooperate by attending as many 
of the meetings as possible. 



TOURIST BELL PHONE 

ACCOMMODATIONS ANNVILLE 69-R-13 

YE COZY INN, H. C. COFFROATH, Prop. 
Wm. Penn Highway, 4 Miles West of Lebanon, Pa. 
We Cater To Private Parties and Banquets 
Special Dinners and A La Carte Service 
Ample Parking Space We Serve With a Smile 



Worthwhile 
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for the Student 

HUMANITY UPROOTED. 

By Maurice Hindus 

UNCLE SAM'S ATTIC. 
An Intimate Story of Alaska 

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THE AMERICAN LEVIATHAN 
The Republic in the Machine Age 
By William and Charles Beard 

CLEMENCEAU. 

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$5.00 

UNIVERSITIES. 

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By Abraham Flexner 
$3.75 

ELIZABETH BARRET 
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By Louise Schultz Boas 
$3.50 

THE ENDURING QUEST. 

A Search for a Philosophy 
of Life 

By H. A. Overstreet 
$3.00 

BOLLMAN'S 

33 South Eighth Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 




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EASY ELECTRIC WASHER 
COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 

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328 W. iMain St. Phone 6R3 



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NEW LINE OF FROCKS 
AND GOWNS 

Rose Singer Shop 

761 Cumberlad Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



ISN'T IT 

TIME 
YOU • • • 




TELEPHONED 

fJMother and Dad 



Pay Them a 

VOICE VISIT 

Tonight 

Take a trip back home tonight. No need 
for railroad tickets. Just go to the near- 
est telephone, give the Operator your 
home telephone number — and in a very 
few moments you'll be there, talking 
with Mother and Dad. 
It's next best to actually seeing them! 
Make it a habit to call up the folks once 
a week. Have a regular telephone date 
with them. Fix a day and hour for your 
call. 

The cost is small — and the charges can 
be reversed if you wish. 




PAGE SIX 



LA VIE CO L LEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 1931. 



SHAW'S COMEDY GIVEN; 
"ANDROCLES AND LION" 



(Continued from Page 1) 



when suddenly they heard the fierce 
roaring of a lion. Megaera imme- 
diately fainted from fright but An- 
drocles, a lover of animals, gradually 
conquered his fear, approached the 
lion, and discovered that the cause ot 
its agonized groans was a thorn in 
its paw. After several unsuccessful 
attempts, he finally succeeded in pull 
ing out the thorn, thus making the 
lion his grateful friend. Then the 
action changed to the road to Rome 
where the christians were gathered 
under Roman guards, ready to he 
taken to the arena. The different 
types of Christianity were presented 
by Ferrovius, a hulking brute of a 
man, who had a hard time controlling 
his impetuous and violent nature, 
Lavinia, a mild and sweet-tempered 
woman with unwavering faith, ana 
Spintho, the weak-willed coward, 
whom the thought of the arena drives 
mad. The captain of the guards of- 
fered pardon to Lavinia if only she 
would become his wife, but she re- 
fused and the christians were led on 
the space behind the Emperor's box 
at the Coliseum, where the perform- 
ers assemble before entering the 
arena. Here Caesar entered tne 
scene to see what was the cause of 
the delay. As the next victim, Fer- 
rovius was sent into the arena. Ter- 
rible reports were brought back which 
led the christians to believe that Fer- 
rovius was being slain, so Androcles 
in a frenzy of self-sacrfice rushed 
forth to offer himself as a victim. 
Later, however, JJ'errovrus entered 
with a bloody sword, declaring that 
he had slain the lion. 

The next scene showed Androcles 
and the lion together in the aiena. 
The lion happened to be the same one 
whose acquaintance Androcles had 
made earlier in the play and miracu- 
lously it remembered Androcles for 
the kind deed he had done and re- 
sponded with roars of delight to the 
recognition. 

Androcles proudly led the beast into 
Casear's presence, which at once 
caused a return of its ferocious na- 
ture. But at a word from Androcles 
it immediately became quiet and gen- 
tle as a child. Thinking that the 
christians must have some miracu- 
lous power over wild beasts, Caesar 
called in the rest of them and told 
them that he had decided to give them 
their freedom out of the goodness of 
his heart. 

The play ended happily for all, es- 
pecially for Lavinia and the Captain, 
who were finally free to give and re- 
ceive their mutual love. 

The humor interspersed among the 
more or less serious parts proved 
highly entertaining and the play as 
a whole was received with much en- 
thusiasm. Clarence Early and Walter 
Krumbeigle in the title roles left 
nothing to be desired, and Misses Eva 
Peck and Trula Koch in the two lead- 
ing feminine roles of Lavinia and 
Megaera, the wife of Androcles. 
showed excellent interpretation. Leo- 
nard Shrope as Ferrovius and Wil- 
liam Seeger as Spintho, enacted their 
parts with vivid reality. The whole 
cast was indeed very well chosen and 
the perfection of the performance at- 
ested to the superior coaching as 
well as to the native ability in the 
actors and actresses. The entire cast 
in the order of their appearance was 
as follows: 

Lion Walter Krumbeigle 

Megaera Trula Koch 

Androcles , Clarence Early 

Centurion Earl Frey 

Roman Soldiers 
Peter Kandrat 



Leonard Volkins 
Carl Long 
Lavinia Eva Peck 

Christians 

Mary Buffington 

Naomi Shively 

Kathryn Mowrey 

Alfred Kuhnert 

Ben Geyer 

George Klitch 

Captain Joseph Hutchinson 

Lentuius tercy Clements 

Metelius Arnold Pipilen 

r'errovius Leonard Shiope 

ripmtho William Seeger 

Ux-L»nver John Todd 

itettonus Aivin Kinney 

tfecutor Lee Stone 

Glaaiators 

Abram Bower 

Robert Hughes 

Albert Kazlusky 

Editor George Derickson 

^.all-Boy George Shirk 

Menagerie Keeper William Speg 

oaesar Allen Buzzeli 

After the piay the audience was in- 
vited to tne reception herd in tne 
Alumni gymnasium, wnich was ar- 
tistically decorated with a canopy of 
red and yellow crepe paper streamers 
and an illuminated Kaio seal at one 
end. Bridge lamps threw soft light 
for dancing, and nere and there about 
the room were davenports and chairs 
for those who did not care to dance, 
xtefresfiments of cake and ice-cream 
added the finishing touches to a de- 
iignttui evening. 

Kalo deserves the highest praise 
for this anniversary program which 
was one of tne big events of the 
school year. 

The chairmen of the committees on 
arrangement were as follows: Gen- 
eral Chairman, Charles Salek; Play, 
Russell Morgan; Piogram and Tick- 
ets, Robert Roudabush; Invitation, 
George Becker; Decoration, William 
Spangler; Refreshment, Morton 
Early; Music, Alexander Grant, Pro- 
perties, John Morris; Head Usher, 
Earl Hoover. 



A -l SKIL, 
WORKS VOMERS 




BEFORE ^ Wi AFTER 

AHNVILL 



207 W. Main 



CHEMISTS IN BALTIMORE 
VISIT ALCOHOL PLANTS 



(Continued from Page 1) 



atio that might be possible. The fu- 
uue cnemists showed a great deal ox 
interest and ah say tnat tne venture 
was a great success in every respect. 

.Disbanding alter tne vast tnrough 
the plants, various parties were 
loremd tnat tooic in many historical 
anu other spots oi inteerst in tne 
city, in tne case oi tne early even- 
ing they started OacK — an glad lor 
tne trip and tnnilea witn tne new 
expenences arrorded tnem Dy the or- 
ganization. 

Tne Cnemistry Club, one of the 
most enthusiastic organizations on 
tne campus, is carrying on its wprK 
witn renewed vigor tnis year, ine 
members nave made previous trips 
to points oi interest to the future 
cnemists and are planning on many 
more, xhey are resoived tnat experi- 
ence anu actual observation aids in 
tne conquest of cnemicai knowledge 
a/iu are out to obtain tneir snare. 



TENNIS TKAM TO PLAY 

SATURDAY AT K. & M. 



The Tennis team opens its season 
at r . oi M. Saturday aiternoon, April 
itttn. 'iney were scneduied to play 
x>onebraKe ineoiogical seminary oi 
j^ayton, unio, nere rriaay the 17th, 
out tne Dayton team cancelled due 
to some mixup unknown to the mana- 
ger. 

ihe team tis year is showing great 
spirit and is expected to make a fa- 
vorable snowing against all opposi- 
tion. A tough schedule has been ar- 
ranged and tne best play possible 
will be necessary to keep up the good 
lecorus establisned by the teams of 
former years. Last year the team 



H. GOODMAN SONS 

29 W. Sheridan Ave. 

Real Refreshments in a 
Real Way 

Ice Cream, Cakes and Pies 



Grimm s Book Store 



We Have an Interesting 
Circulating Library 

Read our New Books at a 
Very Small Charge 

SENIORS 

Now is a good time to order 
NAME CARDS 



LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. V W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 

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lost only one match and that was by 
a 6-5 decision to F. & M. on their own 
court. 

The first home match Is with Eliza- 
bethtown College on April 24th. Ten- 
is is rapidly becoming one of the 
fastest sports in college circles and 
each year competition becomes 
keener. The college team this year 
is putting forth a great real of en- 
ergy to give L. V. C. another win- 
ning sport. They ask your support 
and deserve it. 

The coach, P»of. Steivensin, an- 
nounces the probable lineup for the 
first match Saturday with F. & M. 
in Lancaster: Singles: Donmoyer, 
Hutchinson, Rank, Miller, Bower and 
Letham. Doubles: Donmoyer and 
Hutchinson; Miller and Rank; Bowers 
and Letham. 



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GET READY ! 
JUNIOR PROM ! 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



WELCOME 
"Y" DELEGATES ! 



VOLUME VIII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 2:5, 1931 



No. 6 



Junior Prom To Be Big Event - Opie Cates To Play 



JUNIOR PROM 
TO BE HELD 

HERSHEY BALLROOM 
CHOSEN DEFINITELY 
AS PLACE 



EURYDICE, GLEE CLUB 
ENTERTAIN IN LEBANON 



Since the announcement of a Junior 
Prom, in last week's "La Vie", in- 
terest in the affair has become "red- 
hot" and the various committees have 
been doing noble work. The place 
and music has been secured. Tnere 
is no need for me to tell you where, 
when and how — that is history by 
this time. 

Members of the faculty have been 
coidially invited and they have shown 
plenty of enthusiasm and if the stu- 
dents and alumni show half as much, 
the party will be a huge success. 

The ticket sale has begun and all 
students are asked to see either James 
Frevola or Allen Shortledge at once 
and signify intention of attending. 
Each student is also asked to invite 
friends from home. Prospective stu- 
dents would be more than welcome ! 
If you have a brother or sister at 
home invite them to this aifair. It 
will be the biggest event on the school 
social calendar! 

The Grand Promenade itself will be 
worth the price of admission — not to 
mention the fact that card tables will 
be erected for non-dancing patrons to 
spend a pleasant evening at their pet 

diversion. 

The Juniors have begun a big un- 
dertaking and with the cooperation of 
each and every student the affair 
can be made to pay. We ask your 
support as we know you will never re- 
great the price paid. The admission 
Price has been made within the limits 
of all. The objective is not to make 
money but neither do we want a loss. 
So again we beg of you to come and 
help the Juniors sponsor this party. 

The ladies of the Campus have de- 
cided that they will go formal while 
the Gents, are favoring sport clothes. 
This is not a command however, 
merely a suggestion. 

We ask that all who are attending 
to please be on time! As the Grand 
Promenade will be the initial event, 
an d all patrons should be on time so 
fl o delay will be made in starting. 
The hours will be announced later, so 
w atch for further developments. 

Remember, if you have a friend, 
brother or sister bring them with an 
escort and get your reservations in 
early! We desire to know as soon as 
Possible just how many will attend. 

This will no doubt be the last "big" 
a ffair before graduation. 

A tip to the fellows— If you haven't 
a girl friend better get your "bid" in 
early! 



In a very delightful concert, the 
Eurydice Choral Club and the Men's 
Glee Club of Lebanon Valley College, 
entertainel the members of the Wom- 
an's Club in Lebanon, Monday even- 
ing at 8:30 P. M. 

Choice selections from the pro- 
grams of both clubs were presented in 
a very pleasing manner. The clubs 
alternated with numbers which made 
the program particularly novel. 

After the concert, the women 
served light refreshments which were 
enjoyed by everyone. A pleasant 
hour was then spent in dancing. 



1. V. G. DEFEATED 
IN TENNIS 



BLUE AND WHITE LOSE 
WITH F. & M. 
6-3. 



The "La Vie" extends its sinc- 
ere sympathy to Emily Brandt 
and Chester Goodman whose 
mothers passed away very 
recently. 



V;. 



The tennis team fell before the 
powerful E. and M. outfit 6-3 last 
Saturday in Lancaster. It was the 
opening game for the L.V.C. team and 
top form had not yet been reached. 
The boys played a good game but the 
Lancaster lads were a little too 
speedy. 

Donmoyer playing first man defeat- 
ed Hazeltine of F. and M. 6-4, 2-6, 
6-2; Hutchinson lost to his man 6-0, 
6-2. Ranck playing third man defeat- 
ed his man by a decision score; Mil- 
ler lost to Von Seldenic 6-2, 6-4; 
Bower playing his first game for L. 
V.C. came thru and defeated his op- 
( continued on page four) 

L. V. C. SUCCESSFUL IN 

BRIDGEWATER DEBATE 



Lebanon Valley College defeated 
Bridgewater College, of Virginia, in 
a debate held in Philo hall on Wed- 
nesday, April 15, at 8:00 P.M. The 
debate was on the question: Resolved, 
That the states adopt a system of 
compulsory unemployment insurance. 

Lebanon Valley upheld the affirma- 
tive side of the question, while 
Bridgewater defended the negative. 
The Lebanon Valley team was com- 
posed of Gerald Heilman, Kathryn 
Mowrey, and Herman Mariano, alter- 
nate, while Bridgewater was repre- 
sented by Austin Feaster and Martin 
Myers. Prof. Behney acted as chair- 
man. 

The judging of the debate was in- 
trusted to Dr. Stone, assistant state 
geologist. Dr. Stone, when the de- 
bate was finished, made a speech in 
which he gave desstructive criticism 
of the matter, form, and delivery em- 
ployed by both teams, and concluded 
by awarding the decision to Lebanon 
Valley. 

This type of decision, by means of 
a single expert judge, was a new de- 
parture as far as Lebanon Valley was 
concerned, but the large audience was 
well pleased with the method, which 
makes patent the reasons on which 
the decision is based. 



NO DECISION DEBATE 

WITH BUCKNELL 



On Friday, April 17, Lebanon Val- 
ley College debated against Bucknell 
University on the question: Resolved, 
That the states adopt a system of 
compulsory unemployment insurance. 
The debate was held in Kalo hall be- 
fore a fairly large audience. 

Lebanon Valley, who upheld the af- 
firmative, was represented in con- 
structive argument by Gerald Heil- 
man and Kathryn Mowiey, while 
Herman Mariano took Mr. fieilman s 
place in the rebuttal. I' he Bucknell 
team, which argued the negative side 
of the question, was composed of 
Messrs. Ginsburg and Cook. Prof. 
M. L, Stokes, coach of debating, was 
chairman. 

As this was a no-decision debate, 
there were no judges. However, the 
debaters threw themselves into their 
speeches with all the ardor that would 
be expected in a debate for the state 
championship. The Bucknell men ex- 
hibited an unusual forensic style in 
that they devoted the greater part of 
their main speeches to the rebuttal 
of points which our team had ad- 
vanced. This threw the affirmative 
on the defensive, but our debaters 
came through excellently. 



DEAN'S BIRTHDAY 
CELEBRATED 

W. S. G. A. GIVES PARTY 
TO MADAME 
GREENE 



North Hall parlor was the scene 
of a delightful gathering on Thurs- 
day evening, April 16, when the 
Women's Student Government Asso- 
ciation held a birthday party for the 
Dean of Women, Mrs. Mary C. Green 
The girls of the three dormitories, 
day student representatives, Miss 
Leitzau and Miss Myers were present 
to help Mrs. Green celebrate. 

After the group had assembled, 
Miss Caroline Fisher, President of the 
W. S. G. A. presented the Dean with 
a gorgeous basket of spring flowers 
which held a hidden envelope con- 
taining a gold piece. 

A delightful program furnished en- 
tertainment. Mary K. Goshert, ex- 
hibiting her usual grace at the piano 
together with her excellent technique, 
played an "Impromptu" by Chopin 
"Sleepy Hollow Tune" was beautifully 
sung by Hester Thompson, after 
which a group of Freshman girls pre- 
sented a short but lively pajama 
Continued on Page 4) 



CLIO'S ELECT OFFICERS 

FOR SPRIiw SEASON 



At a special meeting of the Clionian 
Literary society, Friday noon, April 
-0, the fourth term officers were 
elected. 

The results of the eletcion reported 
Esther Mae Hower, president; Ann 
Kiehl, vice-president; Dorothy Gar- 
oji', recording secretary; Katherine 
xvrebs, corresponding secretary; Mir- 
iam Owen, critic; Lucille Engle, chap- 
lin; Charlotte Weirich, pianist. 

Under the competant leadership of 
Miss Hower and the cooperation d 
the remainder of the officers, Clio is 
looking forward to an interesting and 
lively spring term. 



FROSH SWIM 
INJUITTIE 

SOPHS WINNERS IN TUG 
FROSH LOSE IN 
BOOK PULLS 



Again tradition was upheld on the 
Lebanon Valley Campus on Monday 
afternoon, April 20. The Sophomores 
and the v^rosh clashed their brutal 
strength together in the annual tug 
of war. 

Cheering co-eds, bright colors, pho- 
tographers and officials, thronged the 
famous banks of the "Quittie" to see 
the Frosh defeated. 

It was one of the best days ever 
in the history of Lebanon Valley for 
the tug. Other years the tug was al- 
ways held in the fall, but the pull 
was postponed this year, due to in- 
convenient happenings. 

The Men's Senate acted as officials, 
and after a slight delay the gun went 
oil and twenty young men strained 
muscles. The first pull ended sud- 
denly with the Sophs victorious. 

The second pull began anl specta- 
tors settled down for a long event. 
But they were foiled. The Sopho- 
mores with the aid of their coach, 
Willard Trezise and good "spirit," 
pulled the fighting Frosh into the 
whirling waters. 

The whole aifair did not last more 
than a half-hour and once again the 
"Quittie" was not cheated of her vic- 
tories, and she seemed to splash away 
satisfied. 



BRITISH DISCUSSED 

IN HISTORY MEETING 



The regular bi-monthly meeting of 
the History Club was held on Thurs- 
day evening, April 16th, in Philo Hall. 
The subject of the evening was "The 
British in India." Alvin Kinney dis- 
cussed the question from the view- 
point that they should get out while 
Walter Krumbeigel upheld the point 
that they should stay in India. Both 
speakers cited convincing examples 
for and against the British. After 
they had presented their arguments 
the meeting was thrown open for 
general discussion. 



OPIE CATES AT 
JUNIOR PROM 

CALIFORNIANS TO PLAY 
BIG CROWD EXPECTED 
MAY 8 



Possibly the above banner doesn't 
cause any tingling or palpitation of 
tne heart but if we were situated on 
tne Western shores of our country it 
would cause a furore (especially 
among tne women of the campus) 
mat would shake tne foundation of 
tne' staid ola Administration Build- 
ing! 

r iom a list of twenty-five musical 
^/ifcjiuii/iciia^iio tne committee cnoose 
tub Dand after mucii consideration, 
reisunai eiiuoisenicnts, pieos notices 
^nu uic: iauio were urougnt into tne 
meeting. Ail persons in autnonty 
ieei very fortunate in securing the 
services of this group of music-mak- 
ers. 

Cates himself is a double for 
Charles (..Buddy) Rogers of cinema 
fame. In fact these two gentlemen 
were chosen from their respective 
schools for the Paramount Pictures 
award and a years schooling in ij.»lly- 
wood. Cates prefermg to divert his 
attentions to music, ie.it the Para- 
mount school and entered the Univer- 
sity of California where he grauuated. 
riis orchestra is composed of ail coi- 

(Continued on Page 4) 



WHO WILL LEAD PROM? 

ELECTIONS SOON 



Now that the Junior Prom, seems 
to be a ' sure fire" event the question 
arises who is to have tne honored 
position of leading the grand prome- 
nade ? 

The class met today and decided 
that the list of candidates would be 
selected from the male element of the 
Junior class by each class in school. 
To be more specific, each class will 
meet and pick the most logical man 
it thinks best. A general election will 
be held in Chapel to decide between 
the four nominees. This gives the 
whole school a chance to help share 
in this added feature. A board of 
election will be chosen and it will have 
complete charge of the balloting. The 
candidates are to be judged on their 
personality and popularity, on and 
off the campus. 

All students of the college are 
urged to meet when their class de- 
cides on their respective selection so 
that each and every one will have his 
part in the election. So get busy and 
start campaigning for your favorite! 
Remember your vote may control the 
election! 

The final outcome of this contest 
is to be withheld until the grand 
promenade begins! That ought to 
arouse your sense of curiosity to the 
highest pitch and the contest prom- 
ises to be very interesting. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 2:5, 193: 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

1 weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Kulh Shroyer, '32 Kditor-in-Chief 

Fred Mund, '32 Associate Editor 

Hilda D. Buckley, '32. .Associate Editor 
Ann Augusta Ksbenshade, '32 

Associate Editor 
Walter Krumbiegel, '33, 

Managing Editor 

ItEl'ORTORIAL STAFF 
Elizabeth Ulrich, '32 
Edward Shellenberger, '33 
Edmund Umberger, '34..Gen'l Reporter 
Dorothy Garber, '32. . . . General Reporter 

George Snowhill, '34 k Conservatory 

Percy Clements, '33 Athletics 

Jane Muth, '33 Clionian 

Arline Heckrote, '33 Delphian 

Clarence Earley, '33 Kalozetean 

Chester Goodman, '33 Philokosmian 

Gloria Lavanture, '33.. Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Robert Rawhouser, '32, 

Business Manager 

Herman Mariano, '33, 

Ass't Business Manager 
Paul Kleinfelter, '32, 

Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



REVEILLEZ— VOUS ! ! ! 



One of the most delightful pastimes 
prevalent on the campus is that of 
sleeping- in classes. Students meander 
into their respective recitation rooms, 
take their accustomed places, listen 
very attentively for a few minutes 
until they feel in the right mood and 
then promptly fall into a light dose 
or nap. Occasionally one may open 
his leit eye and glance to the front 
of the room in order to see if the 
"prof" is aware of the sleeping act. 
Ii the student thinks he is being 
watched, he will blink both eyes with 
all his might and exert himself to 
remain awake for the next few min- 
utes until the instructor's attention 
has been called to some other offend- 
er. But this state of "wide-awake- 
ness" does not remain long. The 
power of Morpheus is very great and 
soon the head drops, the eye lids fall 
and one more student is enjoying 
sweet slumber. 

What a predicament! The student 
is learning nothing. How would it 
be possible for him to do so when he 
is absolutely unconscious of what is 
transpiring in the class room. And 
of course the professor is flattered 
that his voice is conducive to restful 
naps. 

Wake up, students! Do you realize 
that you are spending over half of 
your lives in sleep. Yes, you are 
sleeping your lives away. Get your 
rest at night and be courteous enough 
to come to class with your eyes open, 
if not your mind. Everything awakes 
in the spring. Why not you ! 



ITS ALIVE 



What! Nothing else but the 1932 
"Quittapahilla". Believe it or not, 
but the book is nearing completion 
and it will soon appear on the cam- 
pus as one of the best "Quitties" 
ever published, if not the best. As 
far as content, theme, novelty, etc., 
is concerned, it is unsurpassed. 

The theme is that of the pioneer 
and the art work featuring this 
thought is par excellence. The pho- 
tographs of the respective upper 
classmen are exceptionally good. And 
as for the snapshots, wait until you 
see them! 

Nye and his staff have worked like 
Trojans for the past several months 
in order for this book to become a 
thing of reality. Their work if fin- 



ished. It is now up to YOU and 
YOU to finish the task by ordering a 
"Quittie." If you are a student at 
L. V. C. you should not hesitate one 
moment — you are a part of the book. 
If you are an alumnus, it will bring 
back old memories and make your 
Alma Mater seem dearer than ever. 

So. students, friends, alumni, take 
advantage of this opportunity to buy 
a stupendous production. In several 
days the circulating manager, Paul 
Kleenfelter, will begin an extensive 
sales campaign. Help him by order- 
ing a book. Remember, Seniors and 
Alumni, you were once Juniors. And 
Freshmen and Sophomores, your 
turn will soon be here. ' We need co- 
operation. 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIBMA 
DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



On Friday evening, April 17, the 
doors of Delphian Literary Society 
were thrown open in welcome to their 
Kalo brethren. The hall was beau- 
tifully decorated for the occasion with 
potted plants and flowers. Delphian's 
president, Caroline Fisher, presided 
over the session and after a short 
speech of welcome by her, a very en- 
joyable program was presented. 

Evangeline Salorio as "Loose 
Ankles" gave a very clever and real- 
istic interpretation of a Bowery 
dancer to the tune of "East Side, 
West Side," played by Mary K. 
Goshert. This was not an initial per- 
formance by "Vanzy" as a dancer on 
our campus, so nothing more needs 
to be said about her abiilty along this 
line. 

"Just Two Kids," Hester Thompson 
as a little country boy and Marian 
Kruger as the little sweetheart, with 
pigtails " 'n'everything" sang in their 
own well-known way, two popular 
songs, "Yours and Mine," and "Down 
by the Old Mill Stream." These two 
girls went over big, and it was said 
of them that if kids can sing and 
act so well we do not need them any 
bigger or older. 

"Pins and Needles," as interpreted 
by Margaret Lehn, was a very de- 
lightful reading. Peg is a newcomer 
to Delphian this year, and she cer- 
tainly has proved herself to be a 
valuable asset by her ability to give 
readings, particularly humorous ones. 

"Twists and Turns," an acrobatic 
dance by Helen Franklin, was receiv- 
2d with very much enthusiasm. There 
is no one on our compus quite like 
Helen when it comes to doing tap, 
toe, or acrobatic dances. She certain- 
ly has talent, and gave an excellent 
demonstration of her versality. 

The well-known "L.V. Crooners," 
Lenn a Allen and Jerry White, thrill- 
ed all with their lovely harmonizing 
in "Say a little Prayer for me" and 
"Heartaches." These two certainly 
would make a wonderful vaudeville 
team, but we are glad that they are 
here on our campus to give us real 
entertainment. Jerry was Kalo's only 
representative on the program, but he 
made up in quality for what was lack- 
ing in quantity. 

Ruth Shroyer as critic commended 
all who participated in this very de- 
lightful program. 

All then adjourned to Kalo Hall, 
where delicious refreshments were 
served by Delphian Freshmen. The 
Kalo's proved to be excellent hosts 
in their newly renovated hall. Card 
tables were provided, and the radio 
furnished adequate music for those 
who wished to dance. It proved to 
be a very enjoyable evening for all. 
) . ♦ . — 

KAPPA LAMBDA NU 

PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



The Philo-Clio Joint Session on 
Friday, April 17th, proved a grand- 
iose affair. "In the blazon of sweet 



beauty's best," the Clionians present- 
ed a most entertaining fashion Know, 
while the Philokosmians interspersed 
the intermissions with novelty num- 
bers. Fun and jollity ran h\y;h, and 
the sociability of the event was unu- 
sually fine. 

Much of the credit for the organ 
ization and production of the per- 
formance belongs to the two master.-: 
of ceremony, Miriam Book and Ed- 
ward Shellenberger. Not a minute 
was allowed to be dry dua to their 
ready with and pithy remarks. 

The program was opened by a word 
of welcome by the preisdent ot' Philo, 
Francis Barr. Then the masters of 
ceremony, by the use of a mock ar- 
gument, introduced the combined 
Philo-Clio orchestra under the direc- 
tion of Fred W. Mund. The orchestra 
played three numbers, two marches, 
"The Scoutmaster," and "The Cham- 
pion," and also a minuet entitled, 
"The Three Graces." The members 
of the orchestra were Chdstine Gru- 
ber, Clinton Allen, Carl Feyers, Don- 
ald Shope, Harry Zeck, John Zeck, 
Helen Eddy, Virginia Thrush, Joseph 
Rhen and Fred W. Mund, directing. 

The scene opens in the home of 
Joseph Rhen and Margaret Longen- 
ecker who are entertaining Paul Em- 
enheiser and Gertrude Paul. The last 
named announce their engagement, 
and then decide to take in the fashion 
show at the beauty shop of Madame 
Fontaine. 

The first feature was a display of 
sport costumes. The models were 
Margaret Krider, Chariot Weirick, 
Hadie Blubaugh, Christine Gruber, 
Margaret Kohler and Mildred Nye. 
After the display tlnis entire group of 
models gave a sport dance. 

The second feature was a display of 
afternoon growns and tea dresses by 
the same girls. After this exnibition 
there was a violin duet entitled, "O 
Sol Mio," given by Christin? Gruber 
and Chariot Weirick. 

The third feature was a showing of 
evening gowns, and cne of ths 
models, namely, Martha KivJcr, very 
sweetly sang "My Alice Blu J Gown." 

The last feature was a uL;play of 
pajamas in the beauty shop. The 
group then ended the show with a 
pajama dance. These dances were 
arranged by Fartha Krider, Miriam 
Book wrote the skit in its entirety. 
Edward Shellenberger was very cle- 
ver in the arrangeemnt of novelties 
and stage setting. 

The interludes were well timed and 
precluded any token of monotony. 
The first was a piano solo by Joseph 
Rhen. Next, by way of novelty, 
John D. Hughes gave a barn dance, 
accompanied by Paul K. Kesne on the 
mouth organ and Fred W. Mund on 
the Jew's harp. Another number was 
a quartet by Elizabeth Flook, Mildred 
Nye, Paul Keene, and John Ranck. 
John Ranck also sang a solo number. 
The last novelty, and one which pro- 
voked much mirth, was a group of 
request numbers on the accordian by 
Fred W. Fund. 

After the fashion show, a social 
time was held in which some danced, 
some played cards, and some social- 
ized in their own peculiar way. 
Punch and cakes were at hand, and 
a good time was had by all. 




Baseball season is in full swing 
now in all of the leading colleges. 
L.V.C. opened their season Wednes- 
day against Juniata at Huntington. 
We have 12 games on the schedule 
this year — 8 will be played on for- 
eign fields. 

Coach Charlie McGeehan of Villa- 
nova opened his 20th season as coach 
of baseball at the Main Liner's hang 



out. He is a grey haired old gent 
but still has the pep it takes to put 
a winning team on the field. He has 
been teaching in the Engineering 
school at Villanova for 19 years and 
is well liked by all his associates. We 
offer our best wishes to one of the 
ablest coaches in the diamond racket. 

Villanova opened its season this 
year by dropping a 10-3 decision to 
Georgetown. Kabolis, their star- 
pitcher and hefty lineman (how well 
we remember his play in football) 
was cleared from the mound in the 
7th frame before a barrage of extra 
base hits. 

Gettysburg journeyed to Bucknell 
last Friday and herded the Bisons by 
a decision margin. The final score 
was 13-5. The Bullets had collected 
4 circut clouts, 2 from the bat of 
Endres, a N. J. lad. 

Gettysburg met defeat however the 
next day when they played Penn 
State in a score of 10-6. Gettysburg 
started several nice rallies during the 
closing frames but was unable to 
over-haul the early lead gained by 
the heavy hitting of the Staters. 

Lafayette pulled another one of 
their sensational last minute stunts 
in the form of a four run rally in 
the 9th frame that beat Swarthmore 
13-12. The game was a slugfest with 
the Lafayette boys holding a slight 
edge. 

Penn A. C. took Temple University 
on for a little batting practice and 
turned in a 19-3 deciison. The Owls 
have a fast, smooth outfit but they 
couldn't get going. We tangle with 
Temple May 11th. 

Dickinson, cur opponent for May 
16th, won a clean cut victory over 
Westminster 12-6 Saturday. They 
have a good many regulars from last 
year and the addition of a new catch- 
er greatly helped their defense. 

P. M. C. won a pitcher's duel from 
Ostropathy by a 5-3 count. We tangle 
with the cadets May 20th and a good 
battle is expected. 

F. and M.'s devoting their time to 
track instead of baseball this year 
with favorable results — they trimmed 
Villanova in a dual meet 74-51. 

Army suffered a 19-1 defeat from 
the N. Y. Yankees in an exhibition 
game on Friday but came back and 
beat Haverford 21-1 the following. 
Where is that fellow that said col- 
lege baseball is as good as profes- 
sional ? 

Susquenhaan dropped Elizabeth- 
town by the tune of 7-4 Saturday. 
The Selingsgrove lads have a fast 
fielding nine and many rumors have 
been circulating that they have a 
couple of twirlers that can cause 
plenty of trouble. 

Don't forget the tennis match Fri- 
day afternoon with Elizabethtown. 
We lost to F. and M. last Saturday 
but the team is practicing hard and 
expects a different outcome Friday. 
Donmoyer will be out of the line up 
due to injuries but a good team will 
be on hand for the match. 

Our first home game in baseball 
will be May Day — All out and see 
our fellows spring dance about the 
diamond. Best of luck in all the 
games — We need it! 




Robin Hood has come again, this 
time not "shooting the dunne deer 
in Sherwood Forest greene," but in 
the person of a Turkish outlaw, De- 
mirdji Effe by name. He was the 
leader of mountain bandits who for 
years have kidnapped and robbed the 
rich and have distributed their spoils 
to the needy. However, the robber 
has now been caught by a modern 
Sheriff of Nottingham, the Turkish 
government, and will be tried in the 
Smyrna Criminal Court. 



That the present depression is seri- 
ous is shown in the reecnt arrest f 
Nicholas Delli, a mendicant of New 
York. When previously arrested, a 
year ago, he carried $2800 as Mf 
"earnings" for a week. This year hi s 
weekly income has dropped to $171 
Even on this paltry return, he i s 
able- to maintain a couple of apart- 
ments. Signor Delli augments his 
crutch with the very ingenious device 
of wearing his right shoe on his left 
foot and his left, shoe on his right 
foot. 



About three hundred and fifty 
years ago, during the reign of Ivan 
the Terrible, a group of Russion Cos- 
sacks traveled to a remote section of 
northern Siberia, and there establish- 
ed a settlement entirely separated 
from outside civilization. This colony 
has lived in almost total ignorance of 
world events and, until discovered re- 
cently by a group of Soviet Russian 
scientists, believed that Russia was 
still ruled by a czar. The inhabitants 
speak an ancient dialect and use cus- 
toms dead for hundreds of years. 
Thev do not marry outside the tribe 
and, as the report tersely states, "li- 
quor was unknown to them." 



Deans of men in American col- 
leges and universities discussed a 
very important matter at their an- 
nual conference at Gatlinsburg, Ten- 
nessee. The discussion was on the 
subject of regulation for student- 
owned airplanes. It seems that 
planes are becoming very common 
possessions of undergraduates, and 
the worthy deans are perturbed about 
the situation. Perhaps the day will 
come when every college will boast 
a collegiate airport. 



Kosaku Yamada, a Japanese musi- 
steian, will introduce an opera of his 
native land to the Parisian opera-go- 
ers in late May or early June. This 
opera is written in true Oriental 
form, and uses a thirty-two note, 
quarter-tone scale instead of our fa- 
miliar half tone gamut. The con- 
ductor will employ a European or- 
chestra and will add three Japanese 
percussion instruments and a short, 
very shrill flute which can dominate 
a whole orchestra. Mr. Yamada 
thinks that this new scale will start 
an entirely new school of music. 



The city of Paris reecntly had a 
very queer experience. A heavy black 
cloud, which had hovered overhead 
for some time, suddenly burst and 
deluged the city with bright red mud. 
Pedestrians, vehicles, and buildings 
were all splashed, and for a while 
Paris looked as though a troop of 
hoodlums had been playing practical 
jokes with cans of crimson paint. In 
some places half an inch of red mud 
was left in the streets. This cloud 
of mud had come from the Sahara 
desert, 1800 miles away. Whirled in- 
to the air in Africa, it was blown 
across the Mediterranean Sea and 
north into France, where it burst over 
Paris. 



Here is an item which will cause 
some husbands to experience dreadful 
memories and might possibly occa- 
sion qualms and doubts in prospective 
grooms. We are assured that three- 
quarters of a billion dollars are spent 
annually in this country for the serv- 
ices of beauty shops and the purchase 
of materials for beautification. This 
is an average of about twelve dollars 
for every female inhabitant in tne 
United States, whatever that rn ay 
prove. 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 1931. 



PAGE THREE 




What did you say, Ruth? This col- 
umn is due again. Oh, it's late. I'm 
holding the paper up. No, I'm darn- 
e( j if I am. I may be making the 
publication of it late, but I am not 
upholding it, especially this column, 
j know it's rotten. You don't have 
to tell me. How about helping me 
out. W vou nave an y good jokes, 
gen d them in. t?ov every published 
joke we will give to the contributor 
absolutely free one life-sized, auto- 
graphed picture of Adam and Eve. 
go send in your jokes and get one of 
these pictures without any cost to 
voU . And don't suggest that I pub- 
lish my picture; I've heard that one 
before. Address all letters to P.O. P., 
care of this paper. 



Numerous letters from various 
readers of this column have been 
flooding my office (?????) lately, in- 
quiring as to what is the meaning of 
the title of this column. In answer 
to these many requests I am announc- 
ing below the meaning of the title, 
"The Boomerang." 

Boomerang: a curved club used by 
the natives of Australia; any story or 
project, especially a scandalous one, 
which reacts against its originator; 
the title of a column published in "La 
Vie Collegiene" which is popularly re- 
garded as the humor column, but 
which is a decided ache in the head to 
its author. 



Late Joke Flashes (very late in 
fact; if you doubt my word, see that 
charming Miss who edits this paper) : 
Women can neither be understood nor 
misunderstood— Those who try to un- 
derstand women generally succeed in 
only marrying them — Women think 
they are moral when they are only 
behind the times — To thy own self 
be true and thou mayest be false to 
any woman — If I have to get in trou- 
ble, I'd rather have a black cat cross 
my path than a Mack truck — At a 
houseparty an old-fashioned dancer is 
one who dances — And simply because 
a man with a Roman nose gets lit up 
is no sign that his nose is a Roman 
candle— Do you think' that Trader 
Horn calls his mother Mater Horn — 
At least, unemployed apples should 
have no worms working in them — The 
^ay students study today makes it 
Possible for them to attend college 
a nd still have twenty-four hours left 
amusements — Chicago should car- 
ry all her yeggs in one basket — I call 
m y bathtub Diamond, because it's a 
setting for the ling — Rudy Vallee is 
w men's crooning glory — And that's 
enough. 



He: What are you going to do with 
y °ur bathing suit this winter? 
She: Use it for a book mark. 



Editor of this column. There's 
^lething I've always wanted and 
ave never been able to get. 
Editor of this paper: That's easy. 



hi Sweden it's different. Over there 
6c ken is an old god instead of just 
* ^ial obligation. 



Matinee 



ty. <= c Performance: "Women 

. lth out Men"— an all-talking produc- 



f George Washington— the god of the 

, redi t Men! He left a farewell ad- 
Qr ess. 

On 

ne = How can I make anti-freeze? 
; w °'- Hide her wool pajamas. 

e: Goe! He certainly has hair on 
! ' «hest. 
* e: Who? 
* he: Rin-Tin-Tin. 



COLLEGE BOY 



Hello everybody ! This is your new 
friend, College Boy, talking. I'm 
breaking into print this week. Was 
suposed to appear last week, but the 
printer lost me, or the editor didn't 
like me, or I was too busy to write, 
or something. Anyhow, I wasn't 
there, but am appearing with a bang 
in this issue. I don't know what kind 
of a bang, but possibly it's a "bang 
out." 

Spring is here and the end of the 
term is fast approaching, and that 
means examinations. Already stu- 
dents are wandering around in a 
daze with that "exam look" on their 
faces. In order to relieve this ten- 
sion, I have prepared a list of methods 
for passing examinations. 

Number One: Enter the classroom 
briskly with that know-it-all look, 
leisurely take a seat, nonchalantly 
grab one last look in your book, shut 
it with a loud, determined bang and 
meet the "prof's" eye with a straight- 
forward gaze. When he has finished 
writing the first question on the 
board, scribble furiously on your 
paper as though writing the answer. 
Keep this up until the fellow next to 
you quits writing. Then put your 
hand on your forehead as if reading 
your answer, while you are in reality 
reading the answer of the guy next 
to you. Put down your answer after 
the "prof" writes the next question 
on the board. Repeat this process as 
necessary. Just as you leave the 
room remark in a loud voice so that 
the "prof" can hear you, "Easy, eh?" 
This method seldom fails. 

Number Two: Don't take the exam- 
ination. Repeat the same course next 
year. 

Number Three: If the other me- 
thods fail, try studying. 

Hope my ideas have been a big 
help to you. So long till next week. 
In the meantime look for me in the 
soup. — College Boy. 



Y. W.-Y. M. NOTES 



The Y.W.C.A. Friendly Hour serv- 
ice on Sunday evening centered upon 
the idea of spring and the lessons 
nature teaches us of God in this sea- 
son of the year. 

The program was opened by a cello 
solo, "A Song to the Evening Star" 
from Tannahauser, played by Virginia 
Thrush, accompanied by Dorothy Ely 
at the piano. Ethel Hower gave a 
very interesting talk, in which she 
explained the manner in which we re- 
ceived our Bible, — how it has grown 
and developed all through the his- 
tory of the Hebrew people whose con- 
tribution it is to civilization. Lenora 
Bender read as the Scripture lesson 
Psalm eight. Sara Ensminger gave 
a talk in which she pointed out a num- 
ber of the very helpful lessons that 
nature will teach those who are 
heedful to her message. The con- 
cluding numbers of the program were 
"Spring in Heaven" by Louise Dris- 
coll and Manfield's "West Wind," read 
by Betty LeFevre and Miriam Owen 
respectively. 



The Y.M.C.A. discussion groups 
proved very interesting on Sunday 
evening. Robert Roudabush gave a 
short talk on "Does Science Help or 
Handicap Religion?" After his dis- 
cussion, he conducted a discussion in 
which every one took part. Due to 
the unusual interest shown the meet- 
ing had to be closed before all ques- 
tions had been handled. 

Paul Emenheiser conducted devo- 
tions, using the 91st Psalm and offer- 
ing prayer. The special number on 
the program was a mandolin solo by 
Fred W. Mund, who played the sextet 



from "Luci di Lammermoor." 

Next week the speaker will be 
Robert Rawhouser. His topic will 
be " Should College Men go to 
Church ?" This meeting will follow 
on the heels of the "Y" Conference, 
and should prove very stimulating. 
At each of the two meetings held thus 
far, the "Y" room has been crowded, 
and should this situation become more 
acute, a larger room will have to be 
sought. 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



Boy, Oh boy, Oh boy! talk about 
busy! I have the lousy one-armed 
paperhanger cheated by a wide mar- 
gin! Junior Prom, baseball, studies 
(Profs, please not) and not to men- 
tion "May pole" practice. 

Yes! I have fallen! At first I swore 
to masculine determination. I wou'd 
not participate! But if any cf y.u 
people have taken as much "Bronr.- 
cheering" as I have done, you wouM 
do anything to avoid further criti- 
cism. The fellows said I was a 

So and so, the girls wouldn't waste 
words. The few that did lowor their 
dignity didn't waste any words either, 
they told me PLENTY! As yet, I 
have not practiced but the next ses- 
sion will see a new face among the 
delegates. I may not be there in 
spirit but will sure be there in the 
flesh. ! |I 

Tomorrow the lid on baseball is 
pried off for the Varsity squad. The 
Juniata Indians will be ambushed on 
their own stamping grounds. If we 
can "count coup" on these braves 
stock will go up in the minds of stu- 
dents who are still discussing last 
year's season with much gusto! 
Here's hoping that L. V. team proves 
bad medicine for the redskins. 
(Squaws will be considered non-com- 
batants during the contest but after- 
wards Let the weak and maimed 

mount the high benches.) 

I have the cutest little pal in my 
room! He really is clever and so 
amusing! Each night he crawls up 
on my pillow and sings lullabys to 
me, then tops off the concert with a 
playful little nip and pinch on the 
contiguous anatomy. If I happen to 
be in a philosophical mood and desire 
no concert he does his best to amuse 
me. with gymnastic feats that would 
make the most apt circus performer 
jealous with envy. At the comple- 
tion of each performance he coyly 
looks at me to see if his efforts have 
met with approval. If not, he gently 
crawls back in his nest behind the 
laboratory and broods. I call him 
"Minnie" and he is the nicest little 
cockroaches. George Nye being of 
tieth has also become attached to one 
of the same species. Jim calls his 
Elmer and fondly cares for him as 
one should do to all well behaving 
cockroaches. eGorge Nye being of 
a more brutal nature has petitioned 



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the faculty for some preparation to 
rid the Dormitory of our pets. Alas, 
some people can not see the beauties 
of nature. Will tell you more about 
"Minnie" later. 

George (Art Shires) Wikoff is 
gradually rounding into a poetical 
career. His recent and initial master- 
piece was rejected. That is the way 
all we young Muses start out George, 
so don't feel dis-illusioned. Miss Wal- 
lace shouldn't read so much anyway. 

The only adverse criticism I can 
make on the Junior Prom, is the fact 
that this guy Opie Cates is renowned 
for his similarity to Buddy Rogers 
and Buddy Rogers brings sighs, 
goose-flesh and high blood pressure 
to all females. Ed Shellenberger 
told me I resembled one Movie star 
so I am going with plenty of confi- 
dence and well known ability. The 
only thing is I can't figure out who 
this guy Rin-Tin-Tin is? Must be 
a plumber and maybe he will forget 
his tools! 

MAKE UP A PARTY OF 
FRIENDS AND ATTEND THE 
JUNIOR PROM. GET YOUR 
TICKETS EARLY ! 

There is a certain girl on the cam- 
pus who says she is blue and unhappy 
over the fact that her boy friend did 
a "Paavo Nurmi" on her. She says 
she desires some verse to sooth her 
turbulent mind. I am laboring hard 
and if she has no objetcions I am 
going to print it at a future date. 
Anything to please anyone! I have 
no conscience! 

Think I will make a parlimentary 
motion to close for the week and as 
Murphy Kazulsky would say, "The 
Eyes" have it! 




At a reecnt meeting of the Penn- 
sylvania Academy of Science held in 
Harrisburg, Dr. W. Earl Light, As- 
sociate professor of Biology presente I 
a paper on "Cultured Sphaerella " 
The meeting was also attended by 
Professors Derickson and Grimm an 1 
Messrs. Meiser, Hemperly, Bixler and 
Derickson. The evening meeting and 
banquet of the Academy was held at 
the Indian Echo Cave at Hummels- 
town after which the scientists view- 
ed the interesting geological features 
of the cave. 



Prof. H. H. Shenk who is head of 
the History Department is editing an 
Encyclopedia of Pennsylvania His- 
tory, which will be out some time 
during the summer. 



The Shenks entertained the follow- 
ing members of the Faculty at a din- 
ner, Friday, April 17, 1931: Dr. and 
Mrs. Bender, Miss Lietzau, Fiss G 11- 
espie, Prof. Stokes and Prof. Behney. 



Miss Lucile Shenk '23 who is as- 
sisting her father in the History Da- 
partment, is writing a history of 
Blair County for the National His- 
torical Association at Harrisburg. 



Prof. Stokes, Madam Greene, and 
Miss Lietzau spent a very delightful 
day in Philadelphia, Saturday, April 
18, 1931. 



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> 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 2:5, 1931. 



Among Our Seniors 





CAROLINE FISHER 

What a versatile girl! Carly can do 
anything she is asked to do and do 
it well. You need no further proof 
than to glance at her honors during 
her four year's stay at L.V.C. She 
is president of the W.S.G.A., a posi- 
tion which requires much stamina 
and "stick-to-it-iveness." Ask her! 
She was anniversary president of 
Delphian Literary Society, vice-presi- 
dent the first term, and always a re- 
liable source to which to go for novel 
ideas. 

Carly is an excellent student and is 
an assistant in her major, English, 
Dramatically, she has made her mark 
upon the campus, starring in many 



OPIE CATES AT 

JUNIOR PROM 

(Continued from Page 1) 



lege graduates from that institution 
A representative of the school wen' 
to Carlisle last Saturday night tc 
judge the music. He also talked witl. 
members of the InJua-frate Mitj 
council and they were highly pleaset 
with the conduct and quality of thi 
group. The night previous Opi 
Cates played for the Rochester Jun- 
ior Prom, where he received a tre-' 
mendous ovation. 

His style of playing is very simila 
to that of Guy Lombardo, soft, mutec 
solos with the director croonin; 
choruses in his sweet tenor voice! All 
lovers of Guy Lombardo and his style 
should not fail to attend the Prom, 
at Hershey Ball Room, May 8th. 

Cates just reecntly finished a three 
months' contract at Sebastian's Cot- 
ton Club, the "Mecca" of all movie 
folks. His nightly programs were 
broadcast over radio Station K.F.L. 



L. V. C. DEFEATED 

IN TENNIS 



(Continued from Page 1) 



ponent in straight sets. Leatham play- 
ing last man was defeated. 

F. and M. made a clean sweep of 
the doubles. Donmoyer injured his 
hand in his single match and was un- 
able to play his average game in the 
doubles. Hutchinson and Donmoyer 
were defeated by Hazeltine and Von 
Seldenic 6-2, 6-2. Miller and Rank 
and Bower and Litham lost their 
double matches thus giving F. and M. 
a 6-3 decision. 

The tennis team meets Eliza- 
bethtown here Friday afternoon at 
2:30. Donmoyer will be unable to 
play but a strong team will be on 



productions. The last but not least, 
being the lovely Melicande in Milne's 
"The Romantic Age." Carly is also 
interested in sports, and practiced 
faithfully with the varsity basketball 
garls. 

It would be too numerous to men- 
tion all of Caroline's accomplishments 
— they are infinite. We expect much 
from Carly after graduation in her 
chosen field, whatever it may be. 



KEMETH RUSSELL 

Among our Seniors! The boy from 
Erie — if you ask him. Intends to be 
a chemist ar.d plans to attend N.Y.U. 
next year. Used to sing in the Glee 



Club, Was associate editor of the 
1931 Quittapahilla. And of course, is 
the President of the Men's Senate. 

He smokes 0. P. C.'s . . . shaves 
twice a week . . . Uses Mennem Tal- 
cum .... Rooms with George Becker 
and William Spangler .... Prefers 
the athletic type . . . Started out as 
a football man . . . Plays the trumpet 
and is an authority on the Queen of 
Englanl ... A loyal member of Kalo 
and the Chemistry Club. 

Well Sonny, here's back to you and 
your endeavors. May the four years 
spent among us remain forever in 
your memory — as a treasure. So 
long fellow, and success to you ! 



hand to face the Lancaster county 
'ads. The support of all students is 
iesired at the match. 



A-l SKTL* 
WOMS WONDERS 




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SENIORS 

Now is a good time to order 
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Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
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DEAN'S BIRTHDAY 

CELEBRATED 



(Continued from Page 1) 



dance. The program concluded with 
Helen Franklin's displaying her grace 
and skill in tap dancing. For about 
half an hour, the girls sang various 
college songs and favorites of old 
songs as well as popular ones. 

Delicious refreshments were served, 
buffet style, while chocolate was 
poured by Sara Ensminger and Ethel 
Mae Hower. 

The girls departed after having ex- 
tended their congratulations to Mrs. 
Green and wishing her many more 
happy birthdays. 



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HERE'S TO THE 



QUEEN OF THE MAY! 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



HERE'S TO THE BEST 
MAY DAY EVER! 



VOLUME VIII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 1931. 



NO. 7 



L, V. C. LOSES 
TO URSINOS 



FIRST BASEBALL GAME 
GOES TO ELEVEN 
INNINGS 



The Lebanon Valley College base- 
ball team opened their season Tues- 
day against Ursinus at Collegeville, 
losing an 8-7 decision in 11 innings. 
The Blue and White tied the score 
twice and forged ahead in the final in- 
ning but luck was against them and 
they lost the well played ball game. 

Shortledge, the first L.V.C. man to 
bat this season, started the season off 
with a clean single. Wycoff sacrifi- 
ced him to second. Stewart went 
out third to first and Light scored 
him with a clean single. Daub went 
out pitcher to first to end the time 
at bat. 

Ursinus was not to be outdone. 
Reeder walked Leiper, then struck out 
Cable. Lodge singled to center, Lei- 
per taking third then Sterner came 
through with a home run over the 
bleachers, making the score 3-1 at 
the end of the first inning. 

Lebanon Valley came back in the 
second to knot the count at three all 
when Patrizio doubled and Reeder 
playing his first game for L. V. C, 
put one of Paris's fast ones over the 
centerfield bleachers. 

There was no further scoring until 
the sixth when Light's error permit- 
ted Sterner to score after having 
been walked and sacrificed to second. 

The lucky seventh didn't fail our 
pill swatters and they scored two 
runs after two were out. Patrizio 
struck out to start the inning. Reeder 
flied out to first base. Murphy singled 
and Shortledge followed with his sec- 
ond hit of the game, advancing Mur- 
Phy to third; then Wycoff, another 
newcomer playing second, crashed out 
a clean double to score both runners. 

Ursinus remained scoreless in the 
7th and it looked as if L.V.C. would 
win the ball game but in the 8th 
Shell, a substitute third baseman, 
hashed out a triple and scored on 
Coble's infield tap. 

Both teams remained scoreless dur- 
the 9th and 10th, but in the 11th 
Patrizio, the first man up, smashed 
ou t a clean single. Reeder followed 
w ^th another, then Murphy struck 
(Continued on Page 4) 



SEVENTEEN COLLEGES 

REPRESENTED AT "Y" 



( The grand total of delegates at the 
conference was eighty-five, and 
^ ev enteen colleges were represented 



Th 



re e Y. M. C. A. secretaries were 
pre sent, and- thirteen faculty advis- 
° rs put in their appearance at one 
me or another. The colleges were 
Resented as follows: Albright, 
l > Bloomsburg, four; Dickinson, 
, °! Dickinson Seminary, five; Eliza- 
etht 0wn> five . Franklin and Mar- 
all » three; Gettysburg, two; Juni- 
eight; Kutztown, five; Lebanon 
le y» twelve; Lock Haven, six; 
^riafield, four; Mercersburg, one; 



.ersville, seven; Shippensburg, 
Sfy a j. ' Susquehanna, five; Penn. 



e » two. 



RUSSIA DISCUSSED 

AT HISTORY CLUB 



In a short but lively meeting, the 
History Club met Wednesday even- 
ing April 29th. The discussion on 
"Should United States recognize Sov- 
iet Russia?" proved to be highly in- 
teresting and worthwhile. This ques- 
tion is a pertinent one and is arous- 
ing much comment in political circles 
to-day. Martha Daley upheld the 
viewpoint that our country should 
grant recognition to the communistic 
country. Ruth Shroyer defended the 
present attitude of the United States 
toward Russia. After the two speak- 
ers had exhausted their material, the 
meeting was thrown open for general 
criticism. 



FROSH GIRLS GUESTS 

OF MISS JOHNSON 



A group of Freshman girls were 
entertained last Wednesday evening, 
April 22nd, by Miss Stella Johnson, 
at her home on E. Main Street. The 
evening was enjoyably spent playing 
bridge. The honors of the evening 
went to Miss Charlotte Weirich, who 
received first prize, and to Miss Mil- 
dred Nye, who was awarded the sec- 
ond prize. After cards, refreshments 
were enjoyed. 

Among those present were the 
Misses Martha Kreider, Helen Lane, 
Haidie Blubaugh, Ruth Anna Mark, 
Winifred Miller. Verna Grissinger. 
Kathryn Mowery. Mary Gossard, 
Dorothy Jackson, Mildred Nye, Char- 
lotte, Weirick and the hostess, Miss 
Stella Johnson. 



"Y" CONFERENCE 
BIG SUCCESS 



SPEECHES NOTEWORTHY 
MEETINGS WELL 
ATTENDED 



GLEE CLUB TRAVELS 

TO JOHNSTOWN 



The Lebanon Valley Glee Club 
gave a concert in Johnstown on 
Thursday, April 23, under the direc- 
tion of Professor Crawford. 

The club left Annville on Thursday 
and motored to Johnstown arriving 
about four o'clock that evening. The 
concert was held in the First United 
Brethren Church of Johnstown with 
Rev. Gohn, an alumnus of Lebanon 
Valley College, the pastor. The con- 
cert was one of the best and most 
successful that the boys have had this 
season. 

After the program was over the 
boys were royally entertained at the 
homes of newly acquired friends. 
They wish to thank these people for 
the hospitality that was shown them. 

The next day the club motored to 
Clearfield where they gave a similar 
program in the Junior High School 
of that place. 

Late Saturday night the weary 
troupers arrived in Annville. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Friday, May 1—8:00 P.M. Sixty- 
fifth Anniversary of Philokosmian 
Literary Society. 

Saturday, May 2—9:30 A.M., Ten- 
nis Match, L.V. vs. Dickinson (home). 
—1:30 P.M., May Day Fete. 
— Baseball, L.V. vs. Juniata (home). 
—8:00 P. M., Glee Club Concert 
(home). 

(Sunday, May 3—5:30 P.M.,' Y. W. 
C. A. Friendly Hour. 
— 5:45 P. M., Y. M. C. A. Discussion. 

Wednesday, May 6 — Tennis, L. V. 
vs. Elizabethtown (away). 



Credit is indeed due our college for 
the noteworthy success of the Y.M. 
C.A. Conference which was held here 
from April 23rd to April 26th. First. 
Dr. Gossard and the administration 
are to be congratulated for their 
wholehearted support. Then, Dr. 
Jones, our pastor, is to be thanked 
for his untiring cooperation. The 
Mite Society of the U.B. Church, and 
the folks of the town certainly work- 
ed as though they were "entertaining 
angels unawares." The local Y. M. 
C. A. did all it could to make the 
short stay of the delegates pleasant 
and profitable. Others, too numerous 
to mention, in the opening of their 
homes and in the doing of many lit- 
tle kindnesses, aided in making suc- 
cessful one of the best influences that 
ever came to our campus. 

Although it is impossible to report 
in detail all the events of the confer- 
ence, some points of especial interest 
deserve note. On Thursday evening 
about sixty delegates were already 
registered, and the first meeting was 
held in Kalo Hall at eight o'clock. 
It was a matter of inspiration and 
fellowship, in which a note of expec- 
tancy and challenge was sounded. All 
who were present took part after a 
(Continued on Page 3) 



GET READY FOR 
THE JUNIOR PROM 



DEFINITE PLANS MADE; 
MAKE RESERVATIONS 
NOW 



BI-MONTHLY MEETING 

OF GERMAN CLUB 



The regular meeting of the Ger- 
man Club was held on Monday even- 
ing, April 28, at 7:30 P.M. in South 
Hall parlor. The meeting was called 
to order by Ethel Hower. the presi- 
dent. The first number on the pro- 
gram was a paper prepared by Kath- 
lyn Gockley on "Safety." Then Al- 
ma Binner read several poems, fol- 
lowed by a discourse on German poets 
by Ethel Hower. All the members 
present next sang the anniveikary 
song of the club which was introduced 
at the last meeting. After the pro- 
gram the picnic was discussed which 
is to bo "held on May 13. It was de- 
cided that each member of the club 
should furnish part of the refresh- 
ments. Much enthusiasm was shown 
by all those present for the proposed 
uting, and the meeting was finally 
adjourned at 9 o'clock. 



L. V. C. DEFEATS 

E-TOWN NETMEN 



At this date definite plans have 
been carried out to the letter in re- 
gards to the Prom, given May 8th. 
The election and posters have kept 
interest at "white heat" and all stu- 
dents are anxiously awaiting the zero 
hour when Opie Gates strikes up his 
marvelous band and all couples fall 
in line. 

A delegation of five students attend- 
ed the Ball given last Saturday night 
in Harrisburg to hear Mr. Cates and 
his orchestra. The reports are so 
complimentary that for me to tell 
you would seem like exaggeration 
but if any one is skeptical, just ask 
Jimmy Frevola. He will tell you his 
candid opinion. 

All press praise has not been over- 
done. This orchestra will please 
everyone. Their variety is great and 
all styles of dance tunes are played 
willingly. 

The writer spent a pTeasant half- 
hour talking to the orchestra and we 
have their word that anything and 
everything will be done within their 
power to make the party a success. 

I have been stating that from press 
reports Mr. Cates is a born "double" 
for Buddy Rogers. This is certainly 
true, and the only way you can call 
me a prevaricator is to attend and see 
for yourself. 



EURYDIGE GIVES 
HOME CONCERT 

EXCELLENT PROGRAM 
PRESENTED BY 
SONGSTERS 



The L. V. C. tennis team staged a 
wonderful comeback last Friday and 
defeated the Elizabethtown College 
team 6-0 in a thrilling but one sided 
match. 

Quite a bit of talk circulating about 
the loss of Donmoyer threw a scare 
into the outfit but it had no ill re- 
sults. The team played an uphill 
battle in several of the matches and 
finally came out on top. 

Hutchinson playing first man was 
in nice form and easily defeated 
Crouthamel, the Elizabethtown first 
rater in straight sets. The first set 
ended 6-1 with Hutchinson winning 
two lone games. TTie second set 
looked bad when the visitors took the 
first two games but Joe came back 
and won the next six to sew up the 
match. 

Rank playing second man didn't 
have it quite so soft. He won the 
first set 6-4 lost the next 2-6 and 
came from behind to take the final 
and decisive set 6-4. His opponet was 
Kaylor. 

Bowers with his powerful left 
crashed through with straight set 
victories over Deiter. The first set 
ended 8-6 and the second 6-4. This 
was one of the most exciting matches 
on the card. 

Miller also won his match with 
straight set victories — playing an up- 
hill battle from the first. He vanquish- 
ed Lauer 7-5 and 6-2. 

The doubles were not so easy — 
both L.V.C. teams lost the first set 
and staged beautiful comebacks. 
Hutchinson and Bowers lost the first 
set to Deiter and Crouthamel 3-6 but 
came back to win the next two 6-3 
and 6-4. 

Rank and Miller lost the first set to 
Lauer and Kaylor 6-8 but easily won 
the next set 6-3. The final set was 
a thriller — first one team and then 
the other would take the lead and the 
L. V. C. team finally crashed through 
with a 8-6 decision, thus making a 
clean sweep of the match. 

The team plays St. Joseph's of 
Meadowbrook Wednesday at 3 o'clock 
and tackles Dickinson College on May 
Day. These matches promise to be 
well worth your while. Come out and 
support L. V. C.'s winning tennis 
team. Donmoyer will be in shape for 
the next match. Let's give the whole 
outfit our whole hearted support. We 



The Eurydice Choral Club of Le- 
banon Valley College, under the dir- 
ection of Professor Alexander Craw- 
ford, presented its home concert on 
Tuesday evening at 8:15 P.M. in the 
Engle Conservatory. 

The program was as follows: 
The numbers rendered by the entire 
chorus were excellently sung, and 
showed splendid coaching on the part 
of the director as well as numerous 
rehearsals on the part of the mem- 
bers. Dorothy Haldeman, in her pi- 
ano solos, lived up to the fine reputa- 
tion as a pianist which she has made 
for herself on the campus. The skit 
"Silvia's Aunts" seems to have taken 
place on Lebanon Valley's campus. 
The actresses played their respective 
parts very well. The girls who were 
in the skit were Marion Kruger, Mil- 
dred Christianson, Mildred Nye, 
Evangeline Salorio, Elizabeth Flook, 
Hester Thompson, Helen Eddy, Eula- 
lie Morton and Quebe Nye. Margaret 
Young's solos were beautifully ren- 
dered. One of the outstanding fea- 
tures of the program was the cello 
solo by Henrietta Heilman, who dis- 
played unusual ability in her rendi- 
tion. 



Election of Prom. Leader 

Promises to be Interesting 



With three nominess already elect- 
ed and one more to be chosen tomor- 
row the forth coming election ap- 
pears to resemble a caucus in Chi- 
cago ! The three candidates so far 
chosen are : Robert Stewart, Robert 
McCusker and J. Warren Light. The 
sophomores due to a misunderstand- 
ing that is deeply regretted by all of- 
ficials, have graciously consented to 
hold a re-nomination. 

Two members from the W.S.G.A. 
and a like number from the Men's 
Senate have been selected to act as 
a board of control. "Tony" Reeder 
will act as "fifth" man in the ring. 
The final election is to be held in 
chapel the day of the Prom. May 8th. 
Ballots will not be counted until an 
hour late in the day so absolute secre- 
cy as to the winner will be assured. 

The members of the board will be 
asked to please keep the outcome a 
secret and we sincerely trust that this 
pledge will not be broken. 

Get out and support your nominee! 
Your vote may select the winner! 

Wewish to tell all dancers at this 
time that the orchestra that night is 
our guest and applause is greatly ap- 
preciated. If you have a number you 
want played during the dance, don't 
be timid about asking these men to 
play it for you! They appreciate your 
friendship and are more than willing 
to satisfy you. 

Don't forget to get your reserva- 
tions in this next week before Wed- 
nesday as we wish to have an idea 
of how many have planned to attend. 
See James (Frevola or Allen Short- 
ledge for tickets NOW. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 1931. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

V weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 

Valley Coll ege 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 Editor-in-Chief 

Fred Mund, '32 Associate Bditoi 

Hilda D. Buckley, '32 . .Associate EdltOl 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32 

Associate Editor 
Walter Krumbiegel, '33. . 

Managing Editoi 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Elizabeth Ulrich, '32 

Edward Shellenberger, "33 

Edmund Umberger, '34..Gen'l Reporttn 

Dorothy Garber, '32 General Reporter 

George Snowhill, '34 Conservatory 

Percy Clements, '33 Athletics 

Jane Muth, '33 ft* 1 ™"*? 

Arline Heckrote, '33 ..Delphian 

Clarence Earley, '33 . • Kalozeteai. 

Chester Goodman. '33. . . . . . Philokosmian 

Gloria Lavanture , '33. .Alumni Reportei 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Robert Rawhouser, '32, 

Business Managei 

Herman Mariano. '33, 

Ass't Business Manage! 
Paul Kleinfelter, '32, 

Circulation Manage i 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso,- 
ciation of the Mid dle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies ■ y • ■ .10 cents 

Subscription $1-50 per ye ai 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under tne 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



elected officers for the last term. The 
following will head Delphian for the 
remainder of the year: 

President, Effie LeVan; Vice-presi- 
dent, Margaret Young; Recording 
Secretary, Eva Peck; Corresponding 
Secretary, Marie Gelwicks; Chaplain, 
Mary Buffington; Critic, Henrietta 
Wagner; Pianist, Marion Kruger; 
Wardens, Mina Wolfsheil, Winnie 
Miller. 

Caroline Fisher, Anniversary Presi- 
dent, thanked the girls for cooperat- 
ing with her to make our ninth an- 
niversary successful. Effie LeVan 
gave a short inaugural speech and 
after several items of business were 
transacted, the meeting was ad- 
journed. 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



decision to Swarthmore Saturday but 
that is no feather in our cap. We will 
have to play our best to win. 

Our first home game in baseball is 
Saturday, May Day. We haven't lost 
a game played on this particular day 
for many years — Let's all go out and 
give the team some real support — 
there'll be a real baseball atmosphere 
there too. The "Y" is going to sell 
chinks and candy — maybs peanuts 
too. Now I know you'll all be out 
cheering for L.V.C. Don't forget \ ! 




IN GENERAL 



In this little home of ours, the local 
campus, things have reached a state, 
where something radical has to be 
said, and here it is. 

The author reecntly asked a certain 
professor to ask the men on the cam- 
pus to act as gentlemen during the 
recent Y.M.C.A. conference. The re- 
quest was complied with by the fac- 
ulty members but was not taken very 
well by the student body. Some pro- 
fessed that they were always gentle- 
men — so some of them are. Yet the 
same day that the request was made 
two of the visitors were "ducked" 
upon entering the home of the gen- 
tlemen. Still more reecntly, a certain 
well trained club entertained during 
the chapel period, a thing which is 
much needed, and these same gentle- 
men hurled pennies at the actors. 

To razz players during a paid en- 
tertainment is one thing and to razz 
them when the affair is free is an- 
other. Yet both show ingratitude and 
most ungentlemanly conduct. 

On another point. A sentence was 
given last year by the senate to a 
certain young man, to comply with 
which he was to fix a certain pair, of 
steps. The senate was "backed up" 
in this by a higher body. This year 
the same sentence was issued and yet, 
the other night we almost fell over it 

The "Y" on this campus can't help 
heathen or those who do not wish to 
be helped. To call a "Y" man a 
"long-faced christian" shows absolute 
ignorance of the work on the pail oi 
the speaker. If any one thinks that 
the true christian is "long-faced," 
that man, woman or cihld, has never 
known Christ. 

Now to all of us in particular. If 
you are German — be proud of it; 
but don't revel in your stubbornness 
Because you are Spanish does not 
say that you have to wear a "kem" 
in your hair — be silenty proud. Be- 
cause you are taking music and like 
to sing — don't advertise it. Because 
you're a biologist don't go around 
looking at tree buds and carrying 
snakes and mice in your pockets. Be 
proud, but don't be foolish. Think 
first of others. 

—A SENIOR. 



Due to the Y. M. C: A. Conference 
held on the campus last week, the 
Philokosmian Literary society did 
not hold their regular literary meet- 
ing. 

Plans are being completed now for 
the biggest event in Philo for the 
year. The sixty-fourth anniversary 
will be observed on Friday, May 1. 
The following committees are taking 
charge: 

Favor and Invitations: Barr — chair- 
man: Goodman, E. Shellenberger, 
Schell, Ulrich. 

Program ard Play: Wolfe — chair- 
man; Keene, Eshelman, Evancoe. 

Seating: Watkins — chairman; C. 
Myers, Dellinger, Allen. 

Costume: Christman — chairman; 
Taylor. 

Musk: Esh:lm"n — chai man; Lebo. 
Alumni: Rawhc'user. 
Stage: Hughes — chairman; H. Zech, 
Emenheiser, Adam Snavely. 

Decoration: Mund — chairman; 
Kraybill, Koh'er, All Freshmen. 
Refreshment: Stuart Werner — 
h-d-man; Kniscly, Harry Snavely, 
jT r ve, Jordan. 

The plav under tha diretcion of 
Prof. Wallace, is undergoing the flm 
tinir» tru?h?s, and promises to be one 
">f the best ever produced on the 
campus. 



This same legion h\s furnished ma- 
terial for some of the finest stories 
of military life that yiave been writ- 
ten in modern years. The Foreign 
Legion is very picturesque; most of 
ts members are men who, for some 
reason or other, have desired to ab- 
sent themselves from their native 
lands, and have submitted themselves 
to the rigorous discipline of the Le- 
gion for wages of about a cent a day. 

College professors, who delight in 
subjecting hapless students to the tor- 
ments of tests, were reecntly quizzed 
themselves by Prof. Keith Sward, of 
Western Reserve University. Ninety 
professors from two Pacific coast 
universities, were tested in order to 
ascertain the relative mental abilities 
shown by young men and elderly men. 
The professors were arranged in two 
groups, one ranging from twenty-five 
to forty-five years in age, the other 
frcm sixty to eighty. The results in 
the two groups were about the same. 
Professors listed in "Who's Who," 
and members of honorary societies, 
made consistently higher marks than 
the rest. Another interesting result 
was that, although the young men 
w:re speedier, the oldsters had great- 
er vocabularies. This is encouraging 
information in an age which places 
a premium on youth and decries the 

bi ity of the elderly. 



We suspect that there are many 
stories hidden in the French Legion 
that have not been put into books. 

Sir James Jeans, noted British ma- 
thematician and astrophyscist, has 
ai rived in this country in order to 
attend various scientific, meetings at 
which he will be honored, and to con- 
fer with American colleagues about 
the engrossing problems of the uni- 
verse. Sir James likens the universe 
to a soap-bubble, and is of the .opinion 
that cur world has but a mere trillion 
more years to exist. He supports his 
views in two very fine books, "The 
Universe Around Us" and "The Mys- 
terious Universe." These books are 
purported to be "popular" expositions 
of modern astronomy and cosmism, 
but. we warn you that they are by no 
means light reading. 

Speaking of cosmism, we are re- 
minded of the remarks of Cosmo 
Hamilton, prominent British author. 
Friend Cosmo says that the modern 
young man is about fifty per cent be- 
low the modern young woman, that 
the "weaker" sex is in trie ascendant, 
and that this deplorable condition 



marks the beginning of the end. Her e 
is a juicy morsel from his statement: 
"The modern young man is afflicted 
with half-wittedism, a vacuous eg 0( 
undesiie and inability to earn his liv- 
ing, a tender skin and mental freck- 
les." Hamilton ascribes the causes 
to rickets or the World War; perhaps 
some of our fair readers have other 
opinions. 



In Japan there is a fixed belief that 
there are lucky or unlucky properties 
to certain telephone numbers, and a 
regular business of number brokerage 
has arisen. If a telephone subscriber 
wants a lucky number like 8 or 357, or 
if he wishes to get rid of an unlucky 
number such as 42 or 49, he is willing 
to pay from five hundred to three 
thousand dollars to effect the desired 
change. If the Japanese prince, who 
is visiting the United States at this 
time, is on the look-out for examples 
of Western culture, he will find cus- 
toms in this country which reflect 
about the same degree of enlighten- 
ment as does the Japanese number 
racket. 




ISN'T IT 

TIME 
YOU • • • 



TELEPHONED 

tJMother and 'Dad 
P 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



A short business meeting of Del 
phian Literary Society was held on 
Friday, April 24. to install the newly 



L. V. C. open:d their baseball sea- 
son at Collegeville, Pa. Tuesday 
against Ursinus ar.d lost a 11-inning 
decision by a 8-7 score. The breaks 
were against us.. We had the game 
won twice, but the Ursinus lads came 
back with tying and winning rallies. 
Nice work. Reeder, who said a pit- 
cher couldn't hit — that circuit clout 
was a beauty — Here's hoping you 
have many more. 

Temple, cur opponent for May 11th, 
has been taking it on the chin plenty 
from the Quantica Marines lately — 
The "leathernecks" won all three 
games of the series by decisive scores 
of 11-8, 9-2 and 7-3. The Temple lads 
have the twirlers but they aren't in 
it when it comes to hitting the apple. 

Albright, our Reading friends, op- 
ened their season at Carlisle last 
Wednesday. They handed the Dick- 
inson nine a 4-0 shut out. Karlip — 
the young man who ruined our hopes 
in two basketball tilts, turned in a 
couple of nice singles that resulted in 
scores each time. We must watch 
that boy — he's our jinx it seems. 

The tennis team came back after 
their defeat at the hands of pp. and 
M. and defeated Elizabethtown 6-0. 
Donmoyer was out with his injured 
hand but we couldn't have beaten 
them any worse. 

The Navy tennis team jouimeyed to 
Lancaster and handed F. and M. a 
trouncing, 8-1. Guess we won't play 
the Navy just yet — 

We play Dickinson here May Day 
(in the morning). They lost a 9-0 



The botany classes of Grinnell Col- 
ege recently had the opportunity of 
inspecting the "sacred African lily." 
which .apart from its size, is remark- 
able for the noxious odor which it dif- 
fuses. These classes did not study 
it long, for the nauseating aroma 
soon became a terrific carrion stench 
that permeated the whole floor of the 
building. So we see that the order 
of things is changed. For a long 
ime, the science of chemistry has re- 
joiced in hydrogen sulfide, while bi- 
ology has retaliated feebly with the 
carcasses of defunct cats. But now 
biological science has procured a pow- 
erful weapon in the "sacred African 
lily," and H2S totters on its throne. 



The French Foreign Legion is now 
a hundred years old. This great mili- 
tary organization, formed in 1831 of 
men who are not citizens of France, 
is the means by which the French 
government maintains law and order 
in its domains in northern Africa 



TYPEWRITER SPECIAL 

We will sell for CASH three 
Underwood Portable T y p e 
writers, fresh from the factory. 

i 

The regular price of the Un- 
do' wood Standard is $60.00. 
Our Special Price is $40.00 ! 

BOLLMAN'S 

33 South Eighth Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 




IT GIVES SO MUCH 

and 

TAKES SO LITTLE! 

There are few things you can do that will 
give the folks as much pleasure as a tele- 
phone chat with you; and mighty few 
that will give you such a thrill! 

All it takes is a few minutes of your time; 
a very small bit of effort, and a tiny share 
of your pin money. (Charges can be re~ 
versed, for that matter.) 

Go to a telephone tonight, give your 
home telephone number to the Operator 
— and in a jiffy you'll be home again. 

Make a date to telephone home on a certain 
evening every week. 




4 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 1931 



PAGE THREE 




In response to ye columnist's re- 
vest for aid( help, and succor in 
pre paring this joke review, the official 
staff ™ ail has been filled with letters 
from humor fans, who have sent in 
their favorite laughts in order to se- 
cure the beautiful picture which we 
offered in our last issue. The lucky 
ones whose contributions are pub- 
lished below can call at "The Boom- 
erang" office in the near future and 
r eecive their gift absolutely free. 



Y. W.-Y. M. NOTES 



Ans: Have you heard the Tarzan 
song ? 

Rudy: Nope. Shoot it. 
Ann: I'm dancing with Tarzan in 
my eyes. 



Clarence "Babe" Early advises that 
if you haven't enough money for a 
haircut, be nonchalant and wear a 
"Vote Communist" button. 



"Red" Wogan just handed in his 
version of why a chicken crosses the 
road. "Easy," says "Red," "because 
the rooster is over there." 



Husky "Brute" Lehman tells us 
about the young man who called on 
a school teacher and had to stay an 
extra hour for being naughty. 



In the Y. W. C. A. Friendly Hour 
on Sunday evening, Christian Hymns 
and the function they have played in 
the church throughout the ages were 
considered. Marion Kruger led the 
meeting giving short sketches of the 
development of the church in the vari- 
ous periods of its history. Each 
sketch was followed by a hymn repre- 
sentative of its period, which was 
sung by a choir of girls. By the 
terse, yet clear outline given of 
church hstiory and by the hymns 
sung, a newer and fuller understand- 
ing and appreciation of the signifi- 
cance of our great christian hymns 
was given. 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



Central Pennsylvania Training Conference 




Keene: Doctor, vaccinate me some 
place where it wont' show. 

F. D.: Open your mouth. 

Keene: Not there, Doctor. I sing 
in the glee club. 



Policeman (to Evancoe who just 
had an accident with Taylor's car): 
Don't you know that you should al- 
ways give half the road to a woman 
driver ? 

Evancoe: I always do when I find 
out which half of the road she wants. 



John David Hughes of Catawissa 
reports that he likes a girl that is 
beautiful but dumb. Beautiful enough 
to please him and dumb enough to 
like him. 

Becker: Hey, "l?rosh," gimme a 
light! 

"Frosh": What do you think I am? 
A firefly ? 



Condemned Prisoner (entering Sing 
Sing): What kind of current do you 
have here — direct or alternating? 



Werner: How did you even up with 
your chemistry professor? 

Ulrich: Oh, I handed him a hot 
retort. 



Ann: Do you keep all your love 
letters ? 

Dot: Sure thing! Some day I ex- 
pect them to keep me. 

News Item: "United States Govern- 
ment Starts Campaign to Conserve 
Wild Life." We think that's a move- 
West to perpetuate the Co-ed. 



Saturday is the big day and here 
I am "white-pantless," lacking the 
proper color of shoes, and still in a 
daze as to my directions In the May 
Pole Dance! If it wasn't for the ca- 
pable leadership of Earl Frey, and the 
"back-seat" driving of Eva Peck, com- 
bined with ray Partner's pulling and 
twisting, I think my actions and ges- 
tures would resemble inebriation! If 
they would only put out their hands 
or give some other signal when they 
turn corners! 

This May Pole dancing is an art," 
and for my part I hope that I never 
discover it. There is no need for 
worry however, if I don't do any bet- 
ter in the future than in the few re- 
hearsals! "So ye have asked, so shall 
ye receive" (or words to that effect.) 

Due to inclement weathel- my pal, 
"Minnie" has gone into seclusion. All 
humoring and coaxing will not bring 
him out into the cold. He was down- 
hearted the other night because he 
said the only thing he got for his 
early seasonal appearance was chill- 
blains! Jim Monteith has proved 
grossly fickle! He deserted "Elmer" for 
a dog ! Alas, the fickleness of man is 
often brutal. Regardless of what Jim 
has done, I pledge fidelity to "Min- 
nie," nothing can take his place. He 
has attached "hisself" to me! In the 
words of Carl Sandburg — everything 
is about as it always was! 

Hope some one "proof" reads this 
column as the mistakes are numerous. 
The first one and principal one is the 
column itself! I have been bribed, 
conjoled and begged not to write it, 
but I am only doing it for spite work! 
What does the majority say? 

I have neglected working on any 
gossip this week due to the Junior 
Prom. It takes all my spare time and 
I know it is much more interesting. 
I hope that every reader who sees 
this will hear Opie Cates. If he af 
fects co-eds like he does the male ele 
ment who has heard him — Ziegfield 
may glorify them— this boy stupi- 



"Whatl A man?" shouted the old 
maid as she looked under the bed 



Clem: Don't you know that whis- 
key 

shortens a man's life? 
Speg: What's the odds? You see 
twice as much at the same time. 



Beautiful airplanes are certainly a 
Sl ght for soar eyes. 



There is the story of the Scotch 
8ai *gster who died happy because he 
Wa s taken for a ride. 

T ed: Yes, Tom, and the first is yet 
Tom: No, Ted, the worst is yet to 
Co me. But are you? 
Ted: Yes, Horn, and the first is yet 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
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fys'em! I may have to call on a doz- 
en or so big men to act as a body- 
guard that night, so all ye brawney 
hombre's get your biceps and "mus- 
kels" limbered up. 

Here's the dope girls. He is from 
Missouri and you know their motto! 
Looks like Buddy Rogers, talks like 
Johnny Mack Blown, is twenty-four 
and unmarried. Croones like no bo- 
dy's anyhow. Smokes and likes to 
play Honeymoon Bridge ! Favorite 
hobby is baseball. Smiles and bows 
when number is applauded. Oh! them 
bridge woiks! Has a set of fangs that 
would do justice to any tooth-paste 
advertisement! Anyone interested fur- 
ther see the perpertrator (what a 
word, what a word) of this column 
and I will do all I can to help you 
meet him. 

While on the subject lads and las- 
sies let me tell you here and now that 
this Adonis is no sissy! I'm still try- 
ing to pull my fingers apart from 
shaking hands with him. Brute Leh- 
man thinks he will use a sling to 
aid in the repair of his injured mern 
bers. 

I know that musicians live on ap- 
plause and it is sincerely hoped by 
the music committee that proper en- 
couragement be given to the band 
on that night. Make friends with 
members of the orchestra and you 
will find them to be real people who 
appreciate your spirit. Mr. Cates is 
doing more than his share to make 
the party a success, so let's co-oper- 
ate and do our share. 0. K. ? 

At this time I wish to personally 
express my appreciation for the gen- 
erosity of Prof. Wagner for his ad- 
vice and help in planning the Junior 
Prom. He has taken full responsibil- 
ity for all conduct of students and 
we know that all concerned will gov- 
ern themselves accordingly. Such 
confidence in young people should be 
and will be, appreciated. With the 



class of students that attend this af- 
s-a.v no comeback should be offered. 
Let's all make this an affair never to 
be forgotten and next year's affair is 
a certainty. It should be and the 
future is guided by the conduct of the 
student body. inanks a lot Prof., 
maybe we can help you some day. 

The tirade has ended but the smell 
lingers, does it not? I really and 
truly promise something worth while 
in this after the Junior Prom. Not 
that the Jnuior Prom, isn't worth 
while but I imagine you are being 
over fed. Forgive me and wait. 
Someday I shall spring a good col- 
umn. 

So long and I hope you will bear 
with une until next week! 



Sandwiches Sodas 

EAT AT ROEMIG'S 

ICE CREAM 
Cigars Cigarettes 
DELICIOUS HOME MADE 



"Y" CONFERENCE 

BIG SUCCESS 



(Continued from Page 1) 



talk by Robert Roudabush on "Per- 
sonal Christian Leadership." After 
the meeting proper, a social period 
was held in which the local Y.M.C.A 
served tershements. 

Another feature of unusual interest 
was tne service at the United Bre- 
thren Church on Friday evening. It 
was here that Dr. Henry H. Crane of 



THIS IS A QUALITY SHOE 
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Hand Stitching 

W. D. ELLIOTT, JR. 

140 N. Railroad St., 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



Scranton gave an address which gave 
mpetus to the whole convention. He 
spoke on the subject, "The Price of 
Christian Leadership," and it may be 
mentioned that all who heard him 
declared that they could have listen- 
ed with pleasure for a much longer 
time. Dr. Crane is an outstanding 
Christian chaiacter with a wide field 
>f interest. At college he was active 
'n tennis, debating, dramatics, bas- 
ketball, and other activities. He had 
a great message for all. 

On Saturday morning at a business 
meeting of the Council, the following 
officers were elected for the coming 
year: President, Lewis R. Fox, Vice- 
pres'dent, (7red W. Mund, Secretary 
Robert Adams, and Treasurer, Tyr- 
rell Rcbinson. At a very impressive 

Continued on Page 4) 



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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 1931 



Among Our Seniors 





RUTH LILLER 



The girl with the contagious en- 
thusiasm and ever-ready smile! That's 
Kuth! Perhaps these qualities have 
been the secret of her amazing suc- 
cess at college, coupled, of course, 
with the will to do and the requisite 
brain power. At any rate Ruth has a 
string of honors that any girl might 
be proud to own. Some of the more 
outstanding ones are, Associate Edi- 
tor of "La Vie," Organization Editor 
of the "Quittie," Honorable Mention 
in English 26, Second Honor Student 
in her Sophomore Year, French As- 
sistant, and Day Student Representa- 
tive of the W. S. G. A. For although 
Ruth is somewhat handicapped by be- 



ing a day student, she enters into 
campus activities with all the force 
of her enthusiastic personality, and 
gets results. 

But although exteremely busy with 
her numerous and varied extra-cur- 
ricular activities, Ruth still finds time 
to spend quite a few hours in the 
physics lab. In this connection we 
have heard rumors, — merely rumors, 
— of a tall Senior from Lebanon. Let 
u ; prophesy a short teaching career, 
.vuJi! 



CHARLES WISE 



Born quite awhile ago . . . Now a 
native of Lykens ... Is a "Math" 
major ... A man of undefatiguable 



zeal ... Served on the "Quittie" last 
year . . . Shaves every three hours 
... A czar of the Men's Senate, but 
is a benevolent despot . . . Has taken 
unto himself a . . . this year . . Has 
held official positions in every organ- 
ization on the campus except Clio 
and Delphian . . . Belongs to Philo 
. . . Rooms with the great Dean Sal- 
ada . . . Does not like toothpaste, 
prefers the powder . . . Tutors a sec- 
ond year Algebra class ... Is quite 
hopeless as to their progress . . . Has 
never heard of the "Queen of Eng- 
land" . . . Will graduate with the 
Class of '31 and will no doubt suc- 
ceed ... So long "Skee" we'll see 
you anon. 



"Y" CONFERENCE 

BIG SUCCESS 



(Continued from Page 3) 



service on Sunday morning, Dr. G. 
Forris Smith, President of Susque- 
hanna University, conducted the in- 
stallation service in Philo Hall. 

Perhaps the highest point of inter- 
est in the conference was shown at 
the Lebanon Valley College Confer- 
ence banquet which was given in the 
large dining room of North Hall. 
Here, sociability was marked, and fel- 
lowship between the several delega- 
tions was greatly increased. Mr. Gos- 
sard presided as chairman of the 
gathering, and gave a very friendly 
word of welcome. The toastmaster 
for the occasion was Robert Rouda- 
bush, who, after making a few intro- 
ductory remarks, introduced the vari- 
ous speakers. The first speaker was 
L. C. Wilson of New York, who very 
forcibly declared the virtues of the 
summer conference to be held at For- 
est Park and the "Y" president's 
training conference at New York 
City. The registrar, Robert Rawhou- 
ser, then read out the number of dele- 
gates from each college. The college 
having the greatest number of stu- 
dent delegates was the State Teachers 
College at Shippensburg. For a re- 
ward this delegation reecived a set 
of books pertaining to "Y" work 
worth five dollars. Fred W. Mund 
made the presentation. The spirit 
of the banquet was kept high at all 
times by college songs and yells from 
the diffeernt groups. 

The climax of the banquet was 
reached when the two speakers of 
the evening gave their addresses. 
Philo C. Dix, State Secretary of the 
Y.M.C.A. in Pennsylvania, gave an 
address on, "The Message and Work 



of the Y. M. C. A." In a very inter- 
esting way he gave a comprehensive 
view of the "Y" work, illustrating 
his points by appropriate remarks and 
stories. The Rev. "Jack" Hart then 
spoke cn the subject, "How Can My 
Life Witness for Christ?" In his own 
energetic way "Jack" impressed 
every one with the need of witness- 
ing for Christ and for a closer walk 
with him. Popularly known as 
"Jack," he was a four letter man on 
his own campus, and he is rated as 
( ne of the great outstanding Christ- 
ian leaders of the day. The Y.W.C.A. 
of the college had its cabinet at the 
banquet as guests, and part of the 
favorable impression of the college 
that the visitors received is due to 
their presence at this occasion. 
,At the dedicatory service in Philo 



Hall on Sunday morning. "Jack" Hart 
spoke cn the topic, "Can Jesus Count 
On Me Back on the Campus?" It 
was here that he won the heart of 
every listener, and inspired all to go 
back with renewed determination to 
lead exemplary lives before their fel- 
low students. 

Although some of members were 
away on Glee Club trips and other 
necessary items of business, the local 
cabinet attended the meetings well. 
At its own cabinet meeting, a note of 
inte.est and enterprise- was sounded 
which foretells good to the campus in 
the coming year. 



A-l SKIL, 
WORKS WONDERS 





BEFORE v> ^gprJ AFTER 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 



207 W. Main 



H. GOODMAN SONS 

29 W. Sheridan Ave. 

Real Refreshments in a 
Real Way 
Ice Cream, Cakes and Pies 



Grimms Book Store 



We Have an Interesting 
Circulating Library 

Read our New Books at a 
Very Small Charge 

SENIORS 

Now is a good time to order 
NAME CARDS 



1 LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 

Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



L. V. C. LOSES TO URSINUS Patrizio, rf 5 2 2 

Reeder, p 5 2 3 

Murphy, c 3 1 1 



(Continued from Page 1) 



out but Shortledge cam ! through with 
his third hit that scored both runners 
making the sccre 7-5. 

Ursinus came back strong and put 
on a rally that you read about in 
story bocks. The first man up — a 
pir.ch hitter — hit to third and was 
out. Euchus, the next batter, got a 
clean single. Dennis and Meckleg 
followed with safe blows and the 
score stood 7-6 when Karpimn, tht 
pitcher came to bat — he smashed t 
hotsingle to left center that scored 
the two runners and sewed up the 
ball game. 

Reeder pitched wonderful ball al- 
lowing only 11 hits in 11 innings and 
striking out five men. This was a 
tough break for Tony who did his 
share in trying to win his own ball 
game. We know what to expect now 
and are looking forward to having 
a winning team. Shortledge had his 
eye on the ball getting three hits out 
of five times at bat and batting in 
three runs and scoring two himself. 

Wycoff, Patrizio and Stewart also 
had doubles but Reeder's circuit clout 
was the longest hit of the day. 

The score: 

L. V. COLLEGE 

AB. R. H. PO. A. 

Shortledge, cf 5 3 3 2 

Wycoff, 2b 4 13 3 

Stewart, 3b 6 10 2 

Light, ss 5 115 1 

Daub, If 5 

Dennis, lb 5 11 



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2 
1 2 
7 2 



Total 43 7 12 31 i 

URSINUS 

AB. R. H. PO. A. 

Seeger, 3b 2 1 i 

Shell, 3b 2 11 \ 

Noble, ss 5 3 2 

Lodge, cf 5 1 3 3 i 

Sterner, 2b 4 2 2 2 i 

Eachus, rf 5 I 2 o 

Dennis, lb 5 1 1 11 q 

Meekley, c 5 1 1 13 2 

Muller. If 4 .0 1 

Paris, p 1 2 

Karpinin, p 4 1 2 

*Hunter 1 

Totals 43 8 11 33 12 

* Batted for Miller in 11th. 

Errors, Light 2; Eachen and Cable. 
Runs batted in, Light, Reeder 2 
Shortledge 2. Wycoff 2, Sterner 3,Den- 
nis, Cable and Karpinin 2. Two base 
hits, Stewart, Wycoff, Patrizio. Three 
base hits, Shell. Home runs, Sterner 
and Reeder. Base on balls, off Reeder 
2, off Paris 1, off Karpinin 2. Sacri- 
fice hits, Wycoff, Murphy. Winning 
pitcher, Karpinin. Umpire, Wanner. 
Time of game, 2:10. 



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I 

PI 



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CONGRATULATIONS 
PHILO! 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



RAIN SATURDAY! 
MAY IT NOT 



VOLUME VIII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 7, 1931. 



NO. 8 



phi Lambda Sigma Presents Unique Anniversary Play 



PHILO COMPLETES 
ANOTHER YEAR 

OLDEST PLAY EVER TO BE 
PRESENTED; WELL 
RECEIVED 



The sixty-fourth anniversary of 
the Philokosmian Literary Society 
was held on Friday evening, May 1, 
1931, at 8 o'clock in Engle Conserva- 
tory. 

The invocation was pronounced by 
Reverend Cawley H. Stine, a former 
Philokosmian, and a graduate of the 
class of 1920, who now resides in Bal- 
timore, Md. Then Charles Wise as 
present president of Philo, welcomed 
the faculty, students and friends, and 
invited them to the reception to be 
held in the gym after the play. 

The second part of the program 
consisted of the presentation of "The 
Knight of the Burning Pestle," direct- 
ed by Dr. P. A. W. Wallace, and writ- 
ten by Beaumont and Fletcher some- 
where between the dates of 1605 and 
1615. The play is a burlesque of 
two things; first, the old-fashioned 
chivalric romances; and second, the 
people who liked them. It represents 
a typical London theatre of the year 
1611. The townspeople arrive with 
much hullaballoo to witness a play. 
Among them are a grocer and his 
wife, accompanied by their three ap- 
prentices, Ralph (Rafe), Tim, and 
George. The grocer's wife, being 
somewhat bored by the first act of 
the play, suggests that Ralph, who 
m akes some pretense of being a pub- 
lic reader, show what he can do. 
Ralph himself immediately welcomes 
the idea, dubs himself the Knight of 
the Burning Pestle, and Tim and 
George his squire and dwarf respect- 
ively. 

From then on Ralph takes charge 
01 affairs and thrusts himself and his 
companions into the action whenever 
Jt Pleases him. The main plot is that 
°f the love story of Luce Venturewell 
• (Continued on Page 3) 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Friday, May 8—8:30 P. M., Junior 
Pl "om. 

Saturday, May 9—9:30 A. M., Ten- 
ls match with Susquenhanna. 
^1:30 P. M., May Day Fete. 
"-3:30 P. M., Baseball game with 
Ur sinu s . 

Sunday, May 10—5:30 P. M., Y. W. 

• A - Friendly Hour. 

.^5:45 p. m., Y. M. C. A. Discus- 
sion. 

Monday, May 11— Baseball with 
em Ple (away). 

---8:00 P. M., Recital, Conservatory 
0f Mu S i c . 

. Tuesday, May 12—7:00 P. M., Sen- 
banquet. 

Wednesday, May 13 — Baseball, 
^inson (away). 

cital day ' May 14_ 8:00 P ' M '' Re ~ 
> Conservatory of Music. 



LIFE WORK RECRUITS 

TALK OF MISSIONS 



The Life Work Recruits held a 
meeting on Thursday, April 30, in the 
class room of the conservatory. Miss 
Ethel May Hower led in devotions. 
A poem "The World's Bible" was 
given by Miss Lucille Engle. 

The group then nominated officers 
for the ensuing year. Election will be 
held in the next business meeting. 

"The Why and How of Foreign 
Missions" was the subject of a very 
well-prepared talk given by Miss 
Coble. It was a source of inspiration 
to all those present. Miss Eva Shis- 
sler spoke on "What Can I Believe 
about Foreign Missions?", a subject 
closely allied with that of Miss Coble. 
She gave a very comprehensive dis- 
cussion. 

After a discussion on the plans for 
the next session, the meeting closed. 



JUNIATA TOP 
BLUE ANO WHITE 



JUNIATA MAKES BIG LEAD 
IN FIRST INNING 
SCORE 11-9 



The Lebanon Valley baseball team 
lost its second game of the season 
to Juniata College of Huntington, Pa. 
last Saturday on a muddy field by a 
score of 11-9. 

The game was played despite the 
postponement of other May Day ac- 
tivities and a fair crowd was on hand 
to see the locals slip and skid to de- 
feat. 

Reeder, the iron armed twirler that 
showed up so well in the Ursinus 
game started on the mound for L. V. 
but due to the slipping ball and in- 
clement weather was not very effec- 
tive. Steele the first man to face 
him, connected for a clean double to 
right field. Atolski drew a pass. An- 
drews was safe on an error, thus 
crowding the boys. LaPorte, the 
clean-up man, didn't fail his team 
mates and connected with one of 
Long's fast one for a nice double, 
scoring Steele and Atolski. Harley 
flied out and Jetty hit to short but 
Hummel lined out a three bagger to 
score LaPorte. Gray also planted one 
in the outer garden to score Hummel. 
Snyder the pitcher, hit to second to 
end the stampede. 

The home towners were retired in 
order but the visitors scored their 
sixth run on 2 errors and a walk in 
the second. This frame also saw the 
home team retired in order. 

Petty opened the third with a clean 
single and scored on a walk fielders 
choice, and sacrifice fly. Stewait op- 
ened the third for L. V. C. with a 
nice single but Dennis flied out and 
Murphy struck out in order. Patrizio 
was safe on an error and a score 
looked evident but Shortledge with a 
man on second and third hit to short 
to retire the side. 

The fourth was scoreless for both 
Continued on Page 4) 



MAY DAY TO BE 
THIS SATURDAY 



RAIN CHECKS GIVEN TO 
VISITORS ON MAY 
DAY 



It is true that "one little raindrop 
doesn't make a shower," but it so 
happened last Saturday that many 
raindrops conspired to spoil a very 
well-prepared May Day festival. The 
hopes of the fair sex of gaily trip- 
ping forth in their flimsy garments 
before a vast expectant audience 
were cruelly shattered. Also, the 
male students of Terpsichore, who 
with such a reluctant willingness had 
consented to ''sling a wicked foot," 
were woefully disappointed upon see- 
ing the floodgates of heaven opened. 
However, with one accord and each in 
his own way, all accepted the fortune 
that fate had decreed and called upon 
Somnus for another hour or two of 
sleep. 

The affair will be held on May 9th, 
weather conditions parmitting. This 
will give a week of extra practice, and 
with a good bit more of advertising 
there premises to be a large crowd. 
Besides the attraction of some very 
novel numbers on the program, there 
will be a larger orchestra to play the 
dance music than ever before. Tfis 
is under the direction of Prof. Malsh. 
Those who had classes on the west 
side of the "Ad" building on Friday 
morning can testify as to the enter- 
taining nature of the college orches- 
tra. 



MISS SPESSARD '13 

SPEAKER IN CHAPEL 



On Monday morning, May 4, the 
student body was honored with the 
presence of Miss Lottie Spessard, a 
member of the class of 1913 of L.V.C. 

Miss Spessard, a missionary to the 
Philippines, spoke for a half hour 
on some of the customs in the Philip- 
pines. Several of her illustrations 
were very interesting, especially 
those pertaining to Filipino love- 
making. She also gave the circum- 
stances of the origin of the "Alma 
Mater" of which her brother was one 
of the composers. 

Lebanon Valley is proud tc wel- 
come Miss Spessard as a successful 
alumnus. 



CONSERVATORY NOTES 



The Men's Glee Club climaxed a 
successful season Saturday evening, 
May 2, by entertaining the music-lov- 
ing people of the vicinity with their 
varied program. The numbers, were 
exceptionally well rendered and the 
solo work was highly commendable. 
The club, under the direction of Prof. 
Alexander Crawford, is a splendid or- 
ganization and judging from the ap- 
plause which issued from the large 
audience Saturday evening, the sing- 
ers are recognized as having real 
talent. 



Last Meeting of Reader's 

Club; Successful Year 



The Readers Club of Lebanon Val- 
ley College held their monthly meet- 
ing at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Paul 
Wallace, on the evening of Tuesday, 
May 5. 

The club discussed War Literature 
and several members of the club gave 
some interesting discussions on the 
different periods. Miss Henrietta 
Wagner spoke on Robert Graves, the 
well known poet. Mr. Shellenberger 
gave a very interesting talk on that 
versatile person, Lowell Thomas. This 
speech was the climax of the even- 
ing. The concluding talk was given 
by Miss Ethel May Hower on "The 
Budgomaster." 

After the literary discussion had 
ended, the club held a short business 
meeting and finally decided to dis- 
perse the club for the remainder of 
the year. 

The Readers Club has been one of 
the busiest little clubs on the cam- 
pus. They have had a very suc- 
cessful year. They have been under 
the guidance of Dr. Paul Wallace with 
Mr. Paul Evancoe acting as Presi- 
dent. They close their season looking 
back on many happy evenings spent 
discussing the leading classics and 
visits to leadig theatres of near-by 
cities. 



EDDIE EDWARDS 
TO PLAY AT PROM 



CATES UNABLE TO PLAY 
JUNIORS FORTUNATE TO 
OBTAIN EDWARDS 



Due to Dame Fate it is with sinc- 
ere regret that we announce the fact 
that Opie Cates will not be able to 
play for the Junior Prom. The com- 
mittee was notified that Mr. Cates re- 
cently was signed by Music Corpora- 
tion of America and is playing a two 
months' contract in Lexington, Ky. 
The contract was signed by the proper 
authorities on the campus but not by 
Cates manager, so no action other 
than to hire another good orchestra 
could be taken. 

Mr. Keats, the manager of Opie 
Cates, recommended Eddie Edwards 
and his Silver Slipper orchestra of 
New York. A long distance phone 
call to New York and after a long con- 
versation the contract was mailed. 
The regrettable part of the affair is 
not that a band of less name and 
quality has been secured as it is a 
better organization, but the fact that 
so many had planned on seeing Cates 
himself play. However, Mr. Keats 
assured us that this organization 
would satisfy the crowd as well as 
the band originally planned on. 

Eddie Edwards is playing the So- 
phomore dance of N. Y. U. on Satur- 
day, May 9th, at the Hotel New 
Yorker. He has been during the past 
two years at the Silver Slipper Ball- 
( Continued on Page 4) 



ST. JOHN'S WINS 
IN TENNIS 



RAUB AND MILLER WIN 
SINGLES AND DOUBLES 
MATCH 7-3 



The tennis team suffered their sec- 
ond defeat of the season last week 
at the hands of St. John's of Meadow- 
brook. It was the visitors fifth 
straight victory in as many starts. 

Donmoyer, playing his first match 
since receiving a hand injury in Lan- 
caster, lost his first inter-collegiate 
match 9-7, 8-6, 6-4. He was way off 
form due to lack of practice but much 
credit must be given his opponent. 

Hutchinson lost in straight sets but 
Rank and Heller both won their sing- 
les matches. Bowers playing fifth 
man, lost his match also. 

With the score standing 3-2 and two 
doubles yet to play L.V.C. had no 
hope of winning the match but a tie 
was possible. 

Hutchinson and Donmoyer lost 
their doubles thus giving St. John's 
the match but this did not discourage 
Rank and Miller — coming from behind 
they took the last two sets to give 
L.V.C. 3 out of the 7 matches. 

Rain caused the postponement of 
the Dickinson match scheduled for 
last Saturday but the team went to 
Elizabethtown Wednesday for a 
match. The next home match is the 
15th of May with Juniata unless a 
fill-in match is scheduled for May 
Day. The team is in good shape now 
and Prof. Stevenson predicts a good 
season despite the two deefats thus 
far. 



HISTORY CLUB DISCUSSES 
MERIT OF HOOVER 



In a short but worthwhile meeting, 
the History Club met Wednesday eve- 
ning May 6th. The subject under dis- 
cussion was, "Is Hoover a Success or 
a Failure?" Lollita Mummert, as a 
loyal Republican, upheld Herbert 
Hoover as a most excellent and effi- 
cient ruler of our country. By bring- 
ing to our attention some of his note- 
worthy achievements she was able to 
cite some convincing points favoring 
the president. Gladys Hershey, as an 
anti-Hooverist, endeavored to break 
down the arguments as tendered by 
Miss Mummert and brought forth 
some excellent material, decidedly un- 
favorable to the present head of U.S. 

After the two speeches of the eve- 
ning, the meeting was thrown open 
for discussion. 



FACULTY NOTES 



We are very glad to have Dr. Light 
back with us again. For several 
weeks he was confined to his home 
•and was unable to meet his classes. 



4 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 7, 1931. 



Hie Collertktme 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



1 weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Ruth Shroyer. '32 Editor-in-Chief 

Fred Mund. VZ2. Associate Editor 

Hilda D. Buckley. '32. .Associate Editor 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32 

Associate Editor 
Waiter Krumbiegel, '33, 

Managing Editor 



RBl'ORTOUIAL STAFF 

Elizabeth Ulrich, '32 

Edward Shellenberger, '33 

Edmund Umberger, '34..Gen'l Reportei 

Dorothy Garber. '32 General Reporter 

George Snowhill, '34 Conservator 

Percy Clements. '33 Athletic- 

Jane Muth. '33 ». ..Clionian 

Arline Heckrote, '33 Delphian 

Clarence Earley, *33. ...... .Kalozetean 

Chester Goodman, '33 Philokosmian 

Gloria Lavanture, *33. . Alumni Reportei 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Robert Rawhouser, "32, . ■ I'**) 
Business Manasei 

Herman Mariano, '33. 

Ass't Business Managei 
Paul; Kleinfelter, '32, 

, '-Circulation Managei 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies . . 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year- 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



A HOMER 



They call it the great American 
sport — this baseball, but I fiimly be- 
lieve that the students in this schoo: 
must have been sojourning in foreign 
countries most of their lives if we 
are to judge from the enthusiasm and 
spirit shown at the games. 

Not more than a hundred peopk 
there and the greater number of those 
were visitors, no cheering done ancl 
too much razzing — such was the situ- 
ation Saturday afternoon at the Juni- 
ata-L.V. game. 

Of course everyone was disappoint- 
ed because of the weather canditions 
forcing the committee to postpone 
the May Day festivities but at least 
we did have the ball game. The en 
tire student body should have found 
their way to the athletic field and 
shown their love of the game by 
cheering their boys. Instead a 
mere handful attended and then alj 
the comments you heard were de- 
cidedly not complimentary. A few 
stayed for the entire game, the rest 
wended their homeward way after the 
third inning. What is the matter, 
students? Why don't you put some 
pep and life in the games? The ex- 
pression noticed on some of the faces 
is similar to that seen on the visages 
of bored persons listening to an ex 
ceedingly dry lecture. You don't have 
to be punished in that way. Fill 
yourself with some ethusiasm and lei 
it fly forth at these games. You can 
help to win the contests if you so 
choose. Why, there was more spirit, 
more pep, more vim, vigor and vi- 
tality in evidence on the old lot where 
we played ball as "kids." There the 
game was played for the mere pleas- 
ure, the enjoyment. Many duties 
were shirked, many other pastimes 
ignored in order to bat the old ball 
over the fenec. Now these same boys 
have grown up and strange to say. 
they have apparently left the love of 
the game back in the old lot. 

If someone were to visit one of Our 
baseball games for the first time, he 
would be utterly amazed. We do not 
have a baseball audience. I sincerely 
believe that these same collegiates be- 
come more excited on hearing the 
league games announced over the air 
Here they can get the broadcasting at 
first hand and it does not cause a 
flicker of the eyelash on some of the 
would-be promoters. 

What is the matter? The game de- 
pends to a great extent on you — 
whether or not it's going to be vic- 



tory or defeat. How much confidence 
do you think a team can have when 
the students do not even cheer or put 
in a word of encouragement when 
they are on the lower end of the 
score. Everything, regardless of its 
strength, needs cooperation. Let's 
all pull together and give L. V. a 
winning team. You can help by at- 
tending and when you are there, let 
the boys on .the team know it. They 
will be glad to see you and will, no 
doubt, give you a hearty welcome. 
You supported basketball and foot- 
ball. Don't slight the great American 
sport. 




After some of the howling examples 
of "columnicide" recently exhibited, 
it does us good to read the poem print- 
ed last week in the Philadelphia Re- 
cord. This poem, which extols the vir- 
tues of EtaOin, Shrdlu, and ZZZZZZ, 
shows that we are not alone in oui 
affliction. 

* Arnold Bennett, the English novelist 
who died lately, is receiving his due 
post-mortem attention, and reams of 
copy have been written about him. 
One fact of interest has been brought 
out: Bennett was one of the few au 
thors who applied business methods 
to writing. If he made an agreement 
to write a certain number of words 
he would write just that many, and 
if he wrote a few more by any chance 
he would demand payment for them 
Perhaps the rate of this payment 
explains the whole matter. Bennett 
was one of the most highly paid oi 
modern authors. For newspaper ar- 
ticles, the lowest rate he was paid 
was two shillings, or about fifty cents 
a word. Who would not be carefu 1 
with words at that price? 

We Americans should not feel toe 
proud of our "bicated riches," for 
had not Queen Isabelle of Spain beer 
a poor financier, it is possible that 
affairs would be quite different or 
this side of the Atlantic. Mr. C. J 
Starkey, a statistician, says that the 
worthy queen made a great mistake 
when she, sold her jewels, worth $6,- 
000, in order to finance Columbus ir 
his voyage of discovery. If she had 
invested trfe $6,000 at five per cent in- 
terest, to be compounded semi-annu 
ally, the total todny would . be ove 
four and a half trillion dollars, man^ 
limes the value of the entire United 
States. We wonder. 

The British, although they should 
not have time for such frivolity, have 
followed our example and listen over 
the radio to an English version of 
the Amos 'n Andy team, a pair of 
broadcasters named Alexander and 
Mose. These entertainers speak with 
an Oxford accent and their sallies are 
said to be representative of true Brit- 
ish wit. The Anglo-Alabamans con- 
clude their program by singing "In 

My 'Appy 'Udson River 'Ome." 

* * * 

George F. Baker, reputed to be the 
nation's third richest man, died re- 
cently in New York City. The ninety- 
one year-old financier was known as 
the "Sphinx of Wall Street." His for- 
tune is estimated to be $500,000,000 
During his life he made many public 
benefactions and donated large sums 
to colleges. Baker field, Columbia 
University, is one of his gifts. 

* * * 

The great Empire State building in 
New. York City has been officially 
opened and steps formally into its 
place as the world's largest structure. 
Eiffel Tower, in Paris, was long the 
world's tallest building at one thou- 
sand feet, but the new giant tops the 
French tower by two hundred fifty 
feet. The building is said to be an 



imposing structure, with its metal fa- 
cades and tall mooring mast on the 
top. Former Govei-nor Alfred E. 
Smith is the head of the building's 
administration. 

\ ?i 4 >'- * ' * '* * ^ ' 

May Day, to most college students, 
means the time for the crowning of a 
queen and the dancing of dances, but 
to Communists and members of other 
radical parties, the day is one of de- 
monstrations and is a time for the 
traditional protest of radiacls. This 
year the "worker's holiday" was ex- 
pected to be exceptionally noisy and 
wild, but, contrary to the opinions 
of police and others, the day passed 
otl' comparatively quietly. 
•J ■ V* * * \ 

We have read of smuggling by 
means of liquor, silks, jewels, tobac- 
co, and other valuable articles were 
slipped' into countries where they did 
not legally belong, but the smuggling 
of dead bodies is new to us. How- 
ever, the London Express reports that 
such smuggling is taking place in 
England; that the bodies of English 
soldiers are brought from Belgium to 
England for reburial. The smugglers 
charge as high as $2500 for one body 
delivered in England, but the prices 
vary according to the ability of the 
family to pay. 



Y. W. C. A. NOTES 



The Y. W. C. A. Friendly Hour 
service was to have been given by 
the Alumnae on Sunday evening but, 
due to their failure to appear the 
meeting was of necessity impromptu. 
Miriam Owen read as a Scripture les- 
son Matt. 11:1-10, after which Sara 
Ensminger led in prayer. Henrietta 
Wagner read an article in which the 
Y. W. C. A. was likened to a labora- 
tory in which individuals are con- 
sidered in the light of their abilities 
and potentialities and helped to live a 
fuller, more fruitful lives. Marion 
Kruger very sweetly sang a selection 
After a number of songs by the whole 
group, the meeting was closed by the 
Mizpah benediction. 




It was too bad that so many of our 
Alumni were disappointed last week- 
end, but we hope that they will come 
back with us next week to help us 
celebrate our May Day. 

Among those that I happened to 
see were: Hilda Hess, '29; Florence 
Dundorf, '27; Walter Ness, '27; Doro- 
thy Heister, '30; Jane Fearnow, '29; 
Hazel Bailey, '29; Roy Flook, '28; 
Harvey Nitrauer, '25; Milford Knise- 
ly, '28; Paul Barnhart, '30; William 
Myers, '30; Lanston Mentzer, '29; Mr. 
and Mrs. Wade Miller, '27; Elizabeth 
Hoy, '30; Corrine Dyne, '30; Nancy 
Ulrich, '29; Mar y McCurdy, '30; Irene 
Peters, '30; Fay Baekman, '30; Roy 
Albright, '30; Ira Mater, '29; William 
Grill, '26; Oscar Stambaugh, '30; Al- 
cesta Slicter, '30; John Beattie, '29; 
Gladys Knaub, '30; Luella Lehman, 
'27; Elizabeth Matthes, '29; Bernita 
Stre ; big, '30; Alex Myers, '30; and 
Edgar Shroyer, '30. 

Don't forget! We'll be looking for 
you again this week-end and all the 
others who intended to come but stay- 
ed away on account of the rain. 



Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Cooley announce 
the birth of a daughter, Dorothy 
Ann. Mrs. Sooley was formerly Dor- 
othy Longenecker, '25. They now re- 
side at Bloomsburg, N. J. 



Mr| and Mrs. Warren Fox announce 
the birth of a daughter, Monday May 
4, 1931. Mr. and Mrs. (Fox both 
graduated in the class of 1927. Mrs. 
Fox was formerly Blanche Stager. 



They now reside at 437 Harris St., 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



Miss Lottie Spessard '13, who is 
now a missionary in the Philippines, 
gave us a very interesting talk in 
Chapel on Monday morning. She 
somewhat compared the little tricks 
that the young folks play there, with 
those of our own college folks. I sup- 
pose we are the same the world over. 



FROSH THOUGHTS 



The following poems are the work 
of several budding poets in the 
Freshman Class, under the instruc- 
tion of Miss Mary K. Wallace. 



RHAPSODY IN BLUE 



Eyes of blue, 

(Float before my eyes. 

Skies of blue, 

Through which a robin flies. 
Thoughts of blue, 
Remembering the past. 
Thoughts of you. 
Sometimes between long shadows on 
the grass; 
The little waves of sunlight pass. 
My eyes grow dim with tenderness, 
the while; 
Thinking I see thee, — thinking I 
see thee smile. 

And sometimes in the twilight gloom 
apart; 

The tall trees nvhisper, whisper, 
heart to heart. 
From my fond lips the eager answers 
fall, 

Thinking I hear thee. — thinking I 
hear thee call. 

- . m . ■ : 
THE STUDENT'S NEMESIS 



Examination time; that is the time 
We all to chapel hall repair, 
With minds we've tried to prime. 
Once in that fateful room, we vic- 
tims are 
As sheep, about to leap a rift 
To peace, removed afar. 
A nervous tension holds, and clam- 
my hands 
Are pressed up to arrest the yawns 
That rise without command. 
The dread professor comes, and in 
his arms 
Are piled the tortures; mild, he 

claims. 
His fibs are our alarms. 

Upon the rack we're placed, and 
silence, reigns; 
Although our writing low does scratch 
When thoughts are worth the pains. 
And then the ordeal's o'er, and we 
are free. 

The gap is crossed, though lap the 
word 

Should be, as we shall see. 

This is the student's plight; for in 
this rhyme 
Are told the fears that hold us at 
Examination time. 

Dear teacher, this we beg: wield 
mercy there. 
To make us glad, please take from us 
All vestiges of care. 



APRIL NIGHT 



.The leaves blow gently in the April 
Above, the velvet curtain of the night 
Studded with diamonds; and, below, 

,The world lies dreaming. The nale 
moon 

[A silver lamp upon a bed of dark — 

and I, alone, 
iWith only memories. 

The night bird calling to his mate, 
|A silence — then, from out the dusky 
pine 

: Comes back his answer; his beloved 
J Waiting for him, in the shadow. I re- 
membered 
That other April night, when you 



called me — 
And, I, too, answered. 



LAB 



Every Thursday afternoon, 
As soon as lunch is done, 
We get dressed to go to lab 
To have a lot of fun. 

Slowly saunters in the class 
With faces long and sad. 
They'd prefer a tennis game 
To this old smelly lab. 

So, when teacher leaves the hoom 
The boys perform some tricks; 
Put in some of this and that; 
Then mix and mix and mix. 

Soon there is an awful bang, 
The pieces fly about, 
Girls let out a muffled shriek, ; 
Prof comes in without a doubt. 

■ '•• ' [ \\\ 1 

Reminds them they're in college now 
Should act like college boys, 
And never wants to hear again, 
Such obstreperous a noise. 

Some one gets his unknown, then 
And all rush there to see, 
Just if, by any chance of fate, 
Theirs too, like his might be. 

And so the afternoon goes on, 
With much less work than play 
And people dwindle gradually 
There's no more use to stay. 



Things I Never Noticed Until Now— 
The Co-Eds Going Into a Muddle 
Over the Prom . . . 



Sophomores in the Library trying 
to read Matthew Arnold with a com- 
prehensive look on his face . ... 
about this time of the year the tour- 
ists company send you beautiful and 
illustrated booklets on foreign coun- 
tries when you are trying to keep 
your mind on May Day and the fastly 
approaching exams ... a negress 
trying to get drunk by soaking moth- 
balls in gasoline . . . students suck- 
ing in their breath when they are 
told the price of the new text book 
in the library . . . There he goes 
again, if he tells this joke again 
once more this semester I'll have to 
pass his course . . . The Editor of this 
paper running around with pink 
paper under her arm and a worried 
look on her face . . . the despairing 
look on the Post Masters face when 
we come tearing in for mail after 
lunch ... the beauty near our school 
especially near the water works . • • 
the giggle of a co-ed when its perfect- 
ly calm on the campus . . . the me- 
lancholy sound of the wind on an 
April night ... it kinda grips you 
and makes you think of home and 
the fire place . . . The best show we 
have seen in two months was "The 
Great Meadow" and we saw it right 
here in Annville . . . the nonchalant- 
ness of the "skirts" when they walk 
in class late. . . . the genius and su- 
perbness of "Ethan Frome" . • • the 
quaint dutch bonnets that co-eds are 
starting to wear . . . the untirinf 
efforts of Miss Fencil in her working 
for May Day . . . 



When You Leave College . • 
We Suggest You Take Along 

"Baptiste Laroque" 
Leg-ends of French Canada 
by 

Paul A. W. Wallace. 
The Price - - $1.50 

The Place 
K. S. BOLLMAN 
Bookseller & Stationer 
33 South Eighth Street 
Lebanon, Penna. 

BOWMAN'S 

33 South Eighth Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 7, 1931. 



PAGE THREE 



ow, 



wr- 
ite 



fing 
om- 

our- 
and 
jun- 
iceep 
istly 
;ress 
oth- 
uck- 
are 
book 
goes 
gain 
e to 
this 
pink 
rried 
iring 
vhen 
after 
;hool 

fect- 
me- 

ri an 
you 
and 

n * e 
"The 
right 
,lant- 
walk 
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. the 
3 are 
irinf 
rking 




And still they keep pouring in ! 
Ever since I applied for help in writ- 
ing this column I have a room so full 
f mail that it looks like a post office 
convention. I need help, that's all 
there's to it. 

pELP WANTED, Female: Co-ed; 
preferably good-looking, to assist 
Boomerang Editor in opening and 
sorting mail. Apply, Post Office Box 
No. 186, Annville, Penna. 

Below are again published some of 
the many contributions from our vari- 
our readers. 



A lot of good reports have come 
from the newly organized Rifle Club. 



"He's just another heat and run 
lover," whispered she as the boy 
friend left at ten thirty. 



A: She tries so hard to appear nat- 
ural. 

B: That dress ought to be a big 
help. 



Father: Did you look through the 
keyhole in the parlor? 
Son: Yes, Papa. 

Father: And what did you find out? 
Son: The lights, Father. 



A speakeasy is a place where you 
can't flash a fifty dollar bill more than 
once in one. evening. 



Beak: Why so sad?- 
Itch: I just heard a good recipe for 
home brew, and I haven't got a home. 



Some girls like men who are cave- 
men and rough; But most of them 
like the man who has something ten- 
der about him — legal tender. 



Counsel: Do you realize you are 
facing the electric chair? 

Prisoner: I don't mind facing it — 
it's sitting in it that gets me wor- 
ried. 



Dirt Hunter: I hear this play "Hot 
Desire" is simply terrible. 

Likewise: My dear it's even better 
than that. 



Prof. Light: "... furthermore, 
people's biological urge grows less 
after they become twenty years old." 

Usual Voice: My gosh, I've only 
got a year in which to make bad. 



Bunk: How big is your skating 
rink ? 

Sunk: It seats two thousand. 



Joe: What makes you eat ice-cream 
first and your soup last? 

Ike: My stomach's upset, so I eat 
m y food backwards. 



The American home mu*st be pre- 
served at all costs. Yes, even if we 
have to hire someone to stay in it. 



John: What is a boycott? 
Mim: A davenport's brother. 

X: What do you think of this ban 
on Rye? 

^2: I li^ sw i ss eheese on white 
better. 



Fred: I'm dragging a date to the 
dar ice tonight. 
Le e J.: Goucher girl? 
^ re d: Sure, got yours? 



She: Are you serious? 
No. Armenian. 




The dawn of another busy week! 
With each day lengthened one hour 
the day is yet too short! I somehow 
can't get used to this new fangled 
time. It seems like I arise in the 
middle of the night, eat lunch where 
breakfast ought to be, dinner in the 
middle of the afternoon and go to bed 
with the proverbial "chickens!" Hope 
to get adjusted soon or buy one ol 
Mr. Ingersoll's best to keep me in- 
formed. 

What the mail won't bring forth! 
Each day something new. The only 
unity in mail is at the first of eacn 
month! The other day I was in reci- 
pient of a very savorious piece of 
correspondence! (one breath too) 
Some kind gent, on the campus (who 
L know, but won't tell) sent me a 
dandy contrib. It was a peach, but 
if I print it just now I am afraid 1 
might miss out on examinations. The 
only way I would hand it in would 
be if I were on a bus or train back 
to good Ioway [ Not that I don't ap- 
preciate the help as I need it, but 
timidity and self preservance keeps 
me duty bound. 'Tis a biting bit of 
satire and using it as a criterion next 
year's year book should be a wow! 
I'm sorry pal, but you and I are in 
no position just at this time to go 
home. My folks wouldn't understand 
or appreciate the circumstances. My 
Pater would be most brutal! He might 
put me to work! Mother would be hor- 
rified and the town Sewing Circle 
would go into session without further 
ado! I have no desire to see this 
August group of females go to bat. 
They call it the Ladies Aid. What 1 
"calls" it can't be printed in the Eng- 
lish language. A fitting title would 
be The Downfall of Man, in one quilt 
'or sheet! 

People who were disappointed in 
the post-ponement of the May Day 
exercises should consider themselves 
consoled. Look at me! 

Upon seeing the dismal weather 
last Saturday, I shook the feathers 
off and gave vent to much rejoicing! 
Rain, the heaven-sent-gift to the 
farmers and I. The scourge of the 
Malays. The rain that drenches and 
cools a sweltering city. The staff of 
agriculture, and, to see students show- 
ing verbal disgust at it's presence ir- 
ritated me somewhat. My prayers 
were answered. No May Day. No 
dancing on the green. No twisting of 
ribbons on the May Pole. No intri- 
cate gyrations that cause directors to 
loose store teeth! Alas! woe is me 
— May Day this Saturday! 

h? YOU HAVEN'T MADE UP 
YOUR MIND ABOUT GOING TO 
THE JUNIOR PROM. GO ANY- 
WAY. IF YOU DON'T LIKE IT 
YOU CAN GRIPE ABOUT IT 
LATER, BUT WE DON'T WANT TO 



HEAR OF ANYONE "SINGIN' THE 
BLUES" BECAUSE THEY NEVER 
HAD A CHANCE TO HAVE ANY 
FUN. LET'S EVERYONE GO AND 
HAVE A GOOD TIME. 

Gladys Hershey (the demure one 
from South Hall) asked me today 
when I found time to write this col- 
umn. I don't Gladys, it is just like 
hash, it accumulates. 

'Tis the hour of repast and no col- 
umnist regardless of how rotten he is 
must eat, so until next week — "Oily 
war." SEE YOU ALL AT THE 
PROM. 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



PHILO COMPLETES 

ANOTHER YEAR 



(Continued from Page 1) 



and Jasper Merrythought. Mr. Ven- 
turewell, a merchant, is determined 
that his daughter Luce shall marry 
Humphrey, a silly half-witted fellow, 
but Luce inclines toward the hand- 
some Jasper, upon whom, however, 
her father looks with disfavor. Mis- 
tress Merrythought is anxious that 
Jasper should leave home so that she 
may be able to favor more openly 
Michael, his brother, a pale and sick- 
ly youth. Mr. Merrythought, who 
spends most of his time imbibing at 
the ale-house, is usually too drunk to 
know or care what is happening to 
his family. So Jasper has plenty of 
opportunity to court Luce. They fin- 
ally meet in a forest, the same one 
to which has come Michael Merry- 
thought accompanied by his mother, 
who has fled the nerve-racking at- 
mosphere of her household. When Mr. 
Venturewell learns from Humphrey of 
the plight of his daughter and Jasper, 
he is furious, but later when Jasper's 
ghost, as he thinks, appears to him, 
Venturewell relents. In the mean- 
time Ralph on his travels as a knight 
arrives at the forest and extends his 
aid to Mistress Merrythought and 
Michael. Their adventures with a 
tapster and a barber are extremely 
ludicrous, especially Ralph's knightly 
combat with the latter, who, though 
of gigantic stature, does not succeed 
in overcoming him. (Finally Mistress 
Merrythought and her son, weary of 
their travels, return home, as do also 
Luce and Jasper, the former to re- 
ceive the hearty welcome of Merry- 
thought, and the latter the paterna' 
blessing. , 
For the last act of the play, th- 
grocer and his wife are requested to 
state their preference for the scene 
of the action. They select the King 
of Moldavia's court. Then ensues a 
short scene between the Princess and 
Ralph, and at the very last, a grand 
finale. All the characters appear on 
the stage and sing boisterously a 
farewell song, with Merrythought in 



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drunken hilariousness, acting as lead- 
er. t 
The curtains remained open during 
the entire performance, change of 
scene being represented by changing 
the placards on an easel at the back 
of the stage, as change of act, by a 
dancing boy. The costumes were typi- 
cal of the Seventeenth century, — long 
flowing gowns for the ladies, and 
doublet and hose for the gentlemen. 
An additional characteristic touch was 
added by the long pipes which tht 
townspeople smoked during the play. 
The stage property was of the very 
simplest, the forest being represented 
by small trees painted on cardboard 
fastened to sticks, and placed in tin 
cans. 

Some of the acting was especially 
meritorious, notably that of Robert 
Eshleman as Ralph, a pale and de- 
formed lad who, after each dramatic 
outburst was shaken by great fits ol 
coughing. His two attendants, Paul 
Emenheiser as the squire, and J/hn 
Hughes as the dwarf, added much hu- 
mor to the play. Earl Wolfe, as Mer- 
rythought, portrayed to perfection the 
d.fficult part of a riotous drunkard 
Anna Kiehl as Luce, exactly fitted 
the role of the sweet and gentle 
heroine, while Helen Franklin as the 
dancing boy executed excellently the 
dances which marked the ends of the 
acts. The entire cast follows: — 

Prologue Boy, Servant, another 

Servant Woodrow Dellinger 

Another Boy who Dances 

Miss Helen Franklin 

A Citizen Kermit Taylor 

Ralph (Rafe), his Apprentice 

Robert Eshleman 

Tim, another Apprentice 

Paul Emenheiser 

George, another Apprentice 

John Hughes 

Venturewell, a Merchant 

Paul Evancoe 

Humphrey Frederick Mund 

Merrythought Earl Wolf 

Jasper, his son Paul Keene 

Michael, another Son .... Amos Knisely 

Tapster Fred Christman 

Barber Francis Ban 

Luce, daughter of Venturewell 

Anne Kiehl 



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Mistress Merrythought 

Elizabeth Lefevre 

Pompiana, daughter of *ne King 

of Maidavia - Evangeline Salorio 

Gentlemen 

Stuart Werner, Samuel Ulrich 

Waits 

Fred Mund, Harry Zech, Carl 
Myers 

After the play the Philos were hosts 
to the audience at the reception in 
the gymn. They had the place cozily 
decorated with a canopy of crepe 
paper streamers, and floor lamps 
here and there furnished a soft glow. 
After the refreshments had been 
served, there was dancing till 12. 

Philo thus completed another suc- 
cessful anniversary. In presenting a 
play such as the "Knight of the Burn- 
ing Pestle," which was the oldest play 
ever presented on the campus, Philo 
has afforded an opportunity to the 
students and friends of the college to 
witness a production of the old Eng- 
lish stage, a privilege which is much 
to be appreciated. 

The chairmen of the committees 
are as follows: — 

Invitation Francis Barr 

Decoration Preston Kohler 

Refreshments Stuart W. Werner 

Seating Harold Watkins 

Program Earl Wolf 

Music J. Robert Eshleman 

Alumni Robert Rawhouser 

Head Usher .... Edward Shellenberger 

Stage Manager Earl Wolf 

Properties John Hughes 

Costumes Frederick Christman 



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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 7, 1931. 



Among Our Seniors 



•>t».M 





SARA ENSMINGER 



One of the busiest and most depend- 
able girls on the campus, such is Sara. 
Regardless of what you ask her to 
do, if it is within her power to do 
so, she is only too anxious to help. 
Sara is interested in everything, she 
is wide awake always. She has an in- 
finite zest and zeal for doing things. 
Work is worship to her, we might 
say. She delights in doing and ac- 
complishing and she takes great plea- 
sure in viewing the finished product. 

Sara has done more than her share 
in school activities. Whether it is in 
society, class or college — Sara is at 
the front ready to serve. As the past 



year's Y. W. C. A. president Sara did 
a real share in furthering the "Y" 
work and it is to her that we owe 
our thanks for completing a success- 
ful year. 

Sara is an almost unequalled 
friend. She believes implicitly that 
"friendship is pure gold." As we say, 
"a man is known by his friends." 
;3ara's are many. To her we can wish 
la m st successful career. 



RUSSELL ETTER 



Among the scholastic lights of the 
Senonr class is this pedantic chap — 
a true scholar. Few indeed are gifted 
with an insatiable curiosity for learn- 



ing and the desire to satisfy that 
curiosity, but he is one. 

Last year the lucid editorials of this 
paper were written by him and it 
was certainly obvious that they be- 
trayed a mind uncommon. Besides 
having edited this paper, he was the 
captain of the debating team. In this 
forensic field he again was head and 
shoulders above the rest. With these 
divine gifts what else can we predict 
for him but success. 

No doubt he will resent our ac- 
claiming his attributes, true as they 
are, because of his modesty. He in- 
deed is a likeable and conversant 
fellow 



JUNIATA TOPS 

BLUE AND WHITE 



(Continued from Page 1) 



teams despite the fact that the first 
two men up for L.V.C. connected for 
clean singles. Poor bnse running and 
good fielding on the part of the vis- 
itors prevented the score. 

A walk and two hits gave the vis- 
itors their eighth run in the fifth but 
L. V. C. was again retired in order. 
Tho sixth was another scoreless in- 
ning with one hit bounding off the bat 
of Wycoff, who had three for the 
day. 

The seventh was the most exciting 
frame of the game. Juniata scored one 
run on a triple by Snyder and sacri- 
ficed fly to Steele. Lebanon Valley 
came up with a gambler's chance 
and scored two runs without a hit 
on one walk and three errors. 

The eighth was another cheer 
bringing inning. Juniata scored two 
runs on hits by LaPorte and Harly, J 
an i an error L. V. C. was not to be 
out done scoring four runs before 
thoir half of the frame was over. 
Stewart. Trezise batting for Patri- 
nis and Murphy walked filling the 
bifes. Williams singled, scoring 
Stewart. Tregise batting for Patri- 
zio, struck out. Wycoff connected for 
a three bagger scoring Daub and he 
scored later on an error. 

The first frame was very one- 
sided. Juniata was retired in order, 
but Light, first man up, singled and 
Stewart followed with another. Den- 
nis came thru with the third one 
scoring Light. Murphy hit to the 
second baseman but Williams con- 
nected for the evident scoring Stew- 
art. Daub singled and then Kraybill 



playing left field in placs of Patrizio, 
hit to second base to end the fracas. 

The game was one of the most un- 
usual played on the local diamond in 
years. Coming from behind what 
seemed to be an impossible lead to 
overtake the locals made a real game 
of it. Wood on the mound for the 
first time this season showed good 
form but toward the latter part of 
the ganje lost his control. Daub who 
relieved him in the 7th, gave up three 
hits in the three inings he pitched. 
Williams who replaced Nye in right 
field collected two hits out of four 
trips to the plate. One was, a homer 
and the longest hit of the day. Daub 
also had a nice solid three bagger. 

The next game is with Ursinus 



here next Saturday, and the boys are 
out to avenge the 11 -inning defeat 
handed them last week at College- 
ville. 

Box score: 

JUNIATA 

AB. R. H. PO A. 

Steele, cf 6 2 2 

Atalski, rf 2 10 

Andrews lb 4 10 9 

LaPorte, 2b 6 2 2 3 4 

Harley, 3b ..... ..3 112 1 

Petty, c 4 110 1 



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SENIORS 

Now is a good time to order 
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LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 

Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



Hummel, rf 4 110 1 

Gracy, ss 4 1113 

Snyder, p 4 12 1 

Fraker, p 1 11 

Peel, rf 1 2 

Blaugh, p 1 10 



Totals 41 11 10 27 11 

L. V. COLLEGE 

AB. R. H. PO A. 

*Trezise 1 

*Trezise, 2b 1 

Patrizio, If 3 3 

Kraybill, cf 1 

Shortledge, cf 4 7 1 

Wycoff, 2b 4 13 3 3 

Light, ss 5 12 14 

Nye, rf 1 

Reeder, p 1 1 

Stewart, 3b 4 3 2 1 3 

Dennis, lb 4 17 

Murphy, c 4 2 1 

Williams, rf 4 3 2 

Wood, p 1 

Daub, p. 3 12 10 



Totals 40 9 12 27 11 

Score by innings , Final 

Juniata 51101012 0—11 

L. V. C 00000024 3—9 

*Batted in 9th for Patrizio. 

Errors: Wycoff, Nye, Stewart, Har- 
ley, 2, Gracy, Snyder, Peel. 

Two base hit: Steele, LaPorte; three 
base hits, Wycoff, Daub, Hummel, 
Gracy, Snyder. Home runs: Will- 
iams. Double plays: Harley to Ander- 
son, Shortledge to Stewart, Wycoff to 
Light to Dennis. Hits off Reeder, 4 
in 2 innings; off Wood, 3 in 3 innings; 



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EDDIE EDWARDS 

TO PLAY AT PROM 



(Continued from Page 1) 



room in New York. Was the first 
American Band to play for the Prince 
of Wales. Has played for Sophie 
Tucker, Pat Roony and the famous 
Gilda Gray. 

All members in connection with the 
Prom, feel very grateful and fortu- 
nate in securing this orchestra at so 
late a date. It is hard at this time 
to secure even second-rate orchestras. 
Mr. Keats the manager of Opie Cates, 
was responsible in getting this organ- 
ization. The music is of the same 
type, so the only attraction gone will 
be the face of Opie Cates himself. 

We are sorry to make this an- 
nouncement but we feel sure that you 
will be as well satisfied with Eddie 
Edwards as you would if you heard 
Opie Cates. 



off Daub, 3 in 3 innigs; off Snyder, 8 
in 8 innings; off Fracker, 2 in 1-3 in- 
ning; off Blough, 2 in 2-3 innings. 
Winning pitcher, Snyder. Losing 
pitcher, Reeder. Time of game, 2:15. 



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WE CAN WIN 
IN BASEBALL! 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



MAY DAY WAS 
A SUCCESS! 



yOLUME VIII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 1931. 



NO. 9 



Slay Day Colorful Pageant "From English Story Book" 



ALMA BINNER 
CROWNED QUEEN 

PICTURESQUE MAY DAY 
PRESENTED BY Y.M. 
AND Y. W. 



W.S.C.A. BOARD ELECTIONS 
HELD MONDAY P. M. 



On Saturday, May 9, at 2:00 P. M. 
Lebanon Valley held its annual May 
Day celebration under the auspices of 
the Y.M. and Y.W.C.A. of the college. 
Appropriately one thousand visitors, 
relatives and friends of the students, 
witnessed the fete this year, and pro- 
claimed it the best ever presented on 
Lebanon Valley campus. 

The theme of the program was tak- 
en "From an English Story Book." 
It was divided into three episodes, of 
which the first was called "May 
Morn." The maidens of a small Eng- 
lish village were going to the woods 
to gather May flowers. But first they 
ran to the village square where they 
danced. 

The next episode was entitled "Re- 
turning to 'The Green'." The maidens 
arrived at the woods, only to find that 
many people had come before them. 
After choosing the fairest as Queer 
of the May, the "Mayers" proceeded 
to the Village Green to celebrate the 
day, accompanied by the music of an 
orchestra. First came the heralds, — 
Robin Hood and his band, — in suits 
of green, proclaiming the Queen and 
her court. Then came the Queen her 
self, preceded by her flower girls and 
followed by her train bearers. Next 
walked her Maid of Honor, and then 
followed in succession the ladies of 
the court, the village « children, the 
bearers of gifts, the court jester, and 
finally the villagers. 

Episode III, entitled "Frolic on 'The 
Green'," opened with the crowning of 
the Queen in her lovely latticed bow 
er, surrounded by her court. Then the 
gift-bearers, — the presidents of the 
four college classes, — presented her 
Continued on Page 4) 



An association meeting was held in 
North Hall parlor on Monday, May 
11, for the purpose of eecting the 
members of the Woman's Student 
Government Board for the ensuing 
year. The following members were 
elected: 

Seniors: Dorothy Garber, Anne 
Kiehl, Mary Buftington, Elizabeth 
Flook. 

Juniors: Mildred Christianson, Mar- 
ion May. 

Sophomore: Margaret Longenecker. 
Day Student: Margaret Paris. 
A non-voting member from the 
Freshman class will be selected next 
year. 

Caroline Fisher, retiring president, 
and this year's board, have had a suc- 
cessful regime, due to the hearty co- 
operation of the girls. 

The new board has not yet elected 
officers. 



OFFICERS ELECTED 

IN READERS CLUB 



The Readers Club held its final 
Meeting in North Hall parlor on Mon- 
day, May 11, 1931. The purpose of 
the meeting was to elect officers for 
the coming year and also to plan the 
w ork for the coming year. The re- 
mits of the election are Miss Ruth 
Shroyer, president, Miss Gladys Her- 
s hey, vice-president, and Mr. Edward 
Shellenberger, treasurer and secre 
tary. 

The club plans a much bigger year. 
*hey "have decided to study modern 
an d contemporary authors and their 
w °rks. They plan to attend more 
theatrical affairs and add more books 
to their shelf in the Library. 

The club has been under the guid- 
ance of Dr. P. A. Wallace since its 
Winning. He has led them through 
the 'r many difficulties. The club 
^ ls hes to thank him for the use of 
his books and his home for their meet- 
' n °"s this last season. He has given 
hel Pful advice to them in all their 



L Y. C. WINS 

JN TENNIS 

ELIZABETHTOWN LOSES 
AGAIN TO OUR 
TEAM 



DOROTHY GARBER 
W.S.G.AJPRESIDENT 

BUFFINGTON, FLOOK AND 
MAY HOLD OTHER 
OFFICERS 



At a short meeting of the newly- 
elected W.S.G.A. Board, the members 
conferred one of the highest honors 
of the college upon Dorothy Garber 
in electing her president of the "jig- 
ger-board." This will be Miss Gar 
ber's second year as representative of 
the women students, having been sec- 
retary of the association for the past 
year. She will, no doubt, be a most 
capable executive to carry on the 
runs of government such as is neces 
sary in such a position. Her duties 
will commence immediately. 

As right-hand man, Miss Garber 
will have a most able assistant in 
Elizabeth Flook s vice-president. Miss 
Flook has been representative of her 
class her freshman year. Marian May 
will assume the duties of secretary 
while Miss Buffington will have charge 
of the treasurer's accounts. 

With such officers to lead the or 
ganization for the next school year, 
success is evident. 



MEN'S SENATE ELECTIONS 
HELD ON TUESDAY 



y successful affairs. 



ANTI-TOXIN PROCESSES 
EXPLAINED TO BIOLOGISTS 



At a meeting of the Men's Senate 
the members of the board were elected 
for the next year. As yet the officers 
have not been voted upon. The follow- 
ing is the list of the members for 
the next year. 

SENIORS 
Dormitory: Kleinfelter, Kinney, 
Nye, Monteith, Stewart. 
Day: Conrad. 

JUNIORS 
Dormitory: Dellinger, Krumbeigel, 
Wood, Ulrich. 
Day — Saylor. 

SOPHOMORES 
Dormitory: Essick, Sprenkle. 
Day: Derickson. 



The Lebanon Valley tennis team 
journeyed to Elizabethtown last Wed- 
nesday and won their second victory 
over the Elizabethtown College team 
by a score of 6-0. 

The victory was the second for 
the home team in four starts. They 
lost to IF. and M. and St. Joseph's ear- 
lier in the season but now due to reg- 
ular practice the team is showing bet- 
ter form than they did in the previ- 
ous contests. All of the matches with 
the exception of the first doubles, 
were won by straight sets. Donmoyer 
and Hutchinson were forced to the 
limit after losing to Kaylor and 
Crouthermal 4-6 in the first set — they 
took the next two 7-5 and 6-3. 

Donmoyer had little trouble with 
Kaylor and won his sets 6-3, 6-2. Kay- 
lor played second man during the 
earlier part of the Elizabethtown sea- 
son but due to recent improvement he 
has displaced Crouthermal. 

Hutchinson defeated Crouthermal by 
the most decisive scores of the day — 
6-1, 6-0. This match was too one sided 
to hold the interest of the spectators 
who battled the high winds to witness 
the fracas. 

Rank defeated Fridy 6-3, 6-0, and 
Filler disposed of Lasier 6-3, 6-2. Fri- 
dy was a new addition to the Eliza- 
bethtown aggregation playing in the 
place of Deiter. 

Rank and Miller paired off in dou- 
bles against Deiter and Lauer and 
won in straight sets 6-2, 6-4. This 
doubles team seems to give the oppo- 
sition plenty of trouble — they have 
lost only one match this season and 
that was by a close score at F. and 
M. when L.V.C. won three singles 
and dropped all the doubles to the 
Lancaster boys. 

Bonebrake again cancelled their 
match so the next home game will 
be on the 15th with Juniata. Susque- 
hanna invades the campus on the fol- 
lowing day, Saturday — the match will 
be played before the baseball game 
with the same institution. 

If the weather permits the team 
journeys to Albright Wednesday the 
13th. The Reading lads have failed to 
offer much opposition during the last 
few years but rumors have been pass- 
(ontinued on Page 3) 



On Tuesday, May 12, a section of 
the Biology 18 class went to Marietta 
to see the Gilliland Laboratories, 
ihis visit is made annually by the 
students enrolled in this course, and 
has proved to be highly instructive to 
all. 

Guides showed the class the im- 
portant processes which take place in 
the manufacturing of anti-toxin for 
medical purposes. Some places of es- 
pecial interest were the refrigerator 
room where sterile vaccine is stored, 
the packing room, and the room where 
Alteration takes place. Rabbits, gui- 
nea pigs, and horses were shown in 
various stages of treatment. The 
diphtheria and rabies laboratories 
were explained in detail. 

The class is greatly indebted to Pro- 
fessor Light for arranging the trip, 
and to all who loaned cars for trans- 
portation. . 



L. Y. C. TROUNCES 
URSINUS 

FEEDER ON MOUND AL- 
LOWS SIX HITS NINE 
STRIKE-OUTS 



STEWART LEADS 

PROMENADE 

PROM COLORFUL AFFAIR 
EDDIE EDWARDS BAND 
FURNISHES MUSIC 



CORRECTION ON TENNIS 
MATCH WITH ST. JOSEPH'S 



The "La Vie" wishes to make a 
correction concerning the tennis game 
with St. Joseph's, the account of 
which occurred in last week's issue of 
the paper. The match was between 
Lebanon Valley and St. Joseph's of 
Overbrook, and not with St. John's of 
Meadowbrook as stated. The "LaVie" 
is very sorry that this mistake was 
overlooked before the printing of the 
paper. 



It is evening. Cars glide toward 
Hershey Park. Couples arrive. There 
is soft low music in the distance. All 
is reality. Women in gorgeous eve- 
ning clothes, men in refreshing flan- 
els. There are cheery salutations. 
More and more arrive. The ballroom 
is immense. Everyone is smiling 
wry smiles, knowing smiles, innocent 
smiles. Groups pass before the re 
ceiving line willingly, reluctantly. The 
orchestra is playing. They start danc- 
ing — some with ease and assurance, 
others with apprehension. It is the 
first Junior Promenade since the 
founding of the College sixty-five 
years ago. 

The evening advances. Programs 
have been filled. The hours tick away 
The promenade. Bob Stewart is an 
nounced as leader. Applause and con- 
gratulations. The couples march in 
two's. The line is over two hundred 
yards Ion;;. They pass in fours, in 
eights, sixteens, thirty-twos — all is 
confusion. A^ain they dance. The band 
plays shorter numbers. The Prome 
nade hns taken too much time. All 
the dances cannot be had. Some grit- 
ting of teeth, but the majority are 
ti~ed and happy. An impersonation by 
a member of the orchestra. Smiles 
and more dancing. A camera is on 
the platform— fin shlight pictures are 
taken. More dancing. Soft drinks are 
available. Intermission. Couples wan- 
der about. It is cool in the open air 
They return refreshed. Tony Reeder 
is trying to find somebody or being 
sought bv somebody. More flashlight 
pictures. It is twelve o'clock. The or- 
chestra breaks into "Good Night Lad 
(Continued on Page 3) 



The Lebanon Valley College nine 
won its first game of the season by 
severely trimming the Ursinus out- 
fit 7-2, climaxing the events of May 
Day in a most successful way. 

Reeder on the mound gained sweet 
revenge for the 11 inning defeat 
handed him by the Ursinus outfit a 
week or so ago. He held the visitors 
to 6 well scattered hits, issued only one 
charity base and struck out nine — a 
performance that deserves commenda- 
tion in college baseball circles. 

Scholl the first man up for Ursinus 
was retired via three swing route. 
Coble hit to short and Lodge flied 
to Dennis. Lebanon Valley came to 
bat and the side was not retired until 
eight men had batted and four runs 
had crossed the precious platter. Kar- 
pian walked Patrizio. Shortledge was 
safe on an error. Patrizio taking third. 
Wycoff then hit to second and Patri- 
zio was out at the plate. Light hit 
a long fly to right field for the sec- 
ond out. Williams then hit to left cen- 
ter scoring Shortledge and Wycoff. 
Stewart followed with another single 
sending Williams to third — and he 
took second on the throw in. Reeder 
helped his own game along by crash- 
ing a hot single to center scoring 
Williams and Stewart. Dennis flied 
out to the catcher to end the fracas. 

Ursinus was retired with a counter 
n the second. Eachus hit to center but 
was on the dubb end of a fielders 
choice. L. V. C. not satisfied with a 
four-run lead came to bat and scored 
two more runs. Murphy first up struck 
out. Patrizio walked for the second 
time. Shortledge flied out to left field 
but Wycoff was safe on an error at 
(Continued on Page 3) 



FIRST SPRING RECITAL 
DELIGHTS MUSIC LOVERS 



A recital by several of the advanced 
music students was held Monday, 
May 11, at 8 P. M. in Engle Hall. The 
participants were Miss Dorothy Hal- 
deman, piano; Miss Margaret Young, 
soprano; Mr. Harvey Horn, tenor; 
and Mr. Newton Burgner, organ. The 
accompanists for the vocal solos were 
Miss Dorothy Haldeman and Mr. 
Theodore Walker: The rendition of 
each number was highly commendable. 
Miss Hademan's piano solos surpass- 
ed even her former performances, 
while Miss Young's sweet voice, as 
usual, delighted her audience great- 
ly. Although Mr. Horn's numbers 
had been witnessed by the college au- 
dience before, they were no less an- 
preciated than before. Mr. Burner's 
organ numbers were performed in an 
excellent manner. The music lovers 
of the campus are looking forward 
eagerly for the remaining spring re- 
citals. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 1931, 



JTa Hie (&alk$imm 

ESTABLISHED 1925 

.4. weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL. STAFF 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 Editor-in-Chief 

Fred Mund, '32 Associate Editor 

Hilda D. Buckley, '32. .Associate Editor 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32 

Associate Editor 
Walter Krumbiegel, '33, 

Managing Editor 

REPORTOR1AL STAFF 
Elizabeth Ulrich, '32 
Edward Shellenberger, '33 
Edmund Umberger, '34..CJen'l Reportei 
Dorothy Garber, '32. . . . General Reporter 

George Snowhill, '34 Conservatory 

Percy Clements, '33 Athletics 

Jane Muth, '33 Clionian 

Arline Heckrote, '33 Delphian 

Clarence Earley, '33 Kalozetean 

Chester Goodman, '33 Philokosmian 

Gloria Lavanture, '33.. Alumni Reportei 

BUSINESS STAFF 
Robert Rawhouser, '32, 

Business Managei 

Herman Mariano, '33, 

Ass't Business Managei 
Paul Kleinfelter, '32, 

Circulation Managei 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



GLEANINGS 



There never was a human machine 
brought into the world durable en- 
ough to get along without the lubri- 
cation of a laugh 

— James J. Walker. 



Man is like a tack — useful if he 
has a good head and is pointed in the 
right direction — but even though he 
is driven he can only go as far as his 
head will let him. 

— The Kodak Magazine 



As to assumption that our college 
boys are on the whole serious in pur- 
pose and anxious to make the most of 
themselves, my own experience may 
be narrow and misleading, but such 
as it is it leads to the overwhelming 
conviction that the large majority of 
college boys are fully as anxious to 
use their time and opportunity wisely 
as their elders are to have them. They 
may differ as to ways and means but 
they are not trying to fool anybody. 
The man who loudly proclaims that 
college students today are not inter- 
ested in learning anything is general- 
izing quite inaccurately from a rela- 
tively small group of noise-makers to 
the whole body of American colleges. 
— Dean Hawkes, Columbia University. 



FACULTY NOTES 



Dr. O. Edgar Reynolds attended the 
fourteenth annual meeting of the 
American Council on Education, in 
the building of the National Academy 
of Sciences at Washington, D.C., May 
8-9. 



Dr. Butterwick spent several days 
last week at Bonebrake Seminary at 
Dayton, Ohio. He attended the com- 
mencement exercises on Tuesday eve- 
ning. He also attended a meeting of 
the Board of Home Missions to elect 
a successor to Dr. P. M. Camp who 
died several weeks ago. 



The faculty and student body wish 
to express their most sincere sym- 
pathy to Mrs. S. Huber Heintzelman 
and family on the death of Mr. Heintz- 
elman. 

Mr. Heintzelman died Sunday af- 
ternoon of typhoid fever, at his home 
in Chambersburg, Pa. 

He graduated in the class of 1916. 



RESOLUTIONS 

In view of the fact that the suc- 
cess of the Y.M.C.A. Cabinet 
Training Conference which was 
held at Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pennsylvania, on April 
23, 24, 25 and 26, 1931 has been 
greatly aided by a number of fac- 
tors among which are the homes 
in Annville in which students were 
entertained, the hospitality of the 
College, the College paper, "La Vie 
Collegienne, the Glee Club of the 
College, the Ladies of the United 
Brethren Church, the Faculty of 
Lebanon Valley ollege and other 
groups: 

Therefore, be it resolved, that we, 
the members of the Resolutions 
Committee, in behalf of the Con- 
ference, take this means of expres- 
sing our appreciation anl thanks 
to the following: 

1. To those families who so 
kindly opened their homes for 
the entertainment of confer- 
ence delegates. 

2. To President George D. Gos- 
sard and his faculty who ex- 
tended to the conference dele- 
gates the facilities of the col- 
lege, including the Confer- 
ence Banquet which was held 
on Saturday evening hi the 
College dining room. 

2. To the college paper, LaVie 
Collegienne, for the generous 
space devoted to the program 
of the conference. 

4. To the College Glee Club for 
the enjoyable music furnish- 
ed during the Conference 
Banquet. 

5. To the membei's of the Leb- 
anon Valley College Y.M.C.A. 
for their tireless efforts in en- 
tertaining the conference and 
making all local arrange 
ments for delegates. 

6. To the ladies of the United 
Brethren Church for their ef- 
ficient services in preparing 
and serving to the delegates 
the bounteous meals. 

7. To the members and pastor of 
the United Brethren Church 
at Annville for their generous 
action in making available to 
the conference the beautiful 
church which cotributed so 
much to the success of the 
conference. 

8. To the Literary Societies at 
Lebanon Valley College for 
their generous permission in 
allowing the conference to use 
their literary halls. 

And be it further resolved that a 
•opy of these minutes be sent to 
each of the above and be printed 
in the local papers. 

Respectfully submitted 



Y. W. C. A. NOTES 



The topic used in the Y. W. C. A. 
friendly hour on Sunday evening was 
that of "Mother." After a few pre- 
liminary remarks, Henrietta Wagner 
read a poem, ''Mother," by Edgar 
Guest. Flora Grimm read as the 
Scripture lesson Ruth 1:11-1, which 
was followed by prayer, led by Naomi 
Shivey. A story, "The Crystal 
Stream by Eulalia Proctor was then 
given by Lenna Bender. The closing 
number was a poem, "Mother of Lin- 
coln" read by Marion Kruger. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



The fact that May Day was post- 
poned a week, not as many of our 
Alumni were able to be present at 
our May Day festivities. 

Among those who were here were: 
Mr. and Mrs. David Fink '17, Mrs. 
Gordon Starr '26, Mrs. Richard Grand 
'25, Promelia Rose '26, Hilda Hess 
'30, Marion Hoffman '29, Mary Cly- 



mer '29, Warren Burtner '30, Doro- 
thy Boyer '30, Lolyd Weber '30, Paul 
Barnhart '30, Josephine Yoke '30, Jan- 
et Miller '29, Gladys Knaub '30, Jack 
Beattie '29, and Williams Myers '30. 



Things I Never Noticed Until Now! 



The many bridge players in North 
Hall . . I bet those co-els could teach 
Milton Work some pointers . . The 
Seniors with worried looks on their 
faces . . It must be over the unemploy- 
ment situation . . The crowd that at- 
tended May Day . . How silly people 
can act when they get dressed up in 
fancy clothes . . The sigh of relief 
from Miss Feneil when the final dance 
groups took their bow before the 
Queen of May . . one of the best books 
we've read this season is "Red Snow" 
. . its worth your time to read this 
little novel . . the way letters can pile 
up on your desk if you don't reply 
at once . . The Sophomores with heads 
buried in "St. Ives" . . The artistic 
pictures in several of the boys rooms 
. . The moon rising over the library, 
between the trees . . Friends in New 
York insist that you visit them this 
close to exams . . The co-eds on the 
campus that reminded you of Delmars 
"Bad Girl" . . The usual "hang-overs" 
that resulted from the Prom . . The 
poise and elegance that the gentlemen 
portrayed at the Prom . . The deter- 
mination of some of our leading men 
shown in learning to "hoof" for the 
dance . . one of the worst pictures 
we've seen in many a moon was "A 
Tailor Made Man" . . The muddled 
look on the faces of the 1933 "Quit- 
tie" staff . . they are just realizing 
what they are facing . . 



FROSH THOUGHTS 



Under the heading of "Frosh 
Thoughts" several excellent poems 
were published in last week's issue 
of the "La Vie." Unfortunately, due 
to an error, the first two poems print- 
ed were so set up that the second 
seemed to be a continuation of the 
first, greatly undermining the value 
of both works, and each was particu 
larly excellent. This week we are 
reprinting both selections in order 
that they might be appreciated to the 
fullest extent. Our deepest apologies 
ire extended to Miss Mary F. Wal 
lace, who allowed us the liberty of 
using them and to the two students 
whose contributions they were: 



A-l SKIL. 
WORKS WONDERS 



BEFORE 




ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 



207 W. Main 



When You Leave College . . 
We Suggest You Take Along 

"Baptiste Laroque" 
Legends of French Canada 
by 

Paul A. W. Wallace. 
The Price - - $1.50 
The Place 

K. S. BOLLMAN 
Bookseller & Stationer 
33 South Eighth Street 
Lebanon, Penna. 

BOLLMAN'S 

33 South Eighth Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Sometimes between long shadows on 

the grass, 
The little waves of sunlight pass. 
My eyes grow dim with tenderness, 

the while; 
Thinking I see thee, — thinking I see 

thee smile. 
And sometimes in the twilight gloom 

apart; 

The tall trees whisper, whisper, heart 
to heart. 

From my fond lips the eager an- 
swers fall, 
Thinking I hear thee, — thinking I 
hear thee call. 

RHAPSODY IN BLUE 

Eyes of blue, 

Float before my eyes 
Skies of blue, 

Through which a robin flies. 
Thoughts of blue, 

Remembering the past 
Thoughts of you. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Thursday, Fay 14—8:00 P.M., Spri ng 
recital, Conservatory of Music. 
Friday, May 15—2:30 P.M., Tennis 
match, L. V vs. Juniata (here). 
Saturday, May 16 — Baseball, L. V. vs 
Susquehanna (home). 

— Tennis match, L.V. vs. Susque- 
hanna. 

Sunday, May 17—5:30 P.M., Y.W.C.A. 
Friendly Hour. 

—5:45 P. M., Y.M.C.A. Discussion. 
Tuesday, May 19 — Tennis match, L.V. 

vs. St. Joseph (away). 

— 8:00 P. M., Spring recital, Conser- 
vatory of Music. 
Wednesday, May 20 — Tennis match. 

L.V. vs. Moravian (away). 

— Baseball, L.V. vs. Penn Military 
College (away). 



LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade. '03. 

Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



ISN'T IT 

TIME 
YOU • • • 



TELEPHONED 

^Mother and Dad 

? 




COLD, GRAY INK 

can never give them 

this Thrill! 

There's all the difference in the world 
between the cold, gray words you 
write and the warm words tliey hear. 

There's a thrill in a telephone chat 
with mother and dad ! It's next best 
to actually seeing them. 

Make a date to call them up on a 
certain day and at a certain hour 
each week. 

The cost is small— the charges can be 
reversed if you wish. 




SI 
I 

L( 

Ai 

j?i 

Ai 

Bi 

Ai 

Ai 

W 

Fi 

I, 

Di 

Ai 
H< 
I'n 
M; 
1 1 

Bu 
It 
I 1 



ar< 
arc 
dir 

Ful 

rib 

of 

div 

An 

nai 

bov 

but 

wo 

Gh 

anc 

fits 

oln 

tak 

-I 

are 

wr< 

the 

FUi 

aro 

stit 

pas 

wh< 

nov 

-T 

wes 

the 

Par 

day 

the 

er ] 

was 

van 

smc 

der 

becj 

in t 

Poet 

A 
'twi 
Tha 
holl 
tion 
Ro. 
My 
b ye! 



h 
the 
Past 
Hie t 

Slo 



/ 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 1931. 



PAGE THREE 




Spring, beautiful spring, is here ! 
Inspired by the call of the season ye 
column writer waxes poetical. The 
re sult — well, it can be called terrible. 
Judge for yourself. 
There was a young freshman from 
Ember 

Who came to the "U" in September 
Her hair was afluff 
That girl knew her stuff — 

She married the prof in December. 



I fear that I shall never lay 
L w the lovely mark of "A". 
An "A" that will not get disease 
j?rom keeping company with "E's." 
An "A" that shouts that I am wise 
Because it pays to advertise; 
An "A" that irons out all ills, 
And pleases Pa who pays the bills; 
Whose acquisition leaves me time, 
Freedom to write this rhyme. 
I, fool, will get my "E" today, 
Cut only grinds can make an "A." 



An enticing gal is Mary Blank; 
Her pa's got dough in the bank! 
I'm very much a modern miss 
My eyes are open when I kiss! 
I used to close them, oh, so tight, 
But now I let them see the light. 
It may not be so modest, but 
I like to see if his are shut. 



After all, you know the best jokes 
are not printed. They are running 
around in the Freshman Class — The 
dining hall is known by the butter 
substitute it serves — Petting is ter- 
rible, but a society pin over the heart 
of a co-ed elevates it to love, which is 
divine — The list of those who rule 
America is incomplete without the 
names of ten ton truck drivers — I 
bought an apple for the unemployed, 
but, as soon as I ate it, it began to 
work — Is a sleeping bag a knapsack — 
Give a man too many Christmas ties 
and he will hang himself — If the tux 
fits, borrow it — They just released the 
olive song "Olive you so much" — It 
takes the manicurist to nail her man 
—Love sinks in a rumble seat — Many 
are called, but most of them are 
wrong numbers — And did you hear of 
the girl who collected pistols and 
runs because she liked to have arms 
around all the time — College is an in- 
stitution of higher yearning — Manv a 
passing fancy is pretty plain — Girls 
who used to lift their head in pride 
now lift them in expectation of a kiss 
—■The college man soon learns that 
wearing letters is snfer than writing 
them — Man pursues, woman sues — 
Familiarity breeds comment — The 
days are longer in summer because 
the heat expands them — A pawnbrok- 
er lives on the flat of the land — She 
w ^s a sight even though she used 
vanishing cream — The way to stop 
smoking is to get a job in a gunpow 
der factory — A barber isn't a snob 
because he cuts an acquaintance — And 
ln the midst of all this I have another 
Poetical inspiration. 



Alas, a n t i alack, I much fear we 
twill have to wait until another day 
That man from Germany just came in 
hollering for copy, and the inspira- 
tion went where all such things should 
Ro. Figure it out for yourself. I can't 

My typewriter won't stand it. Goom- 
hye! 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



*n the stages of recuperation due to 
he ferocity in which I celebrated the 
j* ast week-end, it is extremely hard for 

e to get any action from the Anterior 
^ a tomy, but while the murky, rainy 

m osphere seems to cast a shadow of 

°om over the Campus. I am in the 



opposite mood. No, the monthly check 
did not come! The outcome of last 
weeks baseball game has not much to 
do with my mirth. The success of the 
Junior Prom, adds little. The whole 
cause is that MAY DAY IS OVER! 

I was alright until it came time to 
perform. The vastness of the populace 
did not bother me. The garb did not 
effect me in the least. Even the "hoot- 
ing" of the rabble did not un-nerve 
me. It was pure psychology J When I 
"fell in" to begin that sow match out 
to the arena I began to get all "goose 
fleshy." I even got so frustrated that 
I turned to my partner and said, "It 
won't be long now, Warden." The 
next thing I remember was that it 
was over. If asked next year, I shall 
boldly and braggadociously accept 
without further ado. It isn't bad! I can 
at least practice for a wedding march 
regardless if it actually never hap- 
pens! I may find someone yet who is 
easily fooled or imbued with a bold 
gambling spirit. 

At this time I want to heartily 
thnnk all people who were in the 
least way responsible for the Junior 
Prom. It wasn't a "howling" success 
but due to things that were unavoid- 
able the patrons generously over- 
looked any errors. In behalf of the 
Junior Class this request has come 
to me. I am not very apt in speech- 
making or using "flowery" phrases, 
but from the bottom of my heart I 
only sav in a stupid, boorish way, 
THANKS. 

It won't be long now until "those 
embarrassing moments" are again up- 
on us! Examinations! The nemesis of 
scholars, students, "dead-timber" 
lame-ducks and all people who pay 
tuition! Comes now the time when 
you are supposed to put a years learn- 
ing down on a piece of paper in sixty 
hurried miutes. Cram the night be- 
fore. Get up with your head clear as 
the Missouri River. Dash down a 
'scups Koffee," and "gedunk" a big 
"sinker" that couldn't be digested by 
a Wart-hog. Tear to the "torture 
chamber." Take a last fond look at 
what you think you will be asked to 
write on. Start writing — crib a little 
— tell your neighbor to learn to write 
legibly — put down what you think — 
erase and put down the opposite (in 
a majority of cases this tip is right) 
hand your paper in and then begin 
to worry about the next one. Remem- 
ber you can only fluk as many hours 
as you are taking (unlesc you are 
over-cut in chapel). 

I promised someone who is blue thit 
I would pen some poetry fitting to the 
case. However, "little optimist" you 
have asked for it and here it is: 

1 

No one can tell you what to do. 
No one told me. I can't tell you. 
Kiss if you must. Kiss if you kill 
Let him be starved or drink his fill 
No woman knows which wav will gftt 
The best results. What captures one 
man, 

Rends another on the run. 

Nor will you know what you have lost 



In conquering. Success may cost 
A more spectacular success, 
A choicer brand of happiness 
Always the bitter with the sweet, 
So if you can't enjoy defeat, 
Better give up the merry chase 
And spend your time crocheting lace. 

/ 

I think with that I had better quit 
before they have to sterilize each 
copy of the paper. So until next week, 
So long and may all your checks be 
big ones! 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



L. V. C. TROUNCES 

U R S I NU S 



(Continued from Page 1) 



first. Light then lnced a hot liner to 
right field scoring Patrizio. Williams 
then came through for his second hit 
in as many attempts and Wycoff 
crossed the platter. 

There was no more scoring until thr 
8th frame. Reeder kept his hits well 
scattered and Hunter pitching in 
place of Karjinan for Ursinus was 
very effective, striking out four men 
in 6 innings. Three of these came in 
the third and fourth. The eighth 
frame was by far the visitors best 
display of strength at the bat. Hun- 
ter started off by swinging futily 
three times. Scholl then crashed a hot 
doubel to center field. Coble was safe 
on an error taking second. Todge 
struck out but Sterner poked a nice 
single into left center scoring the two 
men on base. Bateman missed the 
third swing to retire the side. 

Lebanon Valley must have been 
peeved by this sudden uprising came 
to bat in their half of the eighth and 
scored a well earned run. Williams 
first man up. doubled to left field and 
Reeder rushed him home with a sharp 
single to center. Dennis and Murphy 
went out in order. 

Ursinus came to bat in the 9th and 
the first two men up got hits but 
Reeder tightened down and prevented 
a score. He fanned Hunter, forced 
Scholl to pop up and Coble hit to 
Wycoff to end the game. 

Reeder deserves plenty of credit for 
his well timed twirling. He had the 
visiting team at his mercy during the 
first seven innings, and weakened only 
oce allowig two hits in the same in- 
ning. Williams led the batters for the 
day with three hits out of four trips 
to the plate, batting in four runs and 
scoring twice himeslf. Reeder also 
had his eye on the ball — he crashed 
out two nice singles to bat in two 
runs. 

The next game is with Dickinson at 
Carlisle, and then the team comef 
home again Saturday to tangle with 
Susouehanna University — this is the 
last home game until the Albright tilt 
on June 9th so the full cooperation 



Sandwiches Sodas 

EAT AT ROEMIG'S 

DELICIOUS HOME MADE 

ICE CREAM 
Cigars Cigarettes 



GET OUR RATES ON SPECIAL BANQUETS 
AND DINNERS 

The Pennway 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY* DAILY 



and support of all the student body is 
desired to make it a real success. 
Box score: 





URSINUS 








AB. 


K. 


H.PO.A. 


Scholl 3b 


5 


1 


1 1 


Coble, ss 


5 


1 


12 


Lodge, If 


4 





2 


Sterner, 2b . 


4 





2 3 2 


Eaches cf . 


4 





12 


Bateman, rf . 


4 





2 


Dennis, lb 


3 





16 


Seeger, lb . 


1 





10 


Yeckley, c . 


4 





7 


Karzinon, p 











Hunter, p . . 


4 





11 



Totals 



L. V. C. 



.38 2 6 24 6 



AB.R. H.PO.A. 

ratrizio, If 2 10 11 

Shortledge, cf 4 10 

Wycoff, 2b 4 2 3 3 

Light, ss 4 112 

Williams, rf 4 2 3 

Stewart, 3b 4 1114 

lleeder, p 4 2 3 

Donnis, lb 4 12 

Murphy, c 4 19 1 



Totals 34 7 8 27 14 

Score by innings: 

Urrinus 000000021 

L. V. C 42008001x 

Errors: Dennis (Ursinus) Murphy, 
Light 2, Wykoff. 

Runs batted in: Williams 4, Reeder 
2 Light. Two base hits: Williams, 
Scholl, Coble. Double plays: Patrizio 
to Wycoff. Base on balls, off Reeder 1, 
off Karizhan 2. off Hunter 1. Hits 
off Karziman 4 in two innings; off 
Hunter 4 in 6 innigs. Winning pitcher, 
Reeder. Losing pitcher, Karzinan. 
Time of game 1:56. Umpire, Galla- 
gher. Scorer, Fishburne. 



Williams and Reeder are leading 
the sluggers at present time with Wy- 
coff, Daub, Stewart and Light com- 
ing next in line. 

The averages thus far are: 

Williams 2 8 5 .625 

Reeder 3 10 4 .400 

Wycoff 3 12 4 .333 

Stewart 3 14 4 .286 

Light 3 14 4 .28(5 

Daub 2 8 2 .250 

Shortledge 3 13 3 .231 

Patrizio 3 10 2 .200 



THIS TS A OUAT TTY SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

Service, Wnrkm?in«h ; p and Material? 
Hand Stitching 

W. D. ELLIOTT, JR. 

140 N. Railroad St., 
ANNVILLE. PA. 



Murphy 3 11 2 .181 

Dennis 3 13 1 .077 

Kraybill 110 .000 

Nye 110 .000 

Wood 110 .000 

Trezise 110 .000 

A resume of the batting averages 
will appear each week to give the 
players a line on how they played and 
to satisfy the curious public. 



STEWART LEADS 

PROMENADE 



(Continued from Page 1) 



ies" then "Home Sweet Home." The 
Promenade is over. 

All in all it was, as the first dance 
of its kind, a success. One must al- 
ways keep in mind the handicaps un- 
der which the committee labored. It 
was a gigantic undertaking and it was 
certainly well handled. 

Due to a misunderstanding on 
someone's part, Opie Cates did not 
play as had been previously announc- 
ed. Nevertheless Eddie Edwards filled 
the bill rather favorably. 

The hostesses present were: Mrs. 
Green, Mrs. Bender, Miss Lietzau, 
Mrs. Saylor, Mrs. Wallace, Mrs. 
Reynolds, Miss Johnson, Mrs. Engle. 

The Prom. Committee were: Arthur 
Reeder, chairman; Eva Peck, Cynthia 
Benzing, Elijah Balsbaugh, James 
Frevola. 



L. V. C. WINS IN TENNIS 



(Continued from Page 1) 



ed around that they have a much 
stronger team this year. We're look- 
ing forward to this victory as much 
as we do for any of the major sports. 
Let's go after 'em— We'll "racket" 
the outfit even though we can't push 
a pigskin through their weighty 
bunch. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESSING 
KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 

10 W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



Everything in the Printed 
Line — 




ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 



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We Cater To Private Parties and Banquets 
Special Dinners and A La Carte Service 
Ample Parking Space We Serve With a Smile 




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Annville, Pa. 



NEW LINE OF FROCKS 
AND GOWNS 

Rose Singer Shop 



761 Cumberland Street, 



Lebanon, Pa. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 14, 1931. 



Among Our Seniors 





JOE HUTCHISON 

Joe the gallant gentleman from 
Cumberland, Pa. Joe the home town 
boy who made good. An old bromide 
but it still applies. He was born a 
number of years ago and is still alive 
and breathing hard. 

Besides being a scholar and a gen- 
tleman he is an athlete. He plays ten- 
nis. Also as a dramatist he has cre- 
ated many notable roles. His last was 
as the captain in "Androcles anl the 
Lion" the Kalo anniversary play. 

Nevertheless we cannot overlook 
Joe's greatest affliction "Ike" Grant. 
They have roomed together for four 



years and still Ike is saving money. 
All in all it looks like a losing propo- 
sition to Joe. Indeed "Ike" may be 
said to have a bad influence on Joe 
in view of the fact that "Ike" insists 
on those reading escapades. 



ETHEL MAE HOWER 

Another genius in our midst! Ethel 
gets her string of A's every semes- 
ter. Her scholastic record is one of 
which any person could feel proud 
and rightly so. She has many honors 
to her credit, . notably that of first 
prize in the Junior class of last year. 
One of her notable achievements this 



past seasoo has been that of president 
of the German Club. Taking care of 
it from its very beginning Ethel has 
made a growing and thriving organi- 
zation of it. She takes the keenest of 
pleasures in being in contact with her 
native language and her ability along 
that line cannot be questioned. 

This is Ethel's first year in the dor- 
mitory but during this brief year 
many have learned to know and real- 
ize her worth. With her sunny, smil- 
ing disposition, her qualities of lead- 
ership, her energy and determination, 
we can expect only the best from 
Ethel. 



ALMA BINNER 

CROWNED QUEEN 



(Continued from Page 1) 



with their floral tributes, and the 
frolic was ready to begin. 

The village children, with their 
bright-colored jackets and caps, be- 
gan the festivities. The May Pole 
dancers followed, — the girls attract- 
ively gowned in long organdie frocks 
of pastel shades, and the boys attired 
in white flannels and dark coats. They 
made a very pretty sight indeed, as 
they twined in and out, winding up 
the vari-colored ribbons on the pole, 
and finally ending up before the 
Queen in salute. 

Next was the Morris dance, — the 
girls in their peasant dresses and the 
boys in costumes of English villagers. 
Then followed the dance of the chim- 
ney sweeps with their ragged and 
dirty clothes, appropriate to the ur- 
chins who climb up the insides of 
sooty chimneys. 

Robin Hood and his band now pro- 
ceeded to show their skill in shoot- 
ing as well as in dancing, and to- 
gether with Maid Marion they pre- 
sented their capers for the Queen's 
approval. 

The Milk Maids with their aprons 
and pails, and the farm boys with 
their rakes and wide straw hats, fur- 
nished the next entertainment, and 
last of all came the garland girls, 
with their fluffy white dresses, chap- 
lets, and garlands of bright-colored 
spring flowers. This last dance lent 
an attractive and coloful finishing 
touch to the whole affair. 

The Queen of the May, Miss Alma 
Binner, presented a charming picture 
in her trailing gown of white and her 
crown of daisies. She carried a beauti- 
ful bouquet of cream roses ad yellow 
daises. The Maid of Honor, Miss Mary 
Stager, was attractively gowned in a 
creation of cream lace over blue, with 
a blue hat to match. She also carried a 



bouquet of roses. The ladies of die 
ccurt wore chiffon dresses of pastel 
shades and shoes of harmonizing col- 
ors. The jester, Robert Schaak, in his 
dap and bells, kept the audience in 
?n uproar by his antics and sallies in 
and out among the dancers. 

The solo dances of William Siler 
rnd Helen [Franklin as Robin Hood 
and Maid Marion were excellently in- 
terpreted and executed. 

Participants in the program besides 
those already mentioned, were: 

FLOWER GIRLS: 
Euth Light Marian Millard 

TRAIN BEARERS: 
George Wagner Richard Grimm 

LADIES Q7 THE COURT: 
Dorothy Thompson Margaret Young 
Caroline Fisher Margaret Light 

Ruth Liller Dorothy Hafer 

BEARERS OF GIFTS 
Russell Morgan, '31 

Walter Krumbeigle, '33 
Robert McCusker, '32 

Scotty Abrams, '34 
VILLAGE CHILDREN: 
John Henry Light Samuel Taylor 
Wayne Rohland Tony Wallace 

Henry Miller Earl Light 

William Shank Mark Longenecker 
David Bomberger Loster Smith 

John Nye Mary Grace Longenecker 
Georgiana Shutter Meredith Houser 
Jane Heilman Katherine Smuck 

Violet May Nagle Betty Killinger 
Elinore Anspach Dorothy Rohland 

MAY POLE DANCE 
Anne Garber James R. Monteith 
Ruth Armascot Russell Dennis 

Mary Buffmgton Marlin Balsbaugh 
Elizabeth Flook Arthur Reeder 

Mary K. Goshert Franklin Miller 
Gladys Hershey Warren Light 

Lolita Mummert Earl Frey 

Eva Peck Ray Pickel 

Mary Ann Rupp Robert Stewart 

Ruth Shroyer Paul Kleinfelter 

Hester Thompson Elias Milovich 
Henrietta Wagner Willard TVezise 
Kathryn Yingst Robert McCusker 
Mary Bixler Morton Earley 



Ann Esbenshade 
Helen Groh 
Dorothy Snyder 
Kathryn Krebes 
Margaret Paris 
Naomi Shively 



James Frevola 
Preston Kohler 
Charles Salek 
John Hughes 
John Morris 
Alvin Kinney 



MORRIS DANCE: 

Anne Gohn Percy Clements 

Jane Muth William Speg 

Miriam Owen Carroll Sprenkle 

Arline Heckrote Samuel Ulrich 

Miriam Miller David Grove 

Agnes Coleman Mitchell Jordan 
Mildred Christenson Abram Bower 

Helen Eddy William Seeger 

CHIMNEY SWEEPS 

Dwight Grove John Trego 

John Todd Joseph Rhen 

Dewitt Essick Jones Fridy 

George Klitch Kenneth Whisler 

Floyd Mantz Melvin Hitz 

Carol Long Earl Howard 

Peter Kandrat Allan Ranck 

Russell Williams Harry McFaul 



Harold Greene 



George Sherk 



i ROBIN HOOD'S BAND 

Philip Barnes Frederick Marrison 
Wiliam Barnes Rudolph Miller 



H. GOODMAN SONS 

29 W. Sheridan Ave. 

Real Refreshments in a 
Real Way 

Ice Cream, Cakes and Pies 



Grimms Book Store 



We Have an Interesting 
Circulating Library 

Read our . New Hooks at a 
Very Small Charge 

SENIORS 

Now is a good time to order 
NAME CARDS 



Calvin Heller 
Earl Frey 

MILK MAIDS and 
Gertrude Paul 
Gloria LaVanture 
Dorothy Forry 
Esther Swelser 
Gretna Drawbaugh 
Estella Wolfe 
Marion Kruger 



Lee Stone 
William Brown 

(FARM BOYS: 
Clarence Earley 
William Speg 
Robert Hughes 
Earl Hoover 
Forris Adams 
John Zech 
Lee Stone 



GARLAND GIRLS: 
Helen Lane Viola Williams 

Margaret Longenecker Mary Gossard 
Marjorie Miller Mary Margaret Brace 
Gem Gemmill Anna Matula 

Kathryn Mowery Mildred Nye 

Charlotte Weirick Marion Miller 
Haidee Blubaugh Margaret Kohler 
Minna Wolfskeil Martha Kreider 

ORCHESTRA: 
Matilda Bonanni Clinton Allen 

Regina Oyler Newton Burgher 

Christine Grubes Harry Zech 

Evangeline Salorio George Snowhill 
Henrietta Heilman Richard Slaybaugh 
Virginia Thrush Donald Shope 

Helen Eddy Leonard Schrope 

Lanis Rossini Carl Myers 

Wilbur Mathias Warren Lebo 

J 

Much of the credit for the success 
of the program goes to Miss Louise 
Fencil, who planned and directed it. 
The dances were coached by Profes- 
sor Charles Shaar of Harrisburg, Pa., 
and the orchestra was under the able 
direction of Professor Harold Malsh. 

The student committee consisted of: 

Chairman H. Marie Gelwicks 

Assoc.-Chairman Frederick Mund 

Costumes Dorothy Garber 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville - Pa. 



MENS 

Horse Hide Leather Coats, Shoes 
Underwear, Sweaters, Shirts 
and Ties. 
LADIES 
Silk Undies, Silk Hose, Strap 

Sandals, Pumps, Gloves. 
COURTESY — SERVICE 

J. F. BERLEW 

9-11 West Main Street. 
Annville, Pa. 



D. LSAYL0R & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND GOAL 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Refreshments Ruth Coble 

Decoration Mary Buffmgton 

Platform and Grounds .... John Morris 

Finance Paul Keene 

Publicity Paul Kleinfelter 

In addition, the Y.M. and Y.W.C.A. 
wish to thank the following: Profes- 
sor Stokes for aiding with the finan- 
ces of the undertaking, Miss Gillespie 
for orchestration and music, Profes- 
sor Behney, advisor of grounds com- 
mittee, Miss Firiam Oyer for her 
work in training the children for their 
dances, Miss Catherine Lutz, Miss 
Margaret Kohler and Mr. Newton 
Burgner for their work at the piano. 



LIFE-WORK RECRUITS 

ELECT OFFICERS 



The work of the Life Work Re- 
cruits was practically completed for 
the year by the election of officers on 
May 11. The following were chosen: 

President .... r _ Harry Zech' 

Vice President Lucille Engle 

Secretary Edward Shellenberger 

Treasurer Allen Ranck 

The officers are all competent and 
acquainted with the work and a suc- 
cessful year is anticipated. 



Chefs 

House of Good 
Foods 

Win. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 




Meals Served at All Hours 

Our Specialty 

BANQUETS AND PARTIES 



For Quality 

BAKED PRODUCTS 



Patronize 



FINK'S BAKERY 



Main Street 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 



Lebanon, Pa. 



Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens- 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

H ARPEL'S ]?! ££ f V?'^" , 

757-759 Cumberland Street 

Special Rate on Portraits to Students 



WE CAN WIN 
IN BASEBALL! 



laifieCoIkijieitnt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



MAY DAY WAS 
A SUCCESS! 



VOLUME VIII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 1931. 



XD. 10 



1 



■YLINHEN WIN 
SLUGFEST 17-10 

HEAVY ARTILLERY CAUSES 
BIG SCORE IN 
GAME 



KLEINFELTER ELECTED 
PRESIDENT OF SENATE 



The L. V. C. baseball team journey- 
ed to Chester Tuesday and defated 
the Pennsylvania Military College out- 
fit by a score of 17-10. The game 
was a slugfest from the very first and 
both teams were forced to use their 
reserve pitching strength. 

Shortledge of the locals starred at 
bat collecting five singles and a triple 
out of seven trips. The credit for the 
victory goes to Daub the starting hur- 
ler who was driven from the mound 
in the fourth while L.V.C. still had 
a 5-4 leod. 

Patrizio the first man up crashed a 
sizzling triple to right center and 
Shortledge connected for base-hit 
number one to send him scampering 
across the platter. The next three 
batters were retired in order. P. M. 
C.'s first man reached the initial sack 
by virtue of a walk but fell victim of 
a double play. The next batter lined 
to the third-baseman Stewart for the 
third out. 

L.V.C. again drew blood in the sec- 
ond. Stewart fanned but Daub singled 
to center. Dennis flied out to left 
field. Murphy crashed a nice double 
to deep center and Daub crossed the 
plate. Patrizio walked. Shortledge 
connetced for his second hit in as 
many innings and Murphy scored. Wy- 
coff hit to third to end the frame 
Daub had the home team at his mercy 
and the first three men to face him 
went out via infield taps. 

The third was the only inning the 
locals failed to score. P.M.C. rallied 
however and turned a walk, four hits 
and an error into four tallies. The- 
viates was safe on Stewart's babble. 
Diago singled sending him to third 
Hunsicker popped up. Kane singled 
scoring Theviates and took second on 
the throw in Yasco singled scoring 
Kane and Diego. Miller flied out but 
Warren crashed a single to left that 
scored Yasco. 

L.V.C. came to bat in the fourth and 
overhauled the lead. Daub first man 
U P singled. Dennis sacrificed him to 
second. Murphy fouled sending Daub 
home. Patrizio fanned but Shortledge 
connected for his third straight hit 
• and Murphy crossed the platter. Wy- 
c °ff again ended the play with a high 
fl y to left. P.M.C. collected two hits 
in their half of the inning but were 
unable to score. Wood went in the 
b «x for L.V.C. 

A walk, infield out and double was 
^sponsible for the locals next tally. 
Williams walked. Light went out 
third to first but Stewart doubled 
sending Williams across the plate. 
Dennis and Wood flied out in order. 

P-M.C. tallied two in the fifth to 
knot the score. Yosco walked. Miller 
Placed a nice triple in feft center 
A e ld scoring Yosco. Warren flied out 
b ut Loyer doubled to knock in Miller. 
La yer was caught at third and Bdit- 
te n fanned to end the time at bat. 

Murphy first up in the sixth crashed 
* single into center for his third hit. 
feeder batting for Wood was out 
l bird to first. Patrizio fanned. Short- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



At a reecnt meeting of the Men's 
Senate, the officers for the coming 
year were elected. The new president 
is Paul I. Kleinfelter. He has seen 
the workings of the body through two 
years of experience, and indications 
show that the coming year augurs well 
for good government. James R. Mon- 
teith, who also has had two years of 
experience in the administration of 
justice, was elected vice president. The 
secretary and treasurer if the organ- 
ization is now Woodrow S. Dellinger. 
These officers along with the other 
senators elect will be installed at the 
first general assembly of the student 
body in September. 



GOSSARDS ENTERTAIN 
SENIOR MEMBERS 



FOURTH-YEAR STUDENTS 
GIVEN BANQUET BY 
PRESIDENT AND WIFE 



NETMEN WIN 

TWO MATCHES 



TENNIS TEAM NEARS 
CLOSE OF SEASON IN 
BLAZE OF GLORY 



SECOND SPRING RECITAL 
ENJOYED BY STUDENTS 



The members of the graduating 
class of 1931 were royally entertained 
at a banquet given by Dr. and Mrs. 
G. D. Gossard, on Tuesday evening, 
May 12, 1931, at Chef's Place, east 
of Annville. Practically every mem- 
ber of the Senior Class was present 
as well as representatives from the 
faculty. 

After an address of welcome by 
President Gossard, the guests enjoy- 
ed the tasty foods prepared by Mr. 
Favinger, the college's own chef. The 
remainder of the evening was spent 
in various amusements, dancing and 
cards among the most popular. 

Although the weather outdoors was 
stormy, the spirits of the party were 
not dampened one bit, for gaiety pre- 
vailed, and on returning home at a 
late hour, the young people agreed 
that the banquet was a huge scucess. 



The L.V.C. tennis team easily de- 
feated the Juniata College outfit on 
the local courts last Friday by a 6-1 
score. 

Donmoyer, Rank, Miller and Bowers 
easily defeated their opponents in the 
single matches. Hutchinson playing 
second man suffered the only defeat 
good the majority of his shots desipte 
on his toes most of the time and made 
good the majority of ihs shots despite 
Hutchinson's careful play. 

The doubles were all won by the 
home team. Donmoyer paired with 
Hutchinson and Rank with Miller. 
The visitors had several chances in 
the opening games to crash through 
but the clever and speedy play of the 
locals tired them out and the match 
was sewed up in straight sets. 
Susquehanna 

Susquehanna fell before the Blue 
and White Saturday morning as the 
L. V. C. team won their second match 
in as many days. All of the players 
were in good shape and had little 
trouble in turning back the Selings- 
grove aggregation by a 6-1 score. 

These two matches gave the team 
good practice for their scheduled two- 
day trip this week. They tangle with 
St. Joseph's of Overbrook on Wednes- 
day and then journey to Moravian 
College at Bethlehem, for a match on 
Thursday. Reports of these matches 
had not been received when the paper 
went to press. 



THIRD MUSIC RECITAL 

WELL RECEIVED 



The second of a series of Spring re- 
citals was given Thursday evening, 
May 14, in Engle Conservatory. Those 
who helped to make this program suc- 
cessful were: Miss Helen Eddy, voice; 
Miss Dorothy Ely, piano; Miss Mil- 
dred Bomberger, voice; Miss Kathryn 
Witmer, organ; Miss Catherine Heck- 
man, pianu; and Mr. Robert Heath, 
piano. 

With the exception of Miss Eddy, 
v%hose talent the campus has enjoyed 
heretofore, the participants were un- 
uerclassmen who have appeared in 
then- first spring recital on L. V. C. 
campus. The skill which each one 
displayed augurs well for future 
spring recitals. 

We urge that the students show 
more interest and attend these con- 
certs. 



L. V. C. DEFEATS 
SUSQUEHANNA 



PATRIZIO PITCHES STERL- 
ING GAME; ALLOWS 
ONE RUN 



NATIVE ASSYRIAN 
CHAPEL SPEAKER 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Friday, May 21— Y.W.C.A. and Y.M. 

C. A. House Party starts. 
Saturday, May 21— Tennis, Dickinson, 

away. 

— Baseball, Susqucnhanna, away. 

Tuesday, May 26—3 P.M., Spring re- 
cital, Conservatory of Music. 

Wednesday, May 27—6:15 P.M., Pray 
er meeting, Philo Hall. 

Thursday, May 28—8 P.M., Spring re- 
cital, Conservatory of Music. 



The third successful spring recital 
was held Tuesday evening, May 29th 
in ngle Hall. Several of the advanced 
music students delighted the audience 
with their numbers. Miss Hester 
Thompson, in her vocal solos, lacked 
nothing in her sweet soprano tones. 
Mr. Theodore Walker played with 
great skill on the piano. Miss Margar- 
et Young enthralled the music lovers 
with her organ renditions, while Miss 
Kathryn Lutz entertained with some 
excellent piano numbers. Miss Oleta 
Deitdich favored with several violin 
selections. Following is the order of 
the program: 

Sonata Op. 31, No. 2 (First Move- 
ment) Beethoven 

Mr. Theodore Walker 

As Flows the Water Arne 

A Benediction Edwards 

Miss Hester Thompson 

Sonata in D Minor (Introduction and 

Allegro) Guilmant 

Miss Margaret Young 

Gavotte Gluck-Brahms 

Lento Cyril Scott 

Gedman Dance Beethoven 

Miss Kathryn Lutz 

Cavatina Carl Reinecke 

Air with Variation Daniels 

Oleta Deiti-ich 

Fugue n D Major Bach 

Miss Margaret Young 

Barcarolle n A Minor Rubenstein 

Polonaise MacDowell 

Mr. Theodore Walker 

The Fisher's Widow Edwards 

Jes Dreamin' of You English 

Miss Hester Thompson 

Piece Heroique Franck 

Fountain Reverie Fletcher 

First Concert Study Yon 

Miss Margaret Young 



MAKES PLEA FOR CHRIST- 
IANS IN HHE EUPHRA- 
TES VALLEY 



An unusual treat was given the stu 
dent body at Chapel on Monday, May 
18th, by one Mr. Daniel, an. Assyrian 
from Mesopotamia. He opened his talk 
by describing the religious conditions 
in the region of the Tigris and Eu 
phrates Rivers. As he outlined the sit- 
uation there are at present five relig 
ious groups in that section, namely, 
the Protestant, the Catholic, Seljuk 
Mohammedan, Mohammedan, and, 
what is known as the Followers of 
John the Baptist. However, the Mo- 
hammedans are supreme in power, 
and they use very possible means to 
suppress the other peoples. 

Being a graduate of a college in 
South Carolina, he then gave a very 
witty dissertation on his induction 
into college life. It was at this stage 
of the talk that "both faculty and 
students" were in constant par- 
oxysms of laughter. 

Having gained the interest of his 
audience, he then presented his very 
tragic picture of a down-trodden peo 
pie. It was a story of ruthless mur 
der, devestation, and ruin, which had 
coem upon his fellow-believers and im 
mediate family at the hands of the 
cruel Mohammedan. 

In closing, he told a bit of his life 
history, and made it known that he 
aspires to the Christian ministry. 
Knowing that the student body was 
very anxious to get back to the class- 
room, he brought his talk to an end 
amidst a clamorous applause. 



The Lebanon Valley College base- 
ball team won a well played game 
from the Susquehanna nine on the lo- 
cal diamond last Saturday by a 3-1 
score. It was a pitcher's duel thru- 
out with Patrizio, star southpaw of 
the locals, holding a slight edge over 
Donnel, the visiting twirler. 

The Susquehanna outfit outhit the 
home team eight to seven and each 
team had one error but L.V.C. turned 
each opportunity into a run. Will- 
iams the mainstay of the local bat 
swingers still had hi;, eye on the ap- 
ple. He connected for a three-bagger 
and single out to three trips to the 
plate— an average that any big leagu- 
er would cherish. 

The visitors failed to score in their 
two times at bat, getting only one 
hit in the second frame and two hits 
with two runs in the last half of the 
second. Stewart walked to start 
things off. Daub singled, Stewart tak- 
ing second. Patrizio then struck out. 
Murphy was safe on an error, crowd- 
ing the bags. Shortledge came to bat 
and crashed out a clean single to 
score Stewart and Daub. Wycoff 
struck out and Light hit to the pitch- 
er to end the inning. 

Susquehanna collected one hit in the 
third and two in the fourth but were 
unable to convert them into a score 
The home team scored again in the 
fifth when Williams hit what could 
have been a home run and stopped on 
^hird. He scored on Stewart's tap to 
the pitcher. 

Each side was retired in order un- 
til the lucky seventh when Susque- 
hanna turned a hit and an error into 
their lone tally. Palmer got a hit, 
stole second and scored on Stewart's 
poor throw to first that got away from 
Williams. This ended the treat to over 
take the small lead. Patrizio struck 
out the next three men in order. 

The game was one of the best play- 
ed on the local field this season look- 
ed at from the scoring angle. Each 
Continued on Page 4) 



DER DEUTSCHE VEREIN 

TAKES TO QUARRY 

On Monday evening, May 18, "Der 
Deutsche Verein" held its last social 
function of the school year. About 18 
members of the club, accompanied by 
the faculty advisor, Miss Lena Liet- 
zau, hiked to the stone uarry south 
of Annville to spend several hours en- 
joying themselves in games and songs. 

One of the main features of the eve- 
ning was a delicious lunch eaten 
around a roaring fire. Sandwiches and 
hot dogs formed the piece de resis- 
tence, while pickles, potato chips, 
bananas, cocoa and cake made up the 
remainder of the meal. 

After this, those present sang Ger- 
man songs, accompanied on the uke- 
lele by Miss Helen Eddy, and spent 
the remainder of the evening playing 
games. 

The party dispersed at 9, everv- 
body voting it a most delightful cli- 
max to the activity of the German 
Club during the year. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 21, L931 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



i. weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 Editor-in-Chief 

Fred Mund, '32 Associate Editor 

Hilda D. Buckley, '32. .Associate Editor 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32 

Associate Editor 
Walter Krumbiegel, '33, 

Managing Editor 



REFORTORIAL STAFF 

Edmund Umberger, '34. .Oen'l Reporter 



Dorothy Garber, '32. . . . General Reporter 

George Snowhill, '34 Conservator 

Percy Clements, '33 Athletics 

Jane Muth, '33 Clionian 

Arline Heckrote, '33 Delphian 

Clarence Earley, '33 Kalozetean 

Chester Goodman, '33 Philokosmian 



Gloria Lavanture, '33.. Alumni Reportei 
Edward Shellenberger, '33 



BUSINESS STAFF 
Robert Rawhouser, '32, 

Business Managei 

Herman Mariano, '33, 

Ass't Business Managei 
Paul Kleinfelter, '32, 

Circulation Managei 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under tne 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



EXAMS! 



There's not much that you can do 
about exams. They come regularly at 
the end of every year. Looking back 
on the last exam time, we shudder 
when we think of it — the sleepless 
hours of constant study, the feeling 
of uncertainty before the questions 
were handed to us, the frantic scrat- 
ching of the pen as fact after fact was 
written in the familiar blue books 
while the hands of the clock crept 
round and round. Finally the allotted 
time was at an end. The book handed 
to the instructor for better or worse 
and then the days filled with doubts 
and hopes. After a time the papers 
were returned. We had passed an- 
other exam. 

Now the time of nightmares is with 
us once more. We are amazed to see 
that the months have sped by so rap- 
idly. Anj so we begin to worry. Why, 
you ask! Because it is the thing to 
do. You have always worried before 
at exam time. In fact worry and 
exams seem to be synonomous. We 
tell our friends and our classmates 
of our innumerable tasks to be done, 
such as term papers and reports be- 
fore we will be allowed to take the 
quizzes. He who has the greatest 
number is looked! upon w ith wonder 
and astonishment, How will he ever 
accomplish everything in the short 
time? 

Exams are but ten short days 
ahead. Each day brings us nearer. 
The sign has been posted, "Stop, Look 
and Listen." Ye stop and we do look 
but do we listen ? If we really listen- 
ed we would put all worry aside (if 
possible) and honer.tly try to acquire 
some knowledge before the acid tests 
are forced upon us. 

We often wonder why we must un- 
dergo these mental tortures of test- 
ing our knowledge, for the greater 
number of students only "cram" the 
night before. After they have taken 
each subject'-, quizzing, they imme- 
diately forget what they have studied. 
But is this true ? Would it be possible 
for us to attend classes in a said sub- 
ject for one semester without absorb- 
ing some information. And if exams 
were not given, lnw v ould we be 
judged, how would \ e reecive recognii 
tion fcr cur work ? Exams then are a 
means to an end. We must admit that 



we do study with exams in mind. They 
are necessary. 

So, if exams we must have and as 
they do come upon us at this beauti- 
ful time of the year, let's accept them 
for what they are. Do not dwell up- 
on the physical discomforts we en- 
due while studying for them but 
think of our minds being stimulated 
by these mental gymnastics. Remem- 
ber we get from a thing exactly what 
we put into it. We will be surprised 
at what we know and what we do not 
know. They are an awakening! Come 
on, ye (jormants! 



WHAT— AGAIN? 



Well its a dead cinch that you won't 
throw garbage around in a few years, 

hen why do it now. The front of the 
men's dorm looks like a dump during 
x spring house-cleaning season. And 
as for the offense arising therefrom- — 
well the only rival is the chem. lab 

uring the progress of a certain ex- 
periment. 

This is an old refrain and it seems 
that it will always remain so. But 
why should it. When you gentlemen 
are married and own your own villas 
will you permit your neighbor to de- 
posit their garbage in your sunken 
garden? Nay, nay, say you! At least 
you should — but then of course we 
are not acquainted with your previous 
environment. 

You are college men — American col- 
!ege men at that. We are considered 

he cream of the American youth. We 

re the foundation upon which pos- 
L eritv rests. We are the scholars of 

he day — that is, some of us. But then 
if we are considered scholars, is it 

he duty of a scholar to indulge in the 
childish 'prank of casting apples 
"round to the purpose of making the 
-ampus, and especially the front of 
the men's dorm look likaj a place 
which even a street cleaner would 
avoid ? 

Though culture is not learning nor 
etiquette nor sophistication, it surely 
is not the depositing of rubbish 
around the campus. And culture is 
certainly one of the things for which 
we rhould strive during our stay in 
college. 

Far be it from us to reprimand. 
Mso far be it from us to attempt 
to reform, believing with Norman 
Douidas — "that a man who reforms 
himself has done enough to reform 
his neighbor." You can't toll a mule 
to ba^k up when he is disinclined 
nor will we try. But as it is the policv 
*f a naper to instruct — PLEASE RE 
FRATN FPOM TOSSING GARBAGF 
4R0TJND THE CAMPUS! 



ALUMNI NOTES 



On Friday evening there was a 
meeting of the York County Alumni 
of Lebanon Valley College held at Dal- 
lastown. There were about sixty per- 
sons present consisting of Alumni, 
students and prospective students. 

President Gossard and Mr. lOngle 
gave addresses on Lebanon Valley 
College. They both mnphasized the 
developemnt of the school, both from 
the scholastic and finoncial point. 

Two addresses were made by Oliver 
Butterwick '12 an ( ] David Fink '17 on 
"The most interesting things that hap- 
pened during their student days." 

The two oldest graduates that were 
there were: Urias Daugherty, '03, 
Supv. Principal of schools at Dallas- 
town, and Thomas A. Lawson '02 of 
D?llastown. 

Dr. John H. Ness was President of 
the County organization and conduct- 
ed the meeting. Dr. Paul Shannon is 
the newly elected president for the 
coming year. 

Harry Yetter '19, Field Secretary of 



the United States Chamber of Com- 
merce, is stationed at the present time 
in Harrisburg, Penna. 

Grant Nitrauer '21 is candidating 
for District Attorney of Monroe 
County. 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



The scientific world has suffered i 
great loss through the recent death 
of Dr. Albert Michelson, one of Amer- 
ca's foremost scientists and a leading 
physicists of the whole world. Dr. 
Michelson received his early scientific 
experience in the United States Navy, 
and later, as a result of his brilliant 
investigations, he became professor 
at various technical schools. He deter- 
mined the speed of light with great 
exactness and originated the means 
by which modern astronomers attain 
their astounding results. Dr. Michel- 
son reecntly was in consultation with 
a brother physicist and Jew, Albert 
Einstein, of relativity fame. The 
American scientist continued his in- 
vestigations to the last, and when he 
died last week at the age of 78, he 
was in the midst of another experi- 
ment to determine the speed of light. 
One can hardly help wondering how a 
man kept up such intensive mental 
work at that advanced age. 



And now appoars the "hot box," 
wheh seems to ba the anawer to the 
tired business man's prayer. This in- 
vention is a development of high fre- 
quency electrical stimulation applied 
to the brain by putting the subject's 
head in a cabinet. The result is said 
to be a gentle exhileration and speed- 
ing-up of the nervous reactions and 
mental processes, very much like drug 
or alcohol stimulation. Orestes H. 
Caldwell, editor of "PJlectronics" says 
these stimulations may result in "de- 
lightful jags," and that a whole new 
set of pi'ohobition laws may be neces- 
sary when they become more widely 
known. 



Columbia University, by means of 
its student publication, "The Spec- 
tator," has inaugurated a new custom 
which bids fair to become a fixture 
at the university. This custom con- 
sists of an annual poll, the object of 
which is to determine the students' 



1 


A-l SKTZ,I?W 




WORKS WONDERSW 








ANNVILLE 


SHOEMAN 



\\ hen You Leave College . . 
We Suggest You Take Along 

"Baptiste Laroque" 
Legends of French Canada 
by 

Paul A. W. W allace. 
The Price - - $1.50 
The Place 

K. S. BOLLMAN 

Bookseller & Stationer 
33 South Eighth Street 
Lebanon, Penna. 

BOLLMAN'S 

33 South Eighth Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



reactions to the various professors un- 
der whom they study. The survey is 
supposed to decide whether or not the 
teachers are sympathetic, approach- 
able, torceful, pedantic, scholarly, hu- 
morous and vivid. The object is not 
to disclose any forms of pedagogic 
iniquity, but to ascertain truly how 
the instructors "rate" with the stud- 
ent body. In the reecnt research, it 
w as lound that science prolessors are 
thought to be more uninteresting than 
history prolessors. This leads one to 
believe that in some cases the profes- 
sors are graded according to their 
..ubjects rather than their personality. 



Here is a story which, were it not 
ior the uniortunate outcome, would 
be very lunny, indeed. Mr. Samuel 
Armon, of Germantown, was seized 
with a severe sneezing spell which 
tasted for some minutes. Upon its ex- 
piration, Mr. Armon lound that he 
was unable to walk. A phyisican was 
called and declared that the accident 
was a rare one caused by the expan- 
sion ol the diaphragm during the at- 
tack. The uniortunate Mr. Armon 
laces a long siege in a cast until the 
inter-vertebral tissue which was in- 
jured will recover. 



Charlie Chaplin, he of the baggy 
trousers, has a special grievance 
against Europe in general and Eng- 
land in particular. Charles claims that 
he has been misunderstood, misin- 
terpreted, and bullied. As a conse- 
quence he has delivered a tirade 
against British "hypocrisy" and has 
declared that he does not care wheth- 
er he makes another moving picture. 
The peerage has been the especial ob- 
ject of his wrath. Chaplin claims that 
patriotism is the greatest insanity the 
world nas ever suffered and that it 
will all end in another war. He hopes 
that when that war comes, the old 
men will be sent to the front, be- 
cause "they are the real criminals of 
Europe today." Perhaps Charlie is 
not far wrong. 



Another miracle of modern medicine 
was recently performed in no less a 
personage than His Majesty, King 
Prajadhipok of Siam. The worthy 
ruler had been troubled for some 
time by a cataract on his left eye. 
Like a wise man, he came to these 
United States, and the miracle was 
duly performed at Ophir Hall, in 
Westchester County, New York. The 
cataract, or clouded lens inside the 
eyeball, was removed through an in- 
cision above the cornea. The king, af- 
ter the offending lens was taken out, 
exclaimed, "I see the light." All of 
which goes to show that the medical 
centers of the world are no longer in 
the cities of Europe, but are here in 
our own country. 



Augustine Courtauld, a scientist in 
the British Arctic air route expedi- 
tion through Greenland, who had be- 
come separated I'rom the main party, 
had the rar i privilege of spending 
over two months in the dark without 
any companions or books. He was 
forced to shelter himself in an igloo, 
or ice-hut, in order to be protected 
from a blizzard. The snow covered 
the igloo and, as Courtauld had no 
shovel, he had to stay in the hut with 
only a small chimney as communica- 
tion with the outside world, lie spent 
the two months dozing and thinking. 
Two weeks ago a relief party rescued 



him, heavily bearded and a little the 
worse for wear from an enforced diet 
of seal meat. 



About this time each year the at- 
tention of the musical world turns to 
the annual Bach festival at Bethle- 
hem, Pa., and an audience from all 
over the nation and from foreign 
countries congregate in the pictur- 
esque city on the Lehigh to hear the 
Bach choir under the direction of Dr. 
J. Fred Wolle. This year the choir 
offers nine cantatas by the German 
master. Pennsylvanians should feel 
proud that such a great musical shrine 
is located in the commonewalth. 



Another great German musician is 
remembered at the present time in an 
entirely different manner. Haydn, the 
father of the orchestra, died in 1809 
in Vienna. His grave was robbed af- 
ter his burial, and the robbers took off 
the skull of the great composer. The 
skull went through vicissitudes which 
read like a story of the wildest ad- 
venture. After wanderng for almost 
ia hundred years, the skull finally set- 
tled in the hands of a musical society 
in Vienna. This year the town of 
isenstadt, where Haydn lived for a 
number of years, is planning a cele- 
bration in honor of the master. The 
aldermen of Eisenstadt feel that the 
skull should be in the grave of the 
composer, but the musical society 
claims that it is responsible for the 
custody of the cranium. Thus a great 
deal of controversy is going on be- 
cause of a gruesome relic and the 
dissention threatens to mar the spirit 
of the whole celebration. 



FACULTY NOTES 



Dr. and Mrs. Wallace entertained 
the English Department at their home 
Friday evening. The English Depart- 
ment is made up of Miss Mary K. 
Wallace, Miss Helen E. Myers, Marie 
Ehrgott, Caroline Fisher, Ethel May 
Hower .and Edna Early. 

After dinner the entertinment took 
the form of a pleasant social gather- 
ing. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace spent a very 
pleasant week-end at a house-party at 
Asbury Park, N. J. 

Miss Lietzau and Madame Greene 
gave an elaborate bridge luncheon at 
the Hershey Golf Club on Saturday 
afternoon. 

Everything was beautifully decor- 
ated with roses and carnations. 

There were twenty guests, most of 
whom were faculty members. 

On Saturday the Botany class went 
on a field trip to Mt. Gretna. After 
a big tramp over the mountains they 
finally ended by sitting down to a de- 
licious dinner at Prof. Derickson's cot- 
tage. 

Prof, and Mrs. Derickson also en- 
tertained the following guests over 
the week-end: Dorothy Garber, Kath- 
ryn Krauss, Cloria LaVanture, Harriet 
Miller, Miriam Owen, Pass Bollinger* 
George Derickson, Russell Morgan* 
Herbert Roudabush and Willard Tre- 
zise. 

Dr. and Mrs. Bender entertained at 
dinner and bridge on Friday evening- 
The guests were: Mr. and Mrs. Wi"' 
iams; Prof, and Mrs. Gingrich, an< * 
Mrs. Wagner. 



LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

, ™ N - 8th St - " : - " : " Lebanon, Pa. ■ 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '0 3> 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 1931. 



PAGE THREE 




'Tis hot — beastly hot! Term papers, 
reports, this column, and a host of 
other things all to be done. No ambi- 
tion, no pep! What filthy weather! I 
squelch a desire to go walking with 
one of the fair sex and indulge in a 
battle of wits, with yours truly on the 
short end of the stick, and nobly and 
heroically sacrifice myself for the sake 
of dear old "Boomerang." Now, type- 
writer, you must not hiss. Some one 
just accused me of copying all my 
jokes from "College Life." Now my 
advice to the fair young Miss is not 
to spend twenty cents for the maga 
zine in question. Spend it at the Penn- 
way instead, and read the same jokes 
in this column. I'm going to send a 
bill to Mr. Hall for free publicity. The 
radio has just scratched out "On the 
Road to Mandalay." I wish I were 
there, or anywhere else but doing this 
column — but never mind that. We'll 
let it go. 



In reply to my request of a few 
weeks ago for a co-ed to assist me 
in opening staff mail, I regret to an- 
nounce that I have received only one 
reply. I am reprinting it below: 

t 
i 

My daar sir: 

My eyes chanced upon your "want 
ad" in the "Boomerang" column of the 
"La Vie" for Thursday, May 7, 1931. 
I have decided to give you a break, in 
answer to your plea for a good-look- 
ing co-ed secretary. I assure you that 
I can most successfully comply with 
all the requirements stated below, and 
still have time to open a letter now 
and then. 

For recommendations, note the fol- 
lowing: for good looks, ask Joe Hut- 
chinson; for personality, ask Eva Peck; 
for a goo f j figure, ask Mary Ann 
Rupp; for an ardent worker, ask Roy 
Lecthaler; for aiming to please, ask 
Russell Dennis. If the references 
prove unsatisfactoi-y, — try Chester- 
fields, they satisfy. 

If a personal interview is desired, 
suits me fine, — any time, any place, 
and how. 

Sincerely yours, 

A Co-ed. 



In reply to this letter I beg leave 
to state that the references were un- 
satisfactory, and so were the Chester- 
fields, I much prefer B. A. Rolfe and 
his Lucky Strikes. They're so kind to 
your throat. Besides, the postmaster 
told me that there was no such animal 
as Box No. 3013. You wouldn't fool 
me, would y° u • But don't get discour- 
aged, little girl. I will give you a per- 
sonal interview. Meet me in front of 
the "Ad" Building on the Fourth of 
J aly. Wear a fire-cracker in your 
hair so that I can recognize you. In 
case you desire to write to me again, 
do so. If you wish to have a copy of 
m y book, "How to Make a Success of 
peeping in Classes," send ten cents 
ln stamps, and I will send you a copy 
W return mail. 



Prof B: Now, Mr. Grant, what is 
the difference between Mr. Grant, the 
individual, and Mr. Grant, a member 
of the Senior Class? 

*ke G.: About forty dollars. 



The boy from the big city says that 
tlle grass here in Annville is not the 
re al article because it does not have 
the sig n "Do Not Walk on the Grass" 
°n it. 



, Since Duke Eliington has popular- 
ized the song, "Three Little Words," 
have decided to offer some three- 
w °r<l suggestions to the song writers 
°* the future. Here they are: Boy or 
j* 1 * Trumped my Ace, Did I Pass, 
Fobbed my Toes, Five and Ten, Black 
and Blue, Where's my Skirt, Beg or 



Borrow, Eat and Sleep, Study and 
Study, "Exams" are Here. The last 
named can be revised for opera, and 
should then be given as follows: "Ex- 
ams," "Exams," O "Exams," O dear 
me yea, "Exams" are Here. 



Am now offering my advice to ex- 
amination takers. Here 'tis: 

The woodpecker pecks 

Out a great many specks 
Of sawdust 

When building a hut. 
He works like a jigger 

To make the hole bigger 
He's sore if 

His cutters don't work. 
He's not caring for plans 

Of cheap artisans 
Another thing 

Can fairly be said: 
The whole excavation 

Has this explanation 
He builds it 

By using his head. 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



After having ravenously devoured 
a nice Hamburger smothered with 
sweet-smelling (?????) Bermuda 
Onions, I feel strong enough to en- 
deavor to get the column out. If the 
said column leaves as foul a taste in 
your mouths as the Onions did in 
mine gargle with "Blisterine" and eat 
some garlic; this is sure to give in- 
stant relief. 

Will the person who answered Ed. 
Shellenberger's advertisement for the 
position he has open, please give their 
identity! I have been accused of the 
act and after typing five Anthologies 
I never want to look a typewriter in 
the face again. What a job! I have 
written poetry until I dream of Omar 
Khayyam, Bobby Burns, Shakespeare, 
Riley, Teasdale, Shelley and all the 
deceased bards that ever bored a per- 
son with such nonsense as poetry. To 
me poetry is the height of nothing to 
do! 

Have you noticed the sudden out- 
cropping of mustaches ? At last man- 
hood has come into its own! At least 
I never had the experience of seeing 
a woman wth one, outside of a side- 
show! Any women with confidence 
please see Ye Editor and we shall en- 
deavor to cash in on the proposition. 

While on the subject of Nose Shub- 
bery let me give a few words of con- 
fidence to the few gents, who have 
boldly and bravely tried to cultivate 
a crop. Be not disamyed at the rab- 
el! Don't put your hands over your 
pride when entering the dining hall! 
Mr. Dellinger, thou hast nursed thy 
"sage" from a straggling, tender 
spi'out to what promises to be a blue 
ribbon winner! Of course it is now in 
its early stages and its beauty has not 
reached the mellowness of Red Barr's! 
However, you haven't been engaged in 
the business for as long a period of 
time. Take heart son, thou hast a 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



good color but the "stand" is poor! 

I have always wondered at just what 
nourishment a well going mustache 
must have? Some say Lhnburger 
Cheese. Other say Beer Foam. Soup 
has come as a timely suggestion. Spa- 
ghetti has not the right amount of 
phosphates in it. Garlic seems to pre- 
vail among the Latin nations and they 
indeed, grow some prize Brush. Will 
some one please enlighten me. Some- 
day I may muster up enough courage 
to try my hand at the Lip Forage en- 
terprise. 

After trying various and sundry 
Anthologies I have come to the con- 
clusion that the boys and "gals" of 
yesteryear were just as enamored as 
the lads and lassies of today! the only 
difference seems to be in the language 
used. They did not have such tei-ms 
as: Necidn', Pettin; Muggin' and 
Moonin'. They drove old Dobbin' down 
the old back road. Wrapped the reins 
around the whip socket and went to 
work! We are handicapped today. You 
take your girl out in a doubtful Ford 
and di'ive down highway number 253- 
47563 and try to find a spot that will 
inspire you. The sign boards tell us 
to take Dr. Squirms Kidney Pills for 
that rundown feeling. Another says 
that Mr. Plantem sells nice fresh 
tombstones! You also learn that whis- 
kers can be easily erased with Slash- 
em and Nickem shaving soap. The 
bend in the murmuring stream is 
reached, here, where Father a few de- 
cades ago made Mother's heart do 
funny tricks, now harbors a hot dog 
stand. Picnickers are here and there 
and you have about as much chance for 
solitude as a flea in a monkey cage. 
If you do park along the road you are 
soon aroused by a gruff voice from Of- 
ficer Flatfeet shouting, "Say, youse 
two what d'ya tink dis is . . Lovers- 
leap? Alas and alackaday! What a 
change machinery has made in the 
world's oldest pastime! 

Now that a few hours have passed 
I believe I shall venture to bed. The 
onions probably will make me see two- 
headed monsters and all sorts of hob 
goblins. However, here goes and until 
next week. 

So Long! 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



The regular meeting if the Clion- 
ian Literary Society was called to or- 
der May 15 by Ethel May Hower. Af- 
ter a short business session a program 
with spring as its theme was given. 

Ann Kiehl acted as chairman. Sev- 
eral spring poems were read very well 
by Ann Esbenshade, while Charlotte 
Weirich favored us with a clever 



Sandwiches Sodas 

EAT AT ROEMIG'S 

DELICIOUS HOME MADE 

ICE CREAM 
Cigars Cigarettes 



GET OUR RATES ON SPECIAL BANQUETS 
AND DINNERS 

The Pennway 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



dance. She was accompanied by Anne 
Matula. Mildred Nye read the Olive 
Branch and after the cr>-ic's report, 
the meeting was adjourned. 



Things I Never Noiiced Until Now! 



Our idea of leisure — living Bohem- 
ish in Greenwich Village . . if you 
care for lessons in pronouncing Rus- 
sian names, try reading "Anna Kar- 
enini" . . a dynaimc classic that spits 
forth truth . . about this time of the 
year people begin to "moon" about 
exams . . a certain individual that 
loafs in the Pennway that reminds us 
of Mr. Spectator . . the vivid green 
vines that are beginning to climb 
around the buildings . . the hilarity 
in drinking highballs in pajamas over 
the kitchen sink at 2 a. m. . . every 
body seems to be waiting for two 
things — examinations and John Bar- 
rymore's new picture "Svengali" . . 
one of the best pictures we've seen 
this month is "A Connecticut Yan- 
kee" wth Will Rogers . . there's actu- 
ally a freshman girl that continues 
to walk with an air of sophistication 
. . the drabness of the Libi'ary walls 
and those antiquated lamps that sus- 
pend from the ceiling . . one of the 
belt articles we've read this month is 
"The Fun in Being a Fool" in the 
June Cosmopolitan . . if you ever vis- 
ited New York Bohemian section be 
sure and read that clever article in 
May Scribner's entitled "Good Bye 
Bohemia" . . it will bring tears to 
expectant celebreities on the campus 
. . the smell of sweet grass after the 
lawn mower has cut the campus . . 
why do they hand us term papers to 
write on these hot days . . we still 
shake when we hear that wierd cry, 
"All Freshmen out" . . people who 
dsgust me are those that can write 
short stories for profit but are too 
lazy . . the beauty in the sunrise over 
Gretna Mountaints. . you feel inspired 
to do bigger and better things after 
viewing it before breakfast. . 



Y. M. NOTES 



The regular Sunday evening dis- 
cussion group of the Y. M. C. A. was 
held in the "Y" room of the Men's 
Dormitory. After the singing of a few 
well-known hymns, Paul Emenheiser 
led m devotions, using selections from 
the Proverbs as his scriptural basis. 



THIS IS A QUALITY SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

Service, Workmansh'p and Materials 
Hand Stitching 

W. D. ELLIOTT, JR. 

140 N. Railroad St., 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



Paul K. Keene then gave a short talk* 
on the subject. "Are extra-curricula 
activities worth the time required on 
our campus?" This talk Droved very 
stimulating, and following it a discus- 
sion took place on the relative value 
of other work than book learning. 

In closing, a few hymns weoje sung, 
and the customary circle of prayer 
was held. The spirit of the meeting 
was fine, and the singing especially 
good. 

Due to a misunderstanding, the 
meeting of last week was not ''.written 
for the newspaper, but meetings are 
being held regularly, and the', attend- 
ance of them is always such that addi- 
tional chairs must be obtained from 
adjoining rooms. 



BATTING AVERAGES 



Williams still leads the list 1 of bat- 
ters. Shortledge jumped from seventh 
place up to second place by collecting 
2 hits out of throe times at bat Sat- 
urday. Daub ran to fourth place and 
Light displaced Wycoff in tihrd place. 

I 

Williams 3 11 7 ' ' .636> 

Shortledge 4 16 5 .313 

Reeder 4 14 4 .28$ 

Light 4 18 5 1 ' .27& 

Daub 3 11 3 ' .21$ 

Wycoff 4 16 4 .25tf 

Stewart 4 17 4 : .23F 

Patrizio 4 13 3 .231" 

Murphy 7 4 12 2 .133 

Dennis 4 13 1 :tt7T 

Kraybill 1 10 .000 

Nye 11 :< .000 ! 

Wood 1 1 ' : .000 

Trczise 110 .000 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESSING 
KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORN AS 



10 W. Main St. 



Anftville, Pa. 



Everything in the Printed 
Line — 




ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 



TOURIST BELL PHONE 

ACCOMMODATIONS ANNVILLE 69-R-13 

YE COZY INN, H. C. COFFROATH, Prop. 
Wm. Penn Highway, 4 Miles West of Lebanon, Pa. 
We Cater To Private Parties and Banquets 
Special Dinners and A La Carte Service 
Ample Parking Space We Serve With a Smile 




KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHE R 
COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, Pa. 



NEW LINE OF FROCKS 
AND GOWNS 

Rose Singer Shop 



7G1 Cumberland Street, 



Lebanon, Pa. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 1931. 



Among Our Seniors 







■ . .. i 

1 ■ • ■ '' ! 




DOROTHY HAFER 



A chuckle and then another. Soon 
a laugh floats over the air. Yes, it is 
Dottie Hafer. She is such a cheery 
person, who always finds something in 
which to be amused. We all like to 
be in her company because we are 
sure of a genuine laugh issuing now 
and then from her lips which will af- 
fect us in the same way. 

Dottie is one of the most active of 
Seniors. As president of Delphian Lit- 
erary Society, she was a busy little 
bee and during the entire year she 
has given her staunch support to the 
W. S. G. A., being a distinguished 
member of that board. And we dare 



not overlook Dottie's musical taient. 
she has delighted us many times with 
ner charming voice. 

Dottie's good naturedness, her buoy- 
ancy, her sheer high spirits will make 
ner successful in life and will be sure 
to find her many friends. She is in- 
terested especially in her chosen field, 
that of teaching, and we are undoubt- 
edly sure that she will be a winning 
instructor. Here's to you, Dottie. 



J. ROBERT ESHLEMAN 

The boy prodigy from Campbell- 
town, Ohio. And can he rattle them 
there piano keys. Already the boy has 
a B. Mus. 

But music isn't the only thing in 



which his attributes have led him. 
Nay, nay, drama too has gained since 
he left the backwoods of Ohio to seek 
the sun in Pennsylvania. And to all 
reports he has found it and withstood 
its glare. Good boy Bob! 

The dramatic presentations in which 
he has starred are "The Private Secre- 
tary," by Hawtr:>y and Beaumonts, 
and Fletcher's ''The Knight of the 
Burning Pestle." 

Bob was also a member of the La 
Vie staff last season. He wrote the 
Boomerange — but perhaps we have 
told too much. 

So far Bob's plans for next year are 
still undetermined. However he is 
open for offers. 



MYLINMEN WIN 

SLUGFEST 17-10 



(Continued from Page 1) 



ledge tripled scoring Murphy, but was 
caught off third. Wycoff was safe on 
an error. Williams walked. Light lac- 
ed a. long triple to left scoring Wycoff 
and Williams. Stewart singled to send 
Light across the platter. 

P. M. C. was not to be out done, 
they tallied four counters on three 
hits, a walk and an error. Theviates 
walked. Diego fanned and Wilson fan- 
ned. Kane was safe on an error by 
Dennis. Yosco triple^ scoring both 
runners. Miller singled scoring Yosco 
and scored on Warren's double. Loyer 
hit to the pitcher for the third out. 
This was P.M.C.'s last threat and the 
score stood at 10 all. 

Lebanon Valley scored one in the 
seventh on three v/alks and Short- 
ledge's fifth hit. The eighth was the 
best inning for the home towners — 
they pushed five runs across the pan. 

Stewart singled to start the frame. 
Dennis followed with a single to right 
sending Stewart to third. Murphy 
was safe on an error crossing the 
sacks. Reeder went out pitcher to 
first as Stewart scared. Patrizio sent 
Dennis and Murphy home with a dou- 
ble to right. Shortledge was safe on 
a fielders choice. Wycoff flied to cen- 
ter. Williams hit scoring Patrizio. 
Light sent Shortledge across the plate 
with a single to center. Stewart lin- 
ed to the pitcher to end the track 
meet. 

P.M.C. collected two hits in then 
half of the frame but a double play 
killed their chances. L.V.C. countered 
their 17th in the ninth on a walk and 
two hits. Dennis walked. Murphy hit 
to left sei.din r , Den is to third. Reed- 
er was cut third to first. Patrizio 
struck out but Shortledge crashed 



number six to the outer gardens and 
oenms scored. Wycoff flied to center 
to enj the scoring for the day. The 
home team was retired in order. 

The game was one of the best from 
a slugging standpoint played by the 
locals in several seasons. They col- 
lected a total of twenty one hits, sev- 
en of them for extra bases. Shortledge 
and Murphy collected ten hits be- 
tween them. The former had six out 
of seven trips, the latter four out of 
six. Patrizio, Light and Shortledge 
had three baggers. Murphy, Patrizio 
and Stewart collected f° r doubles. 
Daub, Wood and Reeder each served 
base hits on platters to the home team 
but they had them to sp&re — P.M.C. 
collected 14 hits — four for extra bases. 
The credit for the victory goes to 
Daub, while Hunsicker is credited with 
the loss. Wilson relieved him in the 
sixth but the game was already lost 
from a scorer's standpoint. 

The box score: 

L. V. C. 

AB. R. H. PO. A. 

Patrizio, If 5 3 2 1 1 

Shortledge, cf 7 16 2 

Wycoff, 2b 6 10 4 2 

Williams, rf 3 2 10 

Light, ss 6 12 16 

Stewart, 3b 6 13 2 

Daub, p 2 2 2 1 

Dennis, lb 3 2 1 10 1 

Murphy, c 6 4 4 7 1 

Wood, p 1 

Reeder, p 2 2 

Totals 47 17 21 27 14 

P. M. C. 

AB. R. H. PO. A. 

Kane, 2b 4 2 2 3 

Yosco, 3b 4 3 3 1 4 

Miller, ss 5 2 2 3 1 

Warren, c 5 2 7 

Layer, cf 4 14 



Britten, If 5 2 

Theviates, rf 4 2 

Diago, lb 4 13 9 

Husicker, p 2 10 2 

Wilson, p 2 1 2 

Totals 39 10 14 27 12 

Score by innings: 

L. V. C 1 2 2 1 4 1 5 1—17 

P. M. C. 00402400 0—10 

Errors: Loyer, Diego, Dennis, Stew- 
art. Runs batted in: Patrizio 2, Short- 
ledge 6, Williams, Lennis, Stewart, 
Light 2, Daub, Murphy 3, Kane 2, 
Yosco 2, Miller, Loyer 2, Diego. Two 
base hits: Patrizid, Stewart, Murphy 
2, Warren, Loyer. Three base hits: 
Patr'.zio, Shortledge, Light, Miller, 
Yosco. Double play,;: Miller to Kane 
to Diego, Britten to Yosco to Kane, 
Wycoff to Light to Dennis. Winning 
pitcher: Daub. Losing pitcher: Hun- 



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L. V. C. DEFEATS 

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(Continued from Page 1) 



pitcher had plenty of stuff and fair 
control. Patrizio struck out nine 
and walked two while Donnel struck 
out eight and walked four. Neither 
team was hitting the ball as they 
had been doing in previous games. 
Williams, led the field of hitters and 
handled the initial sack in fine style 
while Shortledge collected two hits 
and batted in two runs. 

The next game is with Pennsylvania 
Military College at Chester, Pa., Wed- 
nesday and then on Saturday the team 
journeys to Sellingsgrove for a return 
engagement with Susquehanna. 

The box score: 

SUSQUEHANNA 

AB. R. H. AO. A. 

Donnel, p 3 10 4 

Spiglemeyer, 3b 4 3 

Molasky, If 4 13 

Straup, cf 4 2 

Morrow, 2b 1 10 

Rubis, ss 4 10 2 

Palmer, lb 4 117 

Shaffer, c 3 8 

Glenn, rf 4 1 

Herman, 2b 3 2 1 2 

Keller, c 1 

Totals 35 1 8 24 8 



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L. V. C. 

AB. R. H. AO. A. 

Shortledge, cf 3 2 n 

Wycoff, 2b 4 3 Q 

Light, ss 4 1 o o 

Williams, rf 3 1 2 11 Q 

Reeder, If 4 q 

Stewart, 3b 3 1 2 5 

Daub, If 3 1 1 1 

Patrizio, p 3 1 6 

Murphy, c 4 7 3 

Dennis, lb 3 q 

Total 31 3 7 27 i 6 

Score by innings: 

Susque. 00000010 0— 1 

L. V. C 02001000 

Errors: Williams, Morrow. Runs 
batted in, Shortledge 2; Stewart. Two 
base hits, Rubis. Three base hits: Wil- 
liams. Stolen bases, Williams, Light, 
Daub and Rubis. Double plays: Rubis 
to Herman to Palmer. Struck out by 
Donnel 8; by Patrizio 9. Base on balls: 
off Donnel 4; off Patrizio 2. Hit by 
pitcher, by Donnel (Daub). Umpire: 
Gallager. Time of game, 1.25. 



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